Save the bees! Wait, was that a bee?

TEDxTalks   Joseph Wilson / TEDx USU    December 1, 2016

There is a growing movement around the world to “save the bees.” Unfortunately, misunderstandings about what a bee is and what a bee’s needs are can lead to misguided efforts to save them. Much of the movement has focused on honey bees or bumble bees but has ignored the other 95% of bee species, many of which are important pollinators in our wild lands and in agricultural settings. In order to truly save the bees, we first need to understand them.

Joseph Wilson grew up in Utah and was biologically inclined from birth. At the age of two, he declared to his parents that when he grew up, he wanted to be a lion. While he didn’t quite achieve that goal, his studies at Utah State University provided the training to be the next best thing: a professor of biology. His research focuses primarily on the evolution and ecology of bees and wasps. Joseph says that the lives of these insects provide as much drama, mystery, and humor as any prime time TV show—but without the commercials.

Along with a colleague, Joseph recently authored a book, “The Bees in Your Backyard: A Guide to North America’s Bees.” He has been invited to share his knowledge on NPR, Canada Public Radio, and at speaking events across the country.

Joseph loves that his research enables him to travel around the country with his wife and three children, collecting and photographing the beautiful bees and wasps that live all around us.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MVDXD3oyMJg&sns=fb

Amazing Bee Video!

Apocrita: A Bee Film (Wasps and Bees Fighting in Super Slow Motion)
Filmed and written by Michael N Sutton

Apocrita is suborder of insects in the order Hymenoptera (Bees, wasps, and ants). This film is a product of passion for the honey bee. My last bee film was an educational piece for kids and I wanted to make something that was more in line with my vision this go around. This is an art film. But hopefully you will see the beauty of these insects as I do.

Bees are Biotic pollinators and have a large role in the pollination of many of our fruits, nuts, and flowering plants. Some crops like Almonds are 100% pollinated by Bees. Climate change, chemical dependence in agriculture, habitat destruction, Colony Collapse Disorder are key reasons the honey bee is in decline.

I love bees and have become fond of filming them up close and personal in their various habitats. I do not use a smoker or a bee suit while filming as I feel it impedes the filming process. I filmed this in one day at Hillside Bees in Merrimack NH on a mid-October day. I was surprised to see how many bees were flying around and was even more surprised to see a large amount of wasps trying to steal food from the bees.

To film this I needed to be within a few inches to a few feet to get a close and personal view of their everyday activities. I was a bit worried about the wasps as I am allergic to their stings but was told once that as long as you are not afraid the bees and wasps will not perceive you as a threat. I do not know if that is true or not but this is the first time filming bees that I have not been stung, even being so close to them, so I am now a believer. I had zero fear going in and I think that made for better shots and being comfortable enough to focus on the subject rather than being stung.

For more information on bees The American Bee Keeping Federation is a great start to learning all the facts on not only beekeeping but also legislative activities, news and events in your area ( abfnet.org )

Technical:
DIR/DP/EDIT: Michael N Sutton / Stybe Media, LLC.
Shot on IDT OS7 High-Speed camera with Vedra Cinema Primes (12mm, 25mm, 50mm) & a Canon 100MM Macro IS USM
Music composed by: Kevin Matley (kevinmatley.com)
Track: Rest in Peace
Licensed via: Marmoset Music (marmosetmusic.com)
Special Thanks to:
Matt Kearney of Expert Digital Imaging (expertdigtialimaging.com)
Eric Kessler & Nate Howell of Kessler Crane (kesslercrane.com)
Ryan Avery of Vedra (veydra.com)
FilmConvert (filmconvert.com)
Allen Lindahl of Hillside Bees (hillsidebees.com)
Kevin Matley for his amazing music (kevinmatley.com)
Marmoset Music for licensing (marmosetmusic.com)
Copyright 2017 by Michael N Sutton / Strybe Media, LLC.

The Beekeeper's Son

   A slow moving, sweet ten minute film about bees and family. 

The Beekeeper's Son from Stitch Films on Vimeo

A young boy steals away from a wake and encounters a solitary mourner reminiscing by a lone beehive -- the dead man's son, who has only begun to realise what traditions may have died with his father.

https://vimeo.com/21275398

The Behavioural Ecology of Swarming in Honey Bees

National Honey Show   Published January 6, 2016
A lecture given by Juliana Rangel at the 2015 National Honey Show entitled "The Behavioural Ecology of Swarming in Honey Bees". The National Honey Show gratefully acknowledge the Nineveh Charitable Trust for their support and the sponsorship by Maisemore Apiaries Ltd.

