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This is the official website for the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association, established in 1873. We are a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization.

LA COUNTY FAIR - BEE BOOTH

Equipment, Supplies (Local)


Welcome to the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association!

For over 130 years the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association has been serving the Los Angeles Beekeeping Community. Our group membership is composed of commercial and small scale beekeepers, bee hobbyists, and bee enthusiasts. So whether you came upon our site by design or just 'happened' to find us - welcome! Our primary purpose is the care and welfare of the honeybee. We achieve this through education of ourselves and the general public, supporting honeybee research, and practicing responsible beekeeping in an urban environment. 

"The bee is more honored than other animals, not because she labors, but because she labors for others."  Saint John Chrysostom 



Next LACBA Meeting:
 
Monday, November 6, 2017. Meeting: 7PM. Open Board Meeting: 6:30PM.

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101:
 We had our final LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 for the 2017 season. Please check back in January 2018 for info re our 2018 season. For info on our classes see: Beekeeping Class 101.

Check out our Facebook page for lots of info and updates on bees; and please remember to LIKE US: https://www.facebook.com/losangelesbeekeeping 

THE LATEST BUZZ:  

Tuesday
Oct102017

Bee-Harming Pesticides In 75 Percent Of Honey Worldwide: Study

 PHYS.ORG    By Kerry Sheridan     October 5, 2017

Bees help pollinate 90 percent of the world's major crops, but in recent years have been dying off from "colony collapse disorder" Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-10-bee-harming-pesticides-percent-honey-worldwide.

Traces of pesticides that act as nerve agents on bees have been found in 75 percent of honey worldwide, raising concern about the survival of these crucial crop pollinators, researchers said Thursday.

Human health is not likely at risk from the concentrations detected in a global sampling of 198 types of honey, which were below what the European Union authorizes for human consumption, said the report in the journal Science.

However, the study found that 34 percent of honey samples were contaminated with "concentrations of neonicotinoids that are known to be detrimental" to bees, and warned that chronic exposure is a threat to bee survival.

Bees help pollinate 90 percent of the world's major crops, but in recent years have been dying off from "colony collapse disorder," a mysterious scourge blamed on mites, pesticides, virus, fungus, or some combination of these factors.

"The findings are alarming," said Chris Connolly, a neurobiology expert at the University of Dundee, who also wrote a Perspective article alongside the research in Science.

"The levels detected are sufficient to affect bee brain function and may hinder their ability to forage on, and pollinate, our crops and our native plants."

Neonicotinoids have been declared a key factor in bee decline worldwide, and the European Union issued a partial ban on their use in 2013.

For the Science study, the European samples were collected largely before this ban took effect, Connolly said. Further research is needed to gauge the effectiveness of the EU steps.

Five common pesticides

Bees collect nectar as they pollinate plants, and over time this sugary liquid accumulates into the thick syrup of honey.

To test contamination levels, samples of honey were taken from local producers worldwide, and researchers tested for five commonly used neonicotinoids: acetamiprid, clothianidin, imidacloprid, thiacloprid, and thiamethoxam.

These pesticides, introduced in the mid 1990s, are based on the chemical structure of nicotine and attack the nervous systems of insect pests.

"Overall, 75 percent of all honey samples contained at least one neonicotinoid," said the study, led by Edward Mitchell of the University of Neuchatel in Switzerland.

"Of these contaminated samples, 30 percent contained a single neonicotinoid, 45 percent contained two or more, and 10 percent contained four or five."

The frequency of contamination was highest in the North American samples (86 percent), followed by Asia (80 percent) and Europe (79 percent).

The lowest concentrations were seen in South American samples (57 percent).

"These results suggest that a substantial proportion of world pollinators are probably affected by neonicotinoids," said the study.

'Serious concern'

Our planet is home to some 20,000 species of bees, which fertilize more than 90 percent of the world's 107 major crops.

The United Nations warned in 2016 that 40 percent of invertebrate pollinators—particularly bees and butterflies—risk global extinction.

