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This is the official website for the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association, established in 1873. We are a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization.

Bare Bees:
kevin.heydman@gmail.com
Bill's Bees
Holly Hawk 626-807-0572
The Valley Hive 

Equipment, Supplies (Local)
LA COUNTY FAIR - BEE BOOTH


Welcome to the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association!

For over 130 years the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association has been serving the Los Angeles Beekeeping Community. Our group membership is composed of commercial and small scale beekeepers, bee hobbyists, and bee enthusiasts. So whether you came upon our site by design or just 'happened' to find us - welcome! Our primary purpose is the care and welfare of the honeybee. We achieve this through education of ourselves and the general public, supporting honeybee research, and practicing responsible beekeeping in an urban environment. 

"The bee is more honored than other animals, not because she labors, but because she labors for others."  Saint John Chrysostom 



Next LACBA Meeting:
Monday, May 7, 2018. General Meeting: 7PM. Open Board Meeting: 6:30PM.  

Next LACBA Beekeeping Class 101:
Sunday, April 15, 2018, 9AM-Noon at The Valley Hive.

Check out our Facebook page for lots of info and updates on bees; and please remember to LIKE US: https://www.facebook.com/losangelesbeekeeping 

THE LATEST BUZZ:  

Tuesday
Sep112012

Tell EPA Honey Bees Can't Wait - Ban Clothianidin

SaveOurEnvironment.org

The pesticide clothianidin may be killing our honey bees off by the billions, destroying a key species and endangering our food supply in the process.

The EPA wants to wait until 2018 to review the safety of this suspiciously approved pesticide but our honey bees can't wait 6 more years. And every bee colony that collapses threatens the future of our food supply...

France, Italy, Slovenia, and Germany have already banned clothianidin over concerns of its role in Colony Collapse Disorder.

Ask the EPA to ban the use of this pesticide without delay.

Tuesday
Sep112012

AFB's Conversation with a Beekeeper Webinar - Tuesday, 9/11/12

Reminder: Register Today for ABF's Conversation with a Beekeeper Webinar Series - Beekeeping 101: Fall Hive Management

Next Session to be Held on Tuesday, September 11, 2012  5:00 p.m. PT/8:00 p.m ET

The ABF Education Committee has been hard at work developing new ways to keep its members engaged and informed in between ABF annual conferences each year. To this end, the ABF is pleased to announce a special nine-part series within the "Conversation with a Beekeeper" Webinar series. This series will be titled "Beekeeping 101" and will feature Dr. Roger Hoopingarner, professor emeritus at Michigan State University. Whether you are brand new to the world of beekeeping or you just need to have a refresher course, this "Beekeeping 101" series will be a great educational experience with many topics focused on the biology and management of honey bees. 

Learn more and register

Monday
Sep102012

Honey & Lemon Grass Tea Cupcakes

The following is brought to us by the National Honey Board!  September 2012

September is National Honey Month and what better way than to celebrate with the most popular honey recipes of the year.  We have searched high and low to bring you the top five recipes on our website and hopefully, you can find more than one that interests you.

The National Honey Board (NHB) has always recognized the importance of honey bees and the benefits of honey. So, in 1989, the NHB worked with the U.S. Department of Agriculture to give honey the praise that it’s due and September was officially deemed National Honey Month. We’re sure some of you are wondering, Why September? The answer’s quite fitting, really – it’s because much of our U.S. honey is harvested during this time.
 
Americans consume approximately 1.3 pounds of honey per person annually, and now more than ever, people are realizing the incredible versatility of this all-natural ingredient. From the kitchen pantry to the bathroom vanity and beyond, honey plays a valuable role in our everyday lives. (Find out more by visiting our Benefits of Honey page.)"

Honey & Lemon Grass Tea Cupcakes
          (Makes 12-14 cupcakes) 

  • 1 green tea bag
  • 1/2 cup boiling water
  • 2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • Zest and juice (1/4 cup) of one lemon
  • 1/4 cup buttermilk
  • 1/2 cup butter, softened
  • 3/4 cup Orange Blossom honey
  • 2 large eggs 

Preheat oven to 350°F. Pour boiling water over tea bag and steep 3 minutes. Remove tea bag and allow tea to cool. Sift together flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt; set aside. In a liquid measure, combine green tea, lemon zest and juice, and buttermilk; set aside. In a mixing bowl, cream butter until fluffy. Add honey; mix well. Add eggs, one at a time. Add half of the reserved dry ingredients to the butter mixture; mix on low until just combined. With mixer running on low, slowly add the lemon tea mixture. Add remaining dry ingredients until just combined. Fill paper-lined muffin tins 2/3 full. Bake 18-22 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in center of a muffin comes out clean. Remove to wire rack; cool. Frost and decorate with Honey Lemon Frosting and Candied Lemon Slices (below), if desired. Note: Any mild-flavored honey such as Clover may be used.

Candied Lemon Slices and Honey Lemon Frosting

  • 4 cups powered sugar, sifted
  • 1/4 cup lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup Orange Blossom honey
  • 1 lemon, thinkly sliced
  • 1/2 cup butter, softened
  • 1/2 teaspoon lemon zest
Preheat oven to 200°F. Pour honey in a small skillet and add lemon slices in a single layer. Bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat and simmer for 15 to 20 minutes, turning slices occasionally. Remove from heat; reserve syrup. Place slices on a parchment-lined cookie sheet and bake 10 minutes. Turn slices and bake an additional 10 minutes or until slices are dry. In a mixing bowl, cream butter until light and fluffy. Add 2 cups of powdered sugar; mix well. Slowly add cooled reserved syrup and lemon juice and zest; mix well. Add remaining powdered sugar; beat well. Note: Any mild-flavored honey such as Clover may be used.

