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This is the official website for the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association, established in 1873. We are a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization.

LA COUNTY FAIR - BEE BOOTH

Equipment, Supplies (Local)


 


Welcome to the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association!

For over 130 years the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association has been serving the Los Angeles Beekeeping Community. Our group membership is composed of commercial and small scale beekeepers, bee hobbyists, and bee enthusiasts. So whether you came upon our site by design or just 'happened' to find us - welcome! Our primary purpose is the care and welfare of the honeybee. We achieve this through education of ourselves and the general public, supporting honeybee research, and practicing responsible beekeeping in an urban environment. 

"The bee is more honored than other animals, not because she labors, but because she labors for others."  Saint John Chrysostom 




Next LACBA Meeting:
 
Monday, October 2, 2017. Meeting: 7PM. Open Board Meeting: 6:30PM. (NOTE: There will not be an LACBA Meeting in September. We'll be sharing our beekeeping experience and knowledge at the LA County Fair Bee Booth. Buzz By, Say Hi!)

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101:
 Class #7, Saturday, October 14, 2017, 9AM-Noon, hosted at The Valley Hive. See our Beekeeping Class 101 page for details & directions. BEE SUITS REQUIRED. There will not be a class in September. We'll be at the LA County Fair Bee Booth.

Check out our Facebook page for lots of info and updates on bees; and please remember to LIKE US: https://www.facebook.com/losangelesbeekeeping 

THE LATEST BUZZ:  

Friday
Jul072017

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101: Class #6, Saturday, July 8, 2017, 9am-Noon

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 (Class #6) Saturday, July 8, 2017, 9am-noon
BEE SUIT REQUIRED FOR THIS CLASS.

 THE VALLEY HIVE
9633 BADEN AVENUE
CHATSWORTH, CA 93063
(818) 280-6500

BRING A FOLDING CHAIR. Seating is limited.

For directions and day of class updates contact: The Valley Hive

Click here for more information about our
Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association
Beekeeping Class 101
.

TOPIC: Finding and treating for mites, pros and cons of treatments, and when to treat.

Note from The Valley Hive: Even though The Valley Hive has moved to a new location, LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 will continue at 9633 Baden Avenue from 9-12pm. Our new shop at 10538 Topanga Canyon Blvd will open at 8am on Saturday if anyone needs to purchase a suit or other beekeeping equipment. Suits are required. We will be working inside the hive, so if you have beekeeping tools – smoker, hive tool, bee brush – please bring them to class, along with smoker fuel and a lighter.

Calling all LACBA experienced beekeepers - The Valley Hive could use your help with bee class this year. Thank you!

Thursday
Jul062017

Probiotics Could Improve Survival Rates in Honey Bees Exposed to Pesticides, Study Finds

Science Daily     Source: Lawson Health Research Institute    June 19, 2017

In a new study from Lawson Health Research Institute (Lawson) and Western University, researchers have shown that probiotics can potentially protect honey bees from the toxic effects of pesticides.

Honey bees are critical to agriculture as they pollinate approximately 35 per cent of the global food crop, contributing an estimated $4.39 billion per year to the Canadian economy. Pesticides are currently used to maximize crop yields, but the most common pesticides, neonicotinoid insecticides, are a major factor in colony collapse disorder which is killing honey bee populations.

"The demise of honey bees would be disastrous for humankind. A current dilemma in agriculture is how to prevent bee decline while mitigating crop losses," says Dr. Gregor Reid, Director for the Canadian Centre for Human Microbiome and Probiotic Research at Lawson, and Professor at Western's Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry. "We wanted to see whether probiotics could counter the toxic effects of pesticides and improve honey bee survival."

The study was performed by trainees Brendan Daisley and Mark Trinder in Dr. Reid's lab at St. Joseph's Hospital in London, Ontario. The researchers utilized fruit flies as a well-known model for studying pesticide toxicity in honey bees. Both insects are affected similarly by neonicotinoids, have very similar immune systems, and share many common microbes present in their microbiota -- the collection of microorganisms found in each insect.

The researchers found that fruit flies exposed to one of the world's most commonly used pesticides, imidacloprid (IMI), experienced changes to their microbiota and were more susceptible to infections. The flies were exposed to a comparable amount of pesticide as honey bees in the field.

By administering a specific strain of probiotic lactobacilli, survival among fruit flies exposed to the pesticide improved significantly. The mechanism involved stimulating the immune system through a pathway that insects use to adapt to infection, heat and other stresses.

"Our study showed that probiotic lactobacilli can improve immunity and potentially help honey bees to live longer after exposure to pesticides," says Daisley, an MSc candidate. He notes that probiotic lactobacilli could be easily administered through pollen patties, which are used by beekeepers to provide nutritional support and anti-pesticide effects to honey bees.

Over the winter months, honey bee mortality has been steadily increasing with ranges of 38 to 58 per cent in recent years, two to three times higher than the sustainable level. In Ontario alone, 340 bee keepers reported an abnormally high number of bee deaths, with over 70 per cent of dead bees testing positive for neonicotinoid residues (Government of Ontario).

"While cessation of pesticide use would be ideal, farmers currently have little alternative to obtain the yields that keep their businesses viable," says Dr. Reid. "Until we can cease using pesticides, we need to find ways to protect humans and wildlife against their side effects. Probiotics may prove as an effective protective intervention against colony collapse disorder."