Experts said that while the findings are not exactly a surprise, the threat posed by neonicotinoids should be taken seriously.

"The levels recorded (up to 56 nanogram per gram) lie within the bioactive range that has been shown to affect bee behavior and colony health," said plant ecologist Jonathan Storkey, who was not involved in the study.

"Scientists showed earlier this year that levels of less than 9 ng/g reduced wild bee reproductive success," he added.

"I therefore agree with the authors that the accumulation of pesticides in the environment and the concentrations found in hives is a serious environmental concern and is likely contributing to pollinator declines."

According to Lynn Dicks, natural environment research council fellow at the University of East Anglia, the findings are "sobering" but don't offer a precise picture of the threat to bees.

"The severity of the global threat to all wild pollinators from neonicotinoids is not completely clear from this study, because we don't know how the levels measured in honey relate to actual levels in nectar and pollen that wild pollinators are exposed to," she said.

The levels of exposure to harmful pesticides may be far higher than what can be measured in honey, said Felix Wackers, a professor at Lancaster University who was not involved in the research.

"This shows that honeybees are commonly exposed to this group of pesticides while collecting neonicotinoid-contaminated nectar from treated crops or from flowers that have come into contact with spray drift or soil residues," he said.

"The actual level of exposure can be substantially higher, as the honey samples analyzed in this study represents an average of nectar collection over time and space."

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-10-bee-harming-pesticides-percent-honey-worldwide.html#jCp

Friday
Oct062017

2017 World's Oldest Beehives, Found in Israel, Promise Biblically Sweet New Year

BreakingIsraelNews     By Adam Eliyahu Berkowit    September 26, 2017

“My son, eat honey, for it is good; Let its sweet drops be on your palate.” Proverbs 24:13 (The Israel Bible™)

 

image: https://www.breakingisraelnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/beehive2-1.png

Beeswax was found at the bottom of the ancient beehives excavated at Tel Rehov in the Jordan Valley, the oldest ever discovered. (Courtesy Amihai Mazar)

An Israeli archaeologist made a remarkable and rare discovery to ensure that all of Israel has a year as sweet as honey, while helping understand the Bible just a little bit better.

Hebrew University professor Amihai Mazar was exploring an archaeological dig at a site in the Jordan Valley called Tel Rehov when he found evidence of beekeeping 3,000 years ago, the oldest evidence of this industry ever discovered.

“Beekeeping is not described in the Bible and Israel is not especially suited for beekeeping, no more or less than any other place with flowers,” Professor Mazar said. “But even today, if you go out to the fields in that region, there are hives in the field.”

Biblical scholars believe that when the Bible mentions honey, it is usually referring to honey made from dates. Professor Mazar pointed to his discovery as evidence that the Bible could also be referring to honey from bees.

image: https://www.breakingisraelnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/beehive1.png

Just last week, Jews around the world dipped apples in honey in hopes of a blessedly sweet New Year. This find may indicate that the link between Jews and honey is more ancient than previously thought.

The archaeologists did not expect to find beehives while digging, but there was no other explanation for the discovery.

“We found a long row of clay cylinders, each one of them approximately two and a half feet long and about one foot in diameter,” Professor Mazar told Breaking Israel News. The clay pots, made of unbaked clay mixed with straw, were piled three high.

image: https://www.breakingisraelnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/beehive-stack.png

The researchers eventually concluded they had discovered the oldest beehives in the world. Sealed with removable lids at one end, the other end of the cylinder had a small hole for the bees to enter. The discovery was unprecedented, and no other ancient hives have been found in Israel.

“This is the only archaeological dig in Israel at which beehives have been found,” Dr. Mazar said. “It was also unusual since normally, beehives are kept outside of the city. We were surprised when we found the hives where they were – inside a large and thriving city.”

image: https://www.breakingisraelnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/honey-1.jpg

Many archaeologists believe the site is where the Prophet Elisha lived at approximately the same time bees were buzzing around.

