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This is the official website for the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association, established in 1873. We are a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization.

Bare Bees:
kevin.heydman@gmail.com
Bill's Bees
Holly Hawk 626-807-0572
The Valley Hive 

Equipment, Supplies (Local)
LA COUNTY FAIR - BEE BOOTH


Welcome to the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association!

For over 130 years the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association has been serving the Los Angeles Beekeeping Community. Our group membership is composed of commercial and small scale beekeepers, bee hobbyists, and bee enthusiasts. So whether you came upon our site by design or just 'happened' to find us - welcome! Our primary purpose is the care and welfare of the honeybee. We achieve this through education of ourselves and the general public, supporting honeybee research, and practicing responsible beekeeping in an urban environment. 

"The bee is more honored than other animals, not because she labors, but because she labors for others."  Saint John Chrysostom 



Next LACBA Meeting:
Monday, May 7, 2018. General Meeting: 7PM. Open Board Meeting: 6:30PM.  

Next LACBA Beekeeping Class 101:
Sunday, April 15, 2018, 9AM-Noon at The Valley Hive.

Check out our Facebook page for lots of info and updates on bees; and please remember to LIKE US: https://www.facebook.com/losangelesbeekeeping 

THE LATEST BUZZ:  

Thursday
Apr122018

2017-2018 Colony Loss & Management Survey - NOW LIVE!

The 2017-2018 Colony Loss & Management Survey – NOW LIVE! MARCH 31, 2018

Our survey and a lovely coffee always go hand-in-hand!And no, this isn’t an April Fool’s Day joke! 

Our survey and a lovely coffee always go hand-in-hand!

You’re busy! We know that. You’re out catching swarms, picking up packages, and checking your colonies!

So grab a coffee or tea, sit down, relax, AND…

…take the Survey Today!

The information that you provide will be invaluable to our understanding of honey bee health around the country.

As background, the BIP’s National Loss Survey was launched for the first time in 2006, and thanks to the many thousands of beekeepers who have participated since then, we have been able to document and better understand long-term honey bee colony loss trends. Check out the interactive state loss map as evidence!

Members of the Auburn University Bee Lab hard at work producing paper-versions of the survey.In 2010, BIP’s National Management Survey was added to help us understand how management practices are potentially linked to colony survivorship. Thanks to your answers, we have been able to develop a dynamic management data tool. Feel free to play around with the interface. Want to know how colony losses compared between beekeepers that DID or DID NOT use a varroa treatment? Or what about the average age of comb in colonies? It’s all there!

This year, our colleagues at Auburn University in Sweet Home Alabama have coordinated the survey. We’re really happy to have them on board!

Please help us to develop more helpful tools for you by clicking the link below to take this years’ National Colony Loss and Management Survey.

Take the survey now!

Older comb is usually darker than younger comb, and may contain higher levels of pesticide residues and parasites such as spores of Nosema.If you would like to prepare yourself for our questions, or want to take some notes while you’re looking at your colonies, download this PDF to have a look at the 2017 – 2018 National Colony Loss and Management Survey Preview. Note that this preview should serve as an aid to the questions that are asked on the survey. Please, do not mail this preview version back to us. Please take the online survey!

Many thanks to all previous participants, and to all you new-Bees for taking some time out of your busy schedule to fill out this year’s survey.

Written By: The Bee Informed Team: The Bee Informed Partnership is a collaboration of efforts across the country from some of the leading research labs and universities in agriculture and science to better understand honey bee declines in the United States. Supported by the United States Department of Agriculture and the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, we’re working with beekeepers to better understand how we can keep healthier bees. The key to our success is the true partnership we maintain across a wide range of disciplines including traditional honey bee science, economics, statistics, and medical research that makes all these tools available to this important research. And just as important as the tools are the people. We not only have the leading researchers in the honey bee industry, we also have advisory boards from the commercial beekeeping industries, almond and other commercial growers, as well as naturalists and conservationists from across the country.

https://beeinformed.org/2018/03/31/the-2017-2018-colony-loss-management-survey-now-live/

Thursday
Apr122018

Pollinator: Judgment Day

University of Maryland: the1a.org (NPR) March 27, 2018

Mohammed Abed/Getty Images

The continued decline of bee colonies — they fell by a third from 2016 to 2017 — has inspired some criminal enterprises.

honeybee heist in California led to the discovery of a “beehive chop shop” and thieves scheming to pinch pollinators.

And then there’s honey. “Foods that can’t be differentiated by sight will often be faked, and honey fills the bill,” writes Larry Olmsted, who investigated food fraud for a book.

Complex global trades can obscure the true source — and composition — of the gooey goods in our cupboards. So when we buy a bottle or a bear, how do we know we’re getting the good stuff?

Guests

Kim Flottum Editor, Bee Culture Magazine

Eric Wenger Chairman, True Source Honey

Margarita Lopez-Uribe Assistant professor of entomology, Penn State University; she studies how environmental changes impact the bee population.

Gene Brandi Past president, current board member at the American Beekeeping Federation; owner, Gene Brandi Apiaries

How To Make Sure Your Honey Is Real

1. Inspect the label. By law, it must include the honey’s country of origin. The highest-quality honey typically comes from Argentina, Canada, and the United States. And as for the location of the packer: if it’s a distant place you’ve never heard of, that’s a red flag.

2. Look for a stamp of approval. Certification programs like True Source Honey investigate honey supply chains abroad. If honey passes the test, you’ll be able to tell by the certified logo on the label.

3. Do your research. If you’re curious about a honey product or ingredient, you can call the collector or manufacturer and find out more information.

4. Check out your local farmer’s market. That way, you can talk to the beekeeper in person.

https://wamu.org/story/18/03/27/pollinator-judgement-day/

Friday
Apr062018

Bee Swarms Work Like Giant Brains

Video by Hashem Al ghaili    Published 4/4/18

Saturday
Mar312018

LACBA Meeting: Monday, April 2, 2018

Our next meeting will be held Monday, April 2, 2018.
Open Board Meeting: 6:30PM
General Meeting: 7:00PM
Location:
Mount Olive Lutheran Church (Shilling Hall)
3561 Foothill Blvd.
La Crescenta, CA 91214

Meetings of the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association are open to the public. All are welcome!

Saturday
Mar312018

St. Ambrose - The Honey Tongued Doctor

Historical Honeybee Articles - Beekeeping History

From the Easter Series

St. Ambrose was born in Gaul in 340. There is a legend that as an infant, a swarm of bees settled on his face while he lay in his cradle, leaving behind a drop of honey. His father considered this a sign of his future eloquence and honeyed tongue. For this reason, bees and beehives often appear in the saint’s symbology.

The word for 'food of the gods' in Latin is ambrosia. Some scholars have speculated that ambrosia refers to honey or a honey-derived drink, such as mead (honey-wine). The title "Honey Tongued Doctor," initially bestowed because of his speaking and preaching ability, led to the use of a beehive and bees in his iconography, symbols which also indicate wisdom. This led to his association with bees, beekeepers, chandlers, wax refiners, etc.

Historical Honeybee Articles: https://www.facebook.com/Historical.Honeybee.Articles