Why Pollination And Pollination Protection Are Important

Bug Squad    By Kathy Keatley Garvey    January 1, 2016

If you haven't already seen it, you need to watch it.
 


"Pollination and Protecting Pollinators" is a 51-minute documentary by Washington State University (WSU) Cooperative Extension that explores how valuable honey bees are, why they're crucial, and what we need to do to protect them.

County Director Timothy Lawrence of Island County, WSU Extension, served as the co-executive producer of the documentary, as well as the writer and the primary  narrator. 

The Whidbey News-Times, in its May 23, 2010 edition, described Lawrence as an expert on honey bee health:

"Tim Lawrence has the credentials of an old-school extension services director, with a master's degree in rural sociology, a doctorate in environmental sciences and 20 years of experience working with extension programs in three states."

Some background: Tim and his wife, noted WSU bee breeder-geneticist Susan Cobey, were formerly based at the University of California, Davis, where Cobey served as the manager of the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. Together they operated a commercial queen production business, Vaca Valley Apiaries, in Vacaville, Solano County.

But back to the documentary.

You'll learn about pollen, nectar and how pollen is transferred. You'll learn why honey bees are considered the best of all the pollinators but why honey bees are not the "best pollinators for some crops" and why.

You'll learn about almond pollination, along with many of the other crops that require bee pollination, including apples, cherries, plums, blueberries and cranberries. No bees? No almonds. No bees? No cranberries.

You'll learn who developed the Langstroth Hive and why it's important. Hint: the Rev. Lorenzo Lorraine Langstroth (1810-1895) discovered "bee space." You'll learn what "bee space" is.

You'll learn what Moses Quinby of New York did. Hint: Quinby (1810-1875) is considered the first commercial beekeeper in the United States. You'll learn how many hives he maintained in the Mohawk Valley region of New York.

You'll learn why Lawrence says "we won't starve if bees disappear."

And finally, you'll learn what you can do to help the bees.

"Do your part and we can all do this together," Lawrence says. Good advice. And timely advice as we begin the new year. 

 

 


Read at: http://ucanr.edu/blogs/blogcore/postdetail.cfm?postnum=19847 

LA County Fair Bee Booth - Weirdest Bees Dance!

Watch the bees perform the Waggle Dance here on the National Geographic video.

Then come to the LA County Fair, visit the Bee Booth, check out the honey bee observation hive, and see if you can spot The World's Weirdest: Honey Bee Dance Moves - The Waggle Dance.  There's only five more days of the fair (Wed-Sun) Sept 23-28). You don't want to miss this rare opportunity to see the honey bees perform The Waggle Dance in person.

http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/weirdest-bees-dance?source=relatedvideo

Bee-Have So We Can Bee Have!

Western Apicultural Society Prez Beth Conrey did a TEDxtalk last year. And it's wonderful!

Published on Nov 7, 2014

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Beth Conrey, President of the Western Apicultural Society (WAS) explains how ecosystem biodiversity and worldwide food production are connected, which are both anchored by a healthy bee population.

View at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=06qhKdX0nKo

What Would Happen If Honey Bees Disappeared (Video)

 Care2    By Ashlyn Kittrell  July 15, 2015

(Video "The Death of Bees Explained: Parasites, Poisons, and Humans from Kurzgesagt and The Nova Project)

Although we don’t entirely know why, bees are disappearing. While scientists have several theories as to why this might be happening, the overarching conclusion is that widespread impact will occur as the bee population dwindles. Some theories about the disappearance of bees include parasites called varroa mites that weaken the bee by sucking fluid from their bodies. It’s hard to kill these mites without also harming the bees, making this a particularly hard problem to navigate. Bees also need plenty of food and water to survive; but with human population growth their access to clean water and plants may be limited.

There are several things we can do to help bees stick around. Supporting local beekeepers by buying their honey products is one way to make sure that they have the resources to help their hives survive. Another helpful strategy is planting blooming plants. Not only does this provide bees with the pollen they need, but it’s also great motivation to have a beautiful garden. However, when planting anything it is important to avoid insecticide dusts as well as any neonicotonoid pesticides. Both of these can get carried back to the hive.