“Though it was not mentioned in the Bible, this was a very large and important city in the time of King Achav and Elijah the prophet,” Professor Mazar said. He estimated that at the time, the city was home to approximately 2,500 people.

Researchers believe there were at least 180 hives housing more than a million bees, with each hive producing about 11 pounds of honey each year.

The archaeologists also found remains of actual bees, identifying the breed as being native to Turkey.

“These are the most ancient bees ever found in the world,” Professor Mazar said. “They did not arrive in Israel by themselves, so there had to be thriving trade between Israel and Turkey at the time.”

Unfortunately, the story has a bitter ending. The hives were found under a layer of ash and debris, indicating the city was destroyed by fire. Inside some of the pots was a black substance the researchers identified as burned beeswax.

Read more at https://www.breakingisraelnews.com/95483/worlds-oldest-beehives-farmed-israel-time-prophet-elisha-photos/#Zzg106FPSYOo1PtB.99

Saturday
Sep302017

LACBA Meeting Monday, October 2, 2017

LACBA MEETING - Monday, October 2, 2017. (Meeting Starts: 7PM, Open Board Meeting 6:30PM). All are Welcome! Mount Olive Lutheran Church, 3561 Foothill Blvd., La Crescenta, CA 91214 (In Shilling Hall). Parking next to the church, overflow parking behind the church.

 

Tuesday
Sep262017

Randy Oliver (Scientific Beekeeping) to Speak at BASC & Orange County Beekeepers Association

Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, September 28, 29 & 30, 2017, come learn about bees and beekeeping with Randy Oliver (Scientific Beekeeping). 

When: Thursday, September 28th, 6:30pm-8:55pm
Where:
La Mirada Civic Center (Resource Room)
Cost: (FREE)
Randy Oliver will be speaking at the September meeting of the Beekeepers Association of Southern California. (See details/flyer below and here.)

Friday, September 29th, 7:00pm (doors open at 6:30pm)
Where: OC Fairgrounds (Silo Building)
Cost: $5.00
Join Randy Olliver and the Orange County Beekeepers Association at the OC Fairgrounds. (See details/flyer below and here.)

When: Saturday, September 30th, 9am-4pm
Where: The Irvine Ranch Education Center,
Cost: $40 / $50. 
Orange County Beekeepers Association Event.

Randy will present a full day disease and pest management workshop, intermediate beekeeping topics, also covering other common problems such as insufficient honey or pollen stores, and a hands on demonstration. You have got to see Randy handle a hive - he's amazing!

$40 registration fee for members of the OC club. $50 registration for non-members so bring a friend. Sack lunch and drinks will be provided. Seats are limited to 35 so don't delay. Sign up here http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07eejcjz002b0afc0f&llr=uikx5dkab

Thursday, September 28, 2017
BEEKEEPERS ASSOCIATION OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
La Mirada Civic Center
Resource Room
13710 La Mirada Blvd.
La Mirada, CA 90638

6:30pm-8:55pm
Friday, September 29, 2017
ORANGE COUNTY BEEKEEPERS ASSOCIATION
 OC Fairgrounds
88 Fair Drive (Silo Building)
Costa Mesa, CA 92626 

7:00pm

Saturday, September 30, 2017
ORANGE COUNTY BEEKEEPERS ASSOCIATION
 Irvine Outdoor Education Center
2 Irvine Park Rd.
Irvine, CA 92869
9:00am-4:00pm

Randy Oliver:

Randy is a regular contributor to the American Beekeeping Journal, owner/author of scientificbeekeeping.com, and one of the premier beekeeping speakers in the US. We are very fortunate to have him share his knowledge with us. This is a rare chance to ask questions of one of the most respected researchers in the field ! Join us and enjoy an informal presentation on Randy's latest research projects and hive management.

“I started keeping bees as a hobbyist around 1966, and then went on to get university degrees in biological sciences, specializing in entomology.  In 1980 I began to build a migratory beekeeping operation in California, and currently run around 1000-1500 hives with my two sons, from which we make our livings.