The researchers hope to further study the mechanisms involved in this process and perform field tests on honey bee populations in Ontario.

Story Source: Materials provided by Lawson Health Research Institute. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Journal Reference: Brendan A. Daisley, Mark Trinder, Tim W. McDowell, Hylke Welle, Josh S. Dube, Sohrab N. Ali, Hon S. Leong, Mark W. Sumarah, Gregor Reid. Neonicotinoid-induced pathogen susceptibility is mitigated by Lactobacillus plantarum immune stimulation in a Drosophila melanogaster model. Scientific Reports, 2017; 7 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-02806-w

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170619101827.htm

Wednesday
Jul052017

One Man From The Kulung Culture Harvests Psychotropic Honey That Is Guarded By Capricious Spirits And The World’s Largest Honeybees.

National Geographic Magazine   By Mark Synnott  Photos by Renan Ozturk     July 2017

Mauli Dhan climbs a hundred feet up a bamboo rope ladder to his prize: a hive filled with neurotoxic honey. Smoke from smoldering grass disorients the bees, possibly reducing the number of stings Mauli will suffer. Before he grabs the support rope beside him, a misstep could be fatal.

Three hundred feet in the air, Mauli Dhan dangles on a bamboo rope ladder, surveying the section of granite he must climb to reach his goal: a pulsing mass of thousands of Himalayan giant honeybees. They carpet a crescent-shaped hive stretching almost six feet below a granite overhang. The bees are guarding gallons of a sticky, reddish fluid known as mad honey, which, thanks to its hallucinogenic properties, sells on Asian black markets for $60 to $80 a pound—roughly six times the price of regular Nepali honey.

Himalayan honeybees make several types of honey depending on the season and the elevation of the flowers that produce the nectar they eat. The psychotropic effects of the spring honey result from toxins found in the flowers of massive rhododendron trees, whose bright pink, red, and white blossoms bloom each March and April on north-facing hillsides throughout the Hongu Valley. The Kulung people of eastern Nepal have used the honey for centuries as a cough syrup and an antiseptic, and the beeswax has found its way into workshops in the alleys of Kathmandu, where it is used to cast bronze statues of gods and goddesses. 

360° VIDEO Join photographer Renan Ozturk as he dangles from a cliff to see Mauli Dhan harvest rare honey. To experience the video in 360 degrees, click on the content and drag, or click on the arrows at top left. (Interactivity not an option on some mobile devices.)

Continue reading, view images and breathtaking videos: http://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2017/07/honey-hunters-bees-climbing-nepal/

(Note: At our LACBA meeting July 3, 2017, Jon Reese, brought in this magnificant article from National Geographic. Check it out online, amazing, breathtaking videos, and lots of images.)

Wednesday
Jul052017

2 LSU Researchers Get Nearly $1M to Study Honeybee Stress

U.S. News     June 25, 2017

BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Two Louisiana State University researchers are getting nearly $1 million for a two-year study of how mite treatment and stress affect honeybee health.

Kristen Healy and Daniel Swale are working with U.S. Department of Agriculture researchers in Baton Rouge and the nation's largest beekeeper, the LSU AgCenter said in a news release Thursday.

They'll be studying 400 hives of honeybees owned by Adee Honey Farms of Bruce, South Dakota, including some that are moved to California for the fall almond harvest and then to Mississippi for the winter.

Healy said they will sample pollen, nectar and bees from hives during and at the end of the study.

"We can look at which colonies failed and which ones didn't and quantify which stress variables were more important to the relative health of the bees," Healy said.

LSU is getting $935,000. It's among seven universities getting a total of $6.8 million from the USDA to study pollinators.

Healy will see how bees treated with a mite control product compare to untreated bees.

Swale will study whether the moves make them spend more energy, reducing their fat storage — and if there's a way to boost those fats.

The researchers also are interested how a virus that causes deformed wings is spread.

The grant also includes an extension component so the researchers can determine the best methods to get bee health information to beekeepers and the public.

The USDA estimates honeybees pollinate $15 billion worth of crops.

https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/louisiana/articles/2017-06-25/2-lsu-researchers-get-nearly-1m-to-study-honeybee-stress

Wednesday
Jul052017

LACBA Secretary, Merrill Kruger

Welcome to our new LACBA Secretary, Merrill Kruger. Merrill is an urban beekeeper and an avid advocate of Nature. Although her first hive was started less than 2 years ago, her beekeeping efforts began many years earlier; when she first began planting nectar and pollen rich gardens and encouraging homeowners to remove their lawns in favor of fragrant, floriferous, non-toxic forage for bees, butterflies, birds, and other wildlife. She is the President and Owner of a local Landscape Design, Construction, and Maintenance company, Design by Nature, that specializes in gardening technologies that support healthy lifestyles. Her home garden is a testament of her life's work; water harvesting systems, native, drought tolerant and edible trees and plants, hens, composting and recycled furniture punctuate the property. When she isn't gardening, she loves reading and training an Afro-Brazilian martial art called 'Capoeira' which incorporates traditional musical instruments and rhythms with modern songs to develop expressive and educational performances. 

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