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This is the official website for the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association, established in 1873. We are a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization.

LA COUNTY FAIR - BEE BOOTH

Equipment, Supplies (Local)


 


Welcome to the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association!

For over 130 years the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association has been serving the Los Angeles Beekeeping Community. Our group membership is composed of commercial and small scale beekeepers, bee hobbyists, and bee enthusiasts. So whether you came upon our site by design or just 'happened' to find us - welcome! Our primary purpose is the care and welfare of the honeybee. We achieve this through education of ourselves and the general public, supporting honeybee research, and practicing responsible beekeeping in an urban environment. 

"The bee is more honored than other animals, not because she labors, but because she labors for others."  Saint John Chrysostom 




Next LACBA Meeting:
 
Monday, October 2, 2017. Meeting: 7PM. Open Board Meeting: 6:30PM. (NOTE: There will not be an LACBA Meeting in September. We'll be sharing our beekeeping experience and knowledge at the LA County Fair Bee Booth. Buzz By, Say Hi!)

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101:
 Class #7, Saturday, October 14, 2017, 9AM-Noon, hosted at The Valley Hive. See our Beekeeping Class 101 page for details & directions. BEE SUITS REQUIRED. There will not be a class in September. We'll be at the LA County Fair Bee Booth.

Check out our Facebook page for lots of info and updates on bees; and please remember to LIKE US: https://www.facebook.com/losangelesbeekeeping 

THE LATEST BUZZ:  

Friday
Jan062012

Corn Seed Pesticide Kills Bees

By Alan Harman  (1/6/12)

Corn Seed Treatment As Lethal As It Gets For Honey Bees All Season Long, And Long After The Season Has Gone. It Just Keeps On Killing.

Frightening new research shows honey bees are being exposed to deadly neonicotinoid insecticides and several other agricultural pesticides throughout their foraging period. The research, published in the scientific journal PLoS One says extremely high levels of clothianidin and thiamethoxam were found in planter exhaust material produced during the planting of treated maize seed. The work, which could raise new questions about the long-term survival of the honey bee, was conducted by Christian H. Krupke of the Department of Entomology at Purdue University, Brian D. Eitzer of the Department of Analytical Chemistry at the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station and Krispn Given of Purdue.

Neonicotinoids  were found in the soil of each field we sampled, including  unplanted fields, they report. Dandelions visited by foraging bees growing near these fields were found to contain neonicotinoids as well. “This indicates deposition of neonicotinoids on the flowers, uptake by the root system, or both,” the report says. “Dead bees collected near hive entrances during the spring sampling period were found to contain clothianidin as well.” Read more: http://home.ezezine.com/1636/1636-2012.01.04.21.46.archive.html

 

Thursday
Jan052012

Zombie Flies Invade the Central Coast

By Rachel Ramirez  1/5/12  Central Coast News

Prunedale, Calif. - This may sound a little nutty, but "zombie" attacks are spreading from the Bay Area to the Central Coast.

A parasitic scuttle fly, dubbed as a "zombie fly," is attacking honeybees and taking over their body like a zombie before a slow death.

Prunedale beekeeper Ron Flint has been rescuing and caring for bees for three years.  

But upon the new year, he started noticing some odd behavior.

"New Years day I was barbequing. I had flood lights on and the bees were bouncing off the flood lights," said Flint.

Flying towards the light, abandoning the beehive, falling over and crawling in circles are all symptoms of a "zombie-like" parasite attack. Read more: http://www.kionrightnow.com/story/16458259/zombie-flies-invade-the-central-coast

Monday
Jan022012

Deadly Parasite Turns Honey Bees Into Zombies

Mercury News    (1/03/12)

Is it a trailer for a horror flick? Or is the parasite the reason for the devastating honey bee population drop in recent years? Scientists believe they have found a parasite that causes honey bees to abandon their hives, lose their sense of reality, and rush towards bright lights in a suicidal frenzy.

The new study by San Francisco State University researchers has discovered this anomaly that causes bees to become zombie-like. Biology professor John Hafernick, lead investigator and president of the California Academy of Sciences states that tiny flies have deposited eggs into the bees’ abdomen. In a “drunken stupor” the honey bees walk in circles, lose their sense of direction and their legs become paralyzed.

Hafernick stated, “They (the infected bees) kept stretching them (their legs) out and then fell over.. It really painted a picture of something like a zombie.” Read more: http://www.allvoices.com/contributed-news/11218657-deadly-parasite-turns-honeybees-into-zombies

Monday
Nov072011

Tests Show Most Store Honey Isn't Honey

More than three-fourths of the honey sold in U.S. grocery stores isn't exactly what the bees produce, according to testing done exclusively for Food Safety News.
The results show that the pollen frequently has been filtered out of products labeled "honey."
The removal of these microscopic particles from deep within a flower would make the nectar flunk the quality standards set by most of the world's food safety agencies.
The food safety divisions of the  World Health Organization, the European Commission and dozens of others also have ruled that without pollen there is no way to determine whether the honey came from legitimate and safe sources. Read more: http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2011/11/tests-show-most-store-honey-isnt-honey/

 

Friday
Oct212011

Farmers Try to Restore Devastated Bee Population

DEL REY, Calif. (AP) — Dozens of farmers in California and other states have started replacing some of their crops with flowers and shrubs that are enticing to bees, hoping to lower their pollination costs and restore a bee population devastated in the past few years.

On an October morning, peach farmer Mas Masumoto planted more than 3 acres of wild rose, aster, sage, manzanita and other shrubs and trees in a former grape field near Fresno, Calif.

To the north near Modesto, Calif., David Moreland was preparing to plant wildflower seeds and flowering shrubs in a ravine along his 400-acre almond orchard. Read more: http://www.foodmanufacturing.com/news/2011/10/farmers-try-restore-devastated-bee-population