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This is the official website for the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association, established in 1873. We are a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization.

Equipment, Supplies (Local)
LA COUNTY FAIR - BEE BOOTH


Welcome to the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association!

For over 130 years the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association has been serving the Los Angeles Beekeeping Community. Our group membership is composed of commercial and small scale beekeepers, bee hobbyists, and bee enthusiasts. So whether you came upon our site by design or just 'happened' to find us - welcome! Our primary purpose is the care and welfare of the honeybee. We achieve this through education of ourselves and the general public, supporting honeybee research, and practicing responsible beekeeping in an urban environment. 

"The bee is more honored than other animals, not because she labors, but because she labors for others."  Saint John Chrysostom 



Next LACBA Meeting:
Monday, March 5, 2018. General Meeting: 7PM. Open Board Meeting: 6:30PM.  

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101:
3rd Sunday of the month beginning February 18, 2018, 9AM-Noon at The Valley Hive.

Check out our Facebook page for lots of info and updates on bees; and please remember to LIKE US: https://www.facebook.com/losangelesbeekeeping 

THE LATEST BUZZ:  

Wednesday
Jun062012

In the Blink of an Eye

By Kathy Keatley Garvey (Bug Squad - Happenings in the Insect World) June 5, 2012

In the blink of an eye, they visit the rockpurslane (Calandrinia grandiflora).

Now you see them, now you don't.

They're a  sweat bee, a little larger than most sweat bees, but a little smaller than a honey bee.

Halictus farinosus (family Halictidae) are often see pollinating blueberry fields,  foraging among  California golden poppies,  and visiting members of the sunflower family, to name a few.

They're commonly called "sweat bees" because...

Read more... 

Visit the Kathy Keatley Garvey Bug Squad blog at: http://ucanr.org/blogs/bugsquad/

Visit the Kathy Keatley Garvey website at: http://kathygarvey.com/

Check out the marvelous inspirational article about Kathy Keatley Garvey in the June 2012 issue of the American Bee Journal. It features more beautiful bee photography by Kathy Keatley Garvey and a walk in her garden.

Tuesday
Jun052012

Getting the Red Out

By Kathy Keatley Garvey (Bug Squad - Happenings in the Insect World) June 4, 2012

"Where do bees get red pollen?" we were asked. "We've seen bees packing blood-red pollen at the entrance to a hive."

Well, one flower that yields red pollen is rock purslane (Calandrinia grandiflora). It's a drought-tolerant perennial, a succulent.

Interestingly enough, the blossom itself is neon pink or magenta, the kind that cyclists wear to be seen. 

Rock purslane attracts its share of honey bees, bumble bees, carpenter bees, leafcutter bees...

Read more: http://ucanr.org/blogs/blogcore/postdetail.cfm?postnum=7640

Visit the Kathy Keatley Garvey Bug Squad blog at: http://ucanr.org/blogs/bugsquad/

Visit the Kathy Keatley Garvey website at: http://kathygarvey.com/

Check out the marvelous inspirational article about Kathy Keatley Garvey in the June 2012 issue of the American Bee Journal. It features more beautiful bee photography by Kathy Keatley Garvey and a walk in her garden.

Monday
Jun042012

Beyond Pesticides Forum 

The 30th National Pesticide Forum was held on March 30-31, 2012 at Yale University. 

You can read about the forum and view videos at: http://www.beyondpesticides.org/pollinators/index.htm#video

Some of the topics include:

Poisoning of the Bees (Dave Hackenberg, beekeeper)

Neonicotinoid Pesticides and Bees, substitute lecture (Christian Krupke, PhD with Greg Hunt, Purdue University)

Protecting Pollinators: Beekeeping and beyond (Workshop)

To view more videos from the forum:http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL762B9D6032F815D6&feature=plcp

 

Monday
Jun042012

Bees Can Detect Medfly-Infested Oranges

Use of Honey Bees (Apis mellifera L.) to Detect the Presence of Mediterranean Fruit Fly (Ceratitis capitata Wiedemann) Larvae in Valencia Oranges

Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, Early View 

Abstract

BACKGROUND: When fruit deteriorates a characteristic profile of volatile chemicals is produced that is different from that produced by healthy fruits. The identification of such chemicals allows the possibility of monitoring the fruit for early signs of deterioration with biological sensors. The use of honey bees and other insects as biological sensors is well known. This study aimed to identify the volatiles produced by oranges infested with larvae of the Mediterranean fruit fly and to test the ability of honey bees, conditioned to this volatile chemical profile, to detect such oranges.

Read more...

Monday
Jun042012

Mite Helps a Bee-killing Virus Spread

(The following brought to us by the American Bee Journal.) June 4, 2012

The spread of a parasitic mite across Hawaiian honeybee colonies has enabled a virus to thrive within colonies of these valuable insects, researchers report. In other parts of the world, the appearance of both the mite and the virus has coincided with major colony deaths, though this has only occurred on Hawaii where the mites have been established for at least two years. The mite's arrival there, where it has only spread on certain islands, is relatively recent. Stephen Martin and colleagues took advantage of this unusual opportunity to monitor Hawaiian honeybees during the invasion and learn how the virus was spreading and evolving. Deformed wing virus (DWV) can infect bees by itself, but the Varroa mite helps things along by acting as a host and incubator.

The mites' feeding behavior also allows the virus to be transmitted directly into the bees' circulation system. The authors report that the introduction of the Varroa mite has increased the prevalence of  DWV from about 10 percent to 100 percent within honeybee colonies. The amount of virus in the bees' bodies also skyrocketed, while the diversity of the viral strains did the opposite. In fact, just one DWV strain is now dominant in Varroa-infected colonies. The authors conclude that the global spread of Varroa has selected DWV variants that have emerged to allow DWV to become one of the most widely distributed and contagious insect viruses on the planet.

Click here  to see a digital sample of the American Bee Journal.
 
To subscribe to the American Bee Journal click here and choose digital or the printed version.