In 1988, there were five million hives. Today, there are 2.5 million. While we aren’t entirely sure why so many colonies are collapsing, we can be sure that the loss of bees would change the world.

To see what other effects the loss of bees would have as well as what may be causing the decline, watch the video from Kurzgesagt and The Nova Project.

Read more: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/what-would-happen-if-honey-bees-disappeared-video.html#ixzz3g5FeSNlp

The Bees Have It!

Bug Squad    By Cathy Keatley Garvey  May 29, 2015

If you missed the first-ever UC Davis Bee Symposium on keeping bees healthy, not to worry

The event, hosted May 9 in the Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science by the Honey and Pollination Centerand the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, drew some 360 people.

Entomology doctoral candidate Matthew Prebus of the Phil Ward lab, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, video-recorded the presentations and uploaded them today.

You can watch them on YouTube.

Amina Harris, director of the Honey and Pollination Center, and Michael Parrella, professor and chair of the UC Davis Department of Entomology, welcomed the crowd.

Marla Spivak, Distinguished McKnight Professor, University of Minnesota and a 2010 MacArthur Fellow, keynoted the symposium, speaking on "Helping Bees Stand on Their Own Six Feet."

The presentations on YouTube:

Marla Spivak: Protecting Pollinators

Amy Toth: Combined Effects of Viruses and Nutritional Stress on Honey Bee Health

Elina Niño: Best Management Practices to Support Honey Bee Health

Neal Williams: Enhancing Forage for Bees

Sarah Laird: The Bee Girl

Jake Reisdorf: Getting into Beekeeping- Thoughts from a 12-year-old Beekeeper

Katharina Ullman: Project Integrated Crop Pollination

John Miller: Keeping Bees Healthy with Forage

Benjamin Sallman: Bee Informed Partnership

Gretchen LeBuhn: The Giant Sunflower Project

Christine Casey: Introduction to the Häagen Dazs Honey Bee Haven

The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation generously provided funding.

Upcoming blog: Who won the student poster competition at the symposium and with what topics?

http://ucanr.edu/blogs/bugsquad/

The Pollinators: A Film by Sarah Rara

THE POLLINATORS: A Film by Sarah Rara

Made in LA at the Hammer Museum
June 15 - Sept 27

Excited to announce a new video installation "The Pollinators" on view as part of the Made in LA biennial at the Hammer Museum.

The Pollinators focuses on the insects, birds, animals, and vectors that pollinate flowers. Filmed against brightly colored backgrounds that both attract and distract pollinators, the video explores wild color spaces, modeling the ultraviolet-rich color range perceived by insects that extends beyond human vision and the RGB colorspace of video.

To hear KCRW's 8/23/2014 radio interview with artist Sarah Rara as she talks about her film, The Pollinators, go to:
 http://www.kcrw.com/news-culture/shows/good-food/the-best-restaurants-in-america-pizza-box-design-the-secret-world-of-bees (then scroll down to The Pollinator).

Sweet Connection Beekeeping and Computing

TedxHickory   Hive Tracks: James Wilkes  July 7, 2014

James Wilkes is husband to Shannon and father to Margaret, Galen, Sullivan, Israel, Lillian, Zion, Oliver, and Lillian.  He occupies his time in a variety of ways including employment as a professor and Chair of the Department of Computer Science at Appalachian State University, owner and worker on his family farm, Faith Mountain Farm, co-founder of Blowing Rock Software, LLC, and generally being curious about the world around him.

 Note: In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

Read and View at...  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bFkaq_7a5B0&feature=youtu.be

Let's Watch Bees!

Above USDA Headquarters: Bees are Abuzzing    May 16, 2014

The People's Garden Apiary located on the roof of the Jamie L. Whitten Building at USDA Headquarters in Washington, DC is home to approximately 40,000 Italian honey bees. You can #USDABeeWatch any day of the week by tuning into our live bee cam.

This time of year our hive is bursting with activity! The worker bees that you see are all female and are busy collecting nectar and pollen to convert into honey. Spring time in the Nation's Capital is a major time for honey production by honey bee colonies.

The activities of a colony vary with the seasons. Join the conversation about bees and other pollinators by using hashtag #USDABeeWatch.

About The People's Garden Apiary

The first beehive was installed on Earth Day in 2010 and a second hive was later added in 2011. USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Bee Research Lab in Beltsville, Maryland helps keep these colonies of bees strong and healthy so they can pollinate crops growing in the Headquarters People's Garden and neighboring landscapes. An added bonus is the delicious honey, approximately 18 gallons worth, extracted from the hive since 2010.