In 1993, the varroa mite arrived in California, and after it wiped out my operation for the second time in 1999, I decided to “hit the books” and use my scientific background to learn to fight back.  I started writing for the American Bee Journal in 2006, and have submitted articles nearly every month since then (see “Articles by Publication Date”–scroll to the bottom for the most recent).

My writing for the Journal brought me requests to speak at beekeeping conventions, which has also allowed me the chance to visit beekeepers from all over North America and several other continents.  I read most every scientific study relating to beekeeping, and regularly correspond with beekeepers and researchers worldwide.

What I try to do in my articles and blogs is to scour scientific papers for practical beekeeping applications, and to sort through the advice, opinion, and conjecture found in the bee magazines and on the Web, taking no positions other than to provide accurate information to Joe Beekeeper.

I regularly update the articles on this site as new information becomes available, and solicit constructive criticism or comments.  Perhaps the best venue for such discussion is at the Informed Discussion of Beekeeping Issues and Bee Biology.  Be sure to subscribe to updates, and I’ll email you monthly when I add content to the sitehttp://scientificbeekeeping.com/scientific-beekeeping-newsletter/

Tuesday
Sep262017

Bees Will Be The Saviors Of Coffee Drinkers With Areas In Latin America Suitable For Growing Coffee Facing Predicted Declines

Catch The Buzz    September 22, 2017

David RoubikBees will be the saviors of coffee drinkers with areas in Latin America suitable for growing coffee facing predicted declines of 73% – 88% by 2050.

Research, co-authored by David Roubik, senior scientist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, finds diversity in bee species may save the day, even if many species in cool highland regions are lost as the climate warms.

“For my money, we do a far superior job of predicting the future when we consider both plants and animals – or in this case the bees – and their biology,” Roubik says. “Traditional models don’t build in the ability of organisms to change. They’re based on the world as we know it now, not on the way it could be as people and other organisms adapt.”

The research team modeled impacts for Latin America, the largest coffee-growing region under several global-warming scenarios – considering both the plants and the bees.

The team consisted of bee experts from the Smithsonian in Panama; the International Center for Tropical Agriculture in Vietnam; the Tropical Agricultural Research and Higher Education Center in Costa Rica; Conservation International and the University of Vermont in the U.S.; CIRAD in France; and CIFOR in Peru.

Despite predicted declines in total bee species, in all scenarios at least five bee species were left in future coffee-suitable areas; in about half of the areas, 10 bee species were left.

For land no longer suitable for coffee production, the team recommended management strategies to help farmers switch to other crops or production systems.

In areas where bee diversity is expected to decrease, but coffee can still be grown, adaptation strategies may include increasing bee habitat and maintaining native bees.

Many coffee types prefer to grow in the shade of tall trees. Choosing tree species that favor bees is a win-win strategy, the researchers say.

Roubik’s favorite example of a potentially huge environmental change that did not play out as predicted is the case of Africanized honey bees, which were accidentally released in Brazil in 1957.

Roubik’s studies in Panama of coffee pollination taking native rainforest bees into consideration began in the 1970s as the aggressive non-native Africanized honey bees swarmed north through Latin America.

Doomsayers predicted the worst – the killer bees would disrupt the delicate balance between tropical forest species and their native pollinators.

Roubik discovered the opposite to be true.

In lowland tropical forests in Mexico, plants pollinated by very busy Africanized bees ended up producing more flowers, thus making more pollen and nectar available to native bees.

“Africanized honey bees in the Western Hemisphere both regulate their nest temperature and their own body temperature using water,” Roubik says. “When the climate is hotter – unless it’s too dry – they’re better adapted to endure climate change and pollinate coffee, an African plant””

The research, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests that by paying attention to biological processes and managing coffee for maximum pollination depending upon the effects of climate on both the plants and the bees, as well as strategically adjusting shade, rotating crops and conserving natural forests, it may be possible for coffee producers to adapt to climate change.

Read at