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This is the official website for the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association, established in 1873. We are a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization.

LA COUNTY FAIR - BEE BOOTH

Equipment, Supplies (Local)


Welcome to the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association!

For over 130 years the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association has been serving the Los Angeles Beekeeping Community. Our group membership is composed of commercial and small scale beekeepers, bee hobbyists, and bee enthusiasts. So whether you came upon our site by design or just 'happened' to find us - welcome! Our primary purpose is the care and welfare of the honeybee. We achieve this through education of ourselves and the general public, supporting honeybee research, and practicing responsible beekeeping in an urban environment. 

"The bee is more honored than other animals, not because she labors, but because she labors for others."  Saint John Chrysostom 




Next LACBA Meeting:
 
Monday, October 2, 2017. Meeting: 7PM. Open Board Meeting: 6:30PM. (NOTE: There will not be an LACBA Meeting in September. We'll be sharing our beekeeping experience and knowledge at the LA County Fair Bee Booth. Buzz By, Say Hi!)

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101:
 Class #7, Saturday, October 14, 2017, 9AM-Noon, hosted at The Valley Hive. See our Beekeeping Class 101 page for details & directions. BEE SUITS REQUIRED. There will not be a class in September. We'll be at the LA County Fair Bee Booth.

Check out our Facebook page for lots of info and updates on bees; and please remember to LIKE US: https://www.facebook.com/losangelesbeekeeping 

THE LATEST BUZZ:  

Monday
Jul022012

Bees Shed Light on Human Sweet Perception & Metabolic Disorders

Researchers identify connection between sugar sensitivity, diabetic physiology and metabolism      (The following is brought to us by the American Bee Journal  July 2, 2012)

TEMPE, Ariz. – Scientists at Arizona State University have discovered that honey bees may teach us about basic connections between taste perception and metabolic disorders in humans. By experimenting with honey bee genetics, researchers have identified connections between sugar sensitivity, diabetic physiology and carbohydrate metabolism. Bees and humans may partially share these connections.

In a study published in the open-access journal PLoS Genetics (Public Library of Science), Gro Amdam, an associate professor, and Ying Wang, a research scientist, in the School of Life Sciences in ASU's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, explain how for the first time, they've successfully inactivated two genes in the bees' "master regulator" module that controls food-related behaviors. By doing so, researchers discovered a possible molecular link between sweet taste perception and the state of internal energy.

"A bee's sensitivity to sugar reveals her attitude towards food, how old the bee is when she starts searching for nectar and pollen, and which kind of food she prefers to collect," said Wang, lead author of the paper. "By suppressing these two 'master' genes, we discovered that bees can become more sensitive to sweet taste. But interestingly, those bees also had very high blood sugar levels, and low levels of insulin, much like people who have Type 1 diabetes."

In Amdam's honey bee lab at ASU, scientists suppressed two genes including vitellogenin, which is similar to a human gene called apolipoprotein B, and ultraspiracle, which partners with an insect hormone that has some functions in common with the human thyroid hormone. The team is the first in the world to accomplish this double gene-suppressing technique. Researchers used this method to understand how the master regulator works.

"Now, if one can use the bees to understand how taste perception and metabolic syndromes are connected, it's a very useful tool," said Amdam, who also has a honey bee laboratory at the Norwegian University of Life Sciences. "Most of what we know about deficits in human perceptions is from people who are very sick or have had a brain trauma. We know shockingly little about people in this area."

The researchers are now considering how, exactly, the bees' sweet taste was enhanced by the experiment. The most metabolically active tissue of the bee, called the fat body, may hold the key. The fat body is similar to the liver and abdominal fat in humans, in that it helps store nutrients and create energy.

Amdam explains that taste perception evolved as a survival mechanism, for bees as well as for people. For example, bitter foods may be poisonous or sweet taste may signal foods rich in calories for energy. For all animals, taste perception must communicate properly with one's internal energetic state to control food intake and maintain normal life functions. Without this, poorly functioning taste perception can contribute to unhealthy eating behaviors and metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity.

"From this study, we realized we can take advantage of honey bees in understanding how food-related behaviors interact with internal metabolism, as well as how to manipulate these food-related behaviors in order to control metabolic disorders," added Amdam.  

Subscribe to the American Bee Journal and sign up for ABJ Extra


Related articles:
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/247345.php  

http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1112648921/bees-have-a-sweet-tooth-too/ 

http://sols.asu.edu/news/2012/28_news_12.php

Honey bees may help scientists understand how food-related behaviors interact with internal metabolism and how to manipulate those behaviors to control metabolic disorders.

(Photo by Christofer Bang)

 

 

 

 

Saturday
Jun302012

Beekeeping Class Sunday, July 1, 2012 9am-12pm

Reminder: Sunday, July 1, 2012 is our next Beekeeping 101 Class.

The topic will be Harvesting and Extracting. For details:
http://www.losangelescountybeekeepers.com/beekeeping-classes/ 

Saturday
Jun302012

12 Million Pounds Illegal Honey = 5 Years Jail

Ex-Honey Import Worker Gets 2 Years For Skirting Duties. Another gets 5 years.

Law360, Chicago (June 22, 2012, 4:16 PM ET) -- An Illinois federal judge sentenced a former honey import worker to two years in prison Friday for participating in a scheme to avoid nearly $1.5 million in anti-dumping duties by falsely declaring the origin of Chinese honey, a charge stemming from a larger probe into an alleged honey smuggling ring. 

Read more...

Information provided by True Source Honey

Available online at:  http://home.ezezine.com/1636/1636-2012.06.29.11.02.archive.html

(The above brought us by CATCH THE BUZZ (Kim Flottum) Bee Culture, The Magazine of American Beekeeping, published by A.I. Root Company.)


Thursday
Jun282012

LACBA Buzzings!!! Newsletter June, 2012 Meeting

Buzzings!!! Newsletter from our June, 2012 Meeting is now ready for your reading enjoyment. Thank you to LACBA Secretary, Stacy McKenna, on a wonderful job. Some of the topics include: Bear fence, nectar flow, white fuzzy mold looking stuff, and much more. 

Thursday
Jun282012

Parasitic Varroa Destructor Mite's Role in Collapse of Honey Bee Colonies

Two High-Impact Journals Publish New Papers on the Parasitic Varroa destructor Mite's Role in Collapse of Honey Bee Colonies 
 

NEW YORKJune 28, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The following is a Statement by Dr. Peter Daszak, President, EcoHealth Alliance:

EcoHealth Alliance, an organization with a long history of ground-breaking work on species declines by our disease discovery experts, welcomes the publication of two new papers on the critical issue of honey bee colony declines, focusing on the role of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor. The mite was introduced in South America in the late 1970s, across Europe in the late 1970s and early 1980s, the United States in 1987, and Hawaii in 2007.

The papers are in high-impact journals Science and PLoS Pathogens, both highly-respected among disease ecologists and other scientists. Read more...