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This is the official website for the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association established in 1873.

 

Bare Bees:
kevin.heydman@gmail.com
Bill's Bees
Holly Hawk 626-807-0572
The Valley Hive 

LA COUNTY FAIR - BEE BOOTH


Welcome to the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association!

For over 130 years the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association has been serving the Los Angeles Beekeeping Community. Our group membership is composed of commercial and small scale beekeepers, bee hobbyists, and bee enthusiasts. So whether you came upon our site by design or just 'happened' to find us - welcome! Our primary purpose is the care and welfare of the honeybee. We achieve this through education of ourselves and the general public, supporting honeybee research, and practicing responsible beekeeping in an urban environment. 

"The bee is more honored than other animals, not because she labors, but because she labors for others."  Saint John Chrysostom 



Next LACBA Meeting:
Monday, August 6, 2018. General Meeting: 7PM. Open Board Meeting: 6:30PM.  

Next LACBA Beekeeping Class 101:
Sunday, July 15, 2018, 9AM-Noon at The Valley Hive. BEE SUITS REQUIRED!

Check out our Facebook page for lots of info and updates on bees; and please remember to LIKE US: https://www.facebook.com/losangelesbeekeeping 

THE LATEST BUZZ:  

Wednesday
May232012

Cornell Study Values Pollinated crops at over $15 Billion

Published in PLoS One By Nick Calderone

Insect Pollinated Crops, Insect Pollinators and US Agriculture: Trend Analysis of Aggregate Data for the Period 1992–2009.

Abstract

In the US, the cultivated area (hectares) and production (tonnes) of crops that require or benefit from insect pollination (directly dependent crops: apples, almonds, blueberries, cucurbits, etc.) increased from 1992, the first year in this study, through 1999 and continued near those levels through 2009; aggregate yield (tonnes/hectare) remained unchanged. 

The value of directly dependent crops attributed to all insect pollination (2009 USD) decreased from $14.29 billion in 1996, the first year for value data in this study, to $10.69 billion in 2001, but increased thereafter, reaching $15.12 billion by 2009.

The values attributed to honey bees and non-Apispollinators followed similar patterns, reaching $11.68 billion and $3.44 billion, respectively, by 2009. The cultivated area of crops grown from seeds resulting from insect pollination (indirectly dependent crops: legume hays, carrots, onions, etc.) was stable from 1992 through 1999, but has since declined. Production of those crops also declined, albeit not as rapidly as the decline in cultivated area; this asymmetry was due to increases in aggregate yield.

Read the entire paper here.

(The above brought us by CATCH THE BUZZ (Kim Flottum) Bee Culture, The Magazine of American Beekeeping, published by A.I. Root Company.) 

Wednesday
May232012

Conversation with a Beekeeper Webinar–Register Today for June 11 Session

BEES Network: Learn How to Grow Your Knowledge and Understanding of Bees and Beekeeping 

Monday, June 11, 2012 8:00 p.m. ET/7:00 p.m. CT/6:00 p.m. MT/5:00 p.m. PT/4:00 p.m. AKST/3:00 p.m. HST

Dr. David Tarpy, associate professor and extension apiculturist, Department of Entomology, North Carolina State University

The ABF Education Committee has been hard at work developing new ways to keep its members engaged and informed in between ABF annual conferences each year. To this end, the ABF is pleased to announce another session in the educational Webinar series titled “Conversation with a Beekeeper.” Plans are in place to host these sessions every few months.
The next session will be held on Monday, June 11, 2012, at 8:00 p.m. ET, and will feature Dr. David Tarpy, associate professor and extension apiculturist, Department of Entomology, North Carolina State University. 

SESSION DETAILS: BEES Network: Learn How to Grow Your Knowledge and Understanding of Bees and Beekeeping

 

Join us as we learn more about an exciting new program – the Beekeeper Education & Engagement System (BEES). Under the direction of Dr. David Tarpy, associate professor and extension apiculturist, Department of Entomology, North Carolina State University, the BEES Network is an online resource for beekeepers at all levels. The system is entirely Internet based and aims to foster an online learning community among beekeepers. The structure of the BEES Network is broken into three ascending levels of complexity (Beginner, Advanced and Ambassador) and three general areas of content (honey bee biology, honey bee management and the honey bee industry). And, through the end of the year, ABF members will be given the opportunity to participate in the program at a 20-percent discount. Read more:  Beekeeper Education & Engagement System 

IMPORTANT SESSION FORMAT / REGISTRATION INFORMATION

The sessions will be conducted via the Cisco WebEx online meetings platform, which means the presenter will have a visual presentation, as well as an audio presentation. You do not have to have access to a computer to participate! As long as you have access to a phone you can listen in to the session.