 

Sunday
Sep092012

LA County Fair - Bee Booth (Learn about Bees)

Visit the LA County Fair Bee Booth and Learn about Bees! Now thru Sept. 30 (Wed-Sun).

Did You Know!!!

Honey bees have been around for millions of years.

Honey bees can fly at speeds of up to 15 miles per hour.

A honey bee colony can contain up to 60,000 bees at its peak.

A single honey bee produces about 1/12th teaspoon of honey in her lifetime.

A queen honey bee stores a lifetime supply of sperm.

A queen honey bee lays between 1,500-2,500 eggs a day and can lay up to a million eggs in her lifetime.

All the honey bee workers are female.

The drones, which are the only male honey bees in a hive, die immediately after mating.

Honey bees maintain a constant temperature of about 93º F within the hive year-round.

An industrious worker bee may visit 2,000 flowers per day. 

Learn more about the honey bees, pollination, and the important role bees play in our lives. Take home some local honey! Enjoy honey stix!!!

Enjoy the amazing photography of photo-journalist Kodua Galieti

Visit the LA County Fair!!!!  BUZZ BY - SAY HI!!!

Friday
Sep072012

SF State Biologists Tag "Zombees" To Track Their Flight


ZomBeeWatch.org team is outfitting infected honeybees with tiny radio trackers to learn more about parasitized honeybees

SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 6, 2012 -- After last year's accidental discovery of "zombie"-like bees infected with a fly parasite, SF State researchers are conducting an elaborate experiment to learn more about the plight of the honey bees.

The scientists are tagging infected bees with tiny radio trackers, and monitoring the bees' movements in and out of a specially designed hive on top of the Hensill Hall biology building on campus. At the same time, they are monitoring hives on campus and on the roof of the San Francisco Chronicle's offices for further signs of the mysterious parasite and encouraging the public to participate through a new website ZomBeeWatch.org.

After being parasitized by the Apocephalus borealis fly, the bees abandon their hives and congregate near outside lights, moving in increasingly erratic circles on the ground before dying. The phenomenon was first discovered on campus by SF Professor of Biology John Hafernik, and reported last year in the research journal PLoS ONE, with former SF State master's student Andrew Core as lead author.

It's unclear yet how big of a threat the emerging fly parasite might be to the health of honey bee colonies, or if the parasite is linked to the colony collapse disorder that has devastated honey bee colonies in the United States, say Hafernik and colleagues.

To learn more about how the parasitic fly affects the bees' behavior, the scientists have built a system to track the movements of infected bees in and out of a hive. Each bee has a set of tiny radio frequency trackers -- each no bigger than a fleck of glitter -- attached to the top of its thorax. The bees leave and return to the hive through a small tube outfitted with dual laser readers that interact with the individual trackers.

The readers, which operate in a similar way to barcode scanners in a grocery checkout lane, create "virtually a 24-hour record of bees going in and out of the hive to forage," said Christopher Quock, an SF State master's biology student working on the hive's design together with bee keeper Robert MacKimmie.

Knowing exactly when bees leave--and whether they come back--is important for understanding how and when the parasites might cause the bees to abandon their hives, Quock explained. The original study found bees disoriented and dying at night, for instance, but the researchers aren't sure whether the infected bees only leave their hives to fly in the dark.

Quock's challenge has been to create a hive design where the bees "still have room to do their normal behavior." To get a unique identification and time stamp for each bee, he said, the insects have to pass one at a time under the laser readers through a narrow passage.

Quock, who began work on the bees as an undergraduate, has also been perfecting a method for studying infected bees in the lab. "Hopefully in the long run, this information might help us understand how much of a health concern these flies are for the bees, and if they truly do impede their foraging behavior," he said. "We also want to know whether there are any weak links in the chain of interactions between these flies and honey bees that we could exploit to control the spread of this parasite."

In addition to understanding how parasitism affects foraging behavior, Andrew Zink, SF State assistant professor of biology and Quock's advisor, said that the tracking project might eventually shed light on how the infected bees behave inside the hive. "We are also interested in knowing if parasitized foragers are the recipients of aggression by other workers, for example if they're expelled from the hive, or if parasitized foragers behave in ways that disrupt hive productivity."

If enough of the parasitized bees do the wrong "waggle" dances to send unparasitized foragers off in the wrong directions for food, or distract unparasitized foragers through antagonistic interactions, the hive's productivity could falter. Combined with the premature deaths of the infected foragers, Zink said, these within-hive effects "would represent a two-fold cost of fly parasitism for the hive."

The radio tracking study "could give us a hint" as to why parasitism alters bee behavior, Hafernik said. "It might just be that having a maggot in the back is uncomfortable."

The PLoS ONE study was heavily covered in the media and some unusual outlets. "Our study got picked up on zombie discussion boards, and zombie blogs," Hafernik recalled. "And for the most part the discussion was all very respectful and zombie lovers were interested."

The researchers hope to capitalize on the interest in the bees with a citizen science project called ZomBee Watch. The project encourages bee watchers to help map the parasite's spread by uploading photos of possible parasitized bees to a central website.

(The above brought to us by the American Bee Journal.)

Subscribe to the American Bee Journal and sign up for ABJ Extra

Also see: http://arstechnica.com/science/2012/09/biologists-tag-zombees-with-radio-trackers-to-monitor-parasitic-infection/