Please note that space is limited and open to the first 100 ABF members. Reserve your spot today by e-mailing Grayson Daniels, ABF membership coordinator, at graysondaniels@abfnet.org or by calling the ABF offices at 404.760.2875.

Registration will close 48 business hours before the scheduled session. Twenty-four hours before the session the registered participant will receive an e-mail confirming participation, along with the necessary information to join the session. If an e-mail address is not provided, the ABF will call the participant with the information. Questions for the speaker must be submitted 48 business hours in advance to Grayson Daniels.

If you are unable to make the session, don’t fear! Each session will be recorded and available on the ABF Web site for member-only access.

This Session Sponsored By: Nozevit – A Member of the CompleteBee.com Family

Nozevit is an all-natural plant polyphenol honey bee food supplement that is added to sugar syrup feed. Nozevit is produced from certified organic substances according to a decades old traditional European recipe. Healthy bee colonies build brood faster in the spring, and will winter extremely well when their intestinal integrity is intact. Exceptional colonies can be built using all-natural Nozevit as a food supplement for intestinal cleansing, thereby reducing the need of chemical treatments for internal ailments.

Tuesday
May222012

Stan Lee Superhumans Bee Man

From the History Channel 

The renowned superstar of comic book fame turns the spotlight on a beekeeper who takes bee bearding a step up.

Incredible! Informative! Inspirational!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p265QaJ5pdc&feature=youtube_gdata_player

Tuesday
May222012

Allergic Patients Should Be Advised of Anaphylaxis from Bee Pollen

Quantum Day (May 22, 2012)

Bee pollen are pollen granules collected and processed by bees. 

It is collected from flowers during pollination. The pollen contains small amounts of minerals and vitamins and is very high in protein and carbohydrates.

The pollen is made by worker honeybees who pack the collected pollen into granules (pollen balls) with added honey or nectar. The pollen is also mixed with enzymes, fungi and bacteria. This results in pollen that is higher in nutrition than untreated pollen and is the primary source of protein for the hive.

The average composition of bee pollen is said to be 55% carbohydrates, 35% proteins, 3% minerals and vitamins, 2% fatty acids, and 5% of diverse other components.

Bee pollen supplements can cause anaphylactic reactions

Although many people take bee pollen as a health supplement, it can cause severe anaphylactic reactions. However, most people are unaware of the risks, states an article published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Read more: http://www.quantumday.com/

Click to find out more about Bee Pollen (video):
http://www.quantumday.com/2012/05/allergic-patients-should-be-advised-of.html#more

Photos from Quantum


Tuesday
May222012

Bee Pollen Supplements Can Cause Anaphlylactic Reactions

From: The American Bee Journal Extra  May 22, 2012

Although many people take bee pollen as a health supplement, it can cause severe anaphylactic reactions. However, most people are unaware of the risks, states an article published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

A case study in the journal illuminates the possible hazards of ingesting bee pollen. A 30-year-old woman with seasonal allergies but no history of allergies to food, drugs, insects or latex had an anaphylactic reaction after taking bee pollen. She had swelling of the eyelids, lips and throat, difficulty swallowing, hives and other life-threatening symptoms. After emergency treatment and discontinuation of the bee pollen supplements, there were no further reactions.

"Anaphylaxis associated with the consumption of bee pollen has been reported in the literature, but many people remain unaware of this potential hazard," write Dr. Amanda Jagdis, University of British Columbia, and Dr. Gordon Sussman, St. Michael's Hospital and the University of Toronto.

Anaphylactic reactions after ingesting bee pollen have been reported in people with no history of allergies or only seasonal allergies. In a Greek study in which atopic participants underwent skin tests for reactions to bee pollen, 73% (of 145 patients) had positive skin test reactions to one or more types of bee pollen extracts.

"Health care providers should be aware of the potential for reaction, and patients with pollen allergy should be advised of the potential risk when consuming these products — it is not known who will have an allergic reaction upon ingesting bee pollen," conclude the authors.

(The above posted with permission from the American Bee Journal.) 

Click here  to see a digital sample of the American Bee Journal.

To subscribe to the American Bee Journal click here and choose digital or the printed version.