The beehives consist of wooden box-like sections stacked on top of each other. Each box (or super) holds 8-10 wooden frames, each containing a thin sheet of wax foundation. The bees build their combs on these foundations.

Honey is stored in the combs in the upper parts of the hive. When the bees have filled the combs in the upper section with honey and covered them with wax caps, the beekeeper takes them away to extract the honey. You can take a virtual tour of the People's Garden ApiaryThis is an external link or third-party site outside of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) website. for a look inside the hive and the fascinating world of beekeeping.

Honey Bees

Bee Hive.Honey bees are not native to the United States. The scientific name for honey bee is Apis mellifera. Since humans first began keeping honey bees, their principal aim has been the harvest of honey. Beekeepers select the appropriate type of honey bee based on temperament, physical characteristics, disease resistance, and productivity.

Italian honey bees were selected for the People's Garden Apiary because they are most often used in commercial beekeeping in the United States. These bees have a relatively gentle disposition and are good honey producers. They are not the most resistant to disease, but they excel in most other areas.

There have been some queen survivorship issues in both of the People's Garden colonies, which actually mirrors what's going on in the rest of the country. Queen health is an issue for everyone who buys queens, commercial or hobbyist. The exact underlying reasons for poor queen survivorship is unknown, but the ARS lab is actively researching this problem.

Why Care About Pollinators?

Pollinators need us and we need pollinators. Honey bees are responsible for pollinating more than 100 crops and one out of every three bites of food Americans eat. These foods give our diet diversity, flavor, and nutrition. Sadly, the number of native bees and domesticated bee populations are declining due to disease, adverse weather and other conditions.

The People's Garden Initiative encourages everyone to take an active role in saving the honey bee and other pollinators by adopting pollinator-friendly land management practices at home and within your local community. Remember: no bees, no honey.

How to Garden for Pollinators

A bee on a group of wildflowers.Increase the number of pollinators in your area by choosing plants that provide essential habitat and food sources for birds, bats, butterflies, moths, flies, beetles, wasps, small mammals, and most importantly, bees. Supporting pollinators is not hard to do. Start by following these simple steps to create a pollinator-friendly garden:

 

  • Go Native - plant native plant species
  • Bee Showy - flowers should bloom in your garden throughout the growing season
  • Bee Bountiful - plant big patches of each plant species
  • Bee Diverse - plant a diversity of flowering species that supply an abundance of pollen and nectar
  • Bee Chemical Free - limit or eliminate use of pesticides

Watch this webinar on Pollinators for Your GardenThis is an external link or third-party site outside of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) website. for expert advice on how to create a successful pollinator garden.

How can you find pollinator-friendly native plants for your garden?

The Pollinator Partnership offers 32 different planting guides to improve pollinator habitat, each one tailored to a specific ecoregion in the United States. Each guide is filled with an abundance of native plant and pollinator information. Enter your zip codeThis is an external link or third-party site outside of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) website. to find your ecoregion planting guide and download it for free.

Read more, Learn more, Watch live: http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usda/usdahome?navid=usdabees

Thanks to The Pollinator Partnership for sharing the link.

 

Wolves Change All Manner of Things, Even Rivers

CATCH THE BUZZ     By Kim Flottom     4/20/14

The Wolves ate the Elk that ate the plants that grew the flowers that fed the bees that made the berries that fed the bears that eat the Elk. But will the bears eat the bees? And what about those rivers?

Back in August last year THE BUZZ sent out this release from Oregon dealing with getting things in Yellowstone National Park back to where they were in the first place. It was the first, and I encourage you to read it first, but then, watch the link below to see what happens next. We, being at the top of the food chain can screw things up pretty good sometimes, but when we want, we can fix what we’ve damaged.

If we just leave nature alone, we will all improve our existence on this planet. Make sure you watch in full screen mode. And thanks John T. for sending this along.

http://www.trueactivist.com/gab_gallery/how-wolves-change-rivers/

Corvallis, Ore. – A new study suggests that the return of wolves to Yellowstone National Park is beginning to bring back a key part of the diet of grizzly bears that has been missing for much of the past century – berries that help bears put on fat before going into hibernation.

It's one of the first reports to identify the interactions between these large, important predators, based on complex ecological processes. It was published today by scientists from Oregon State University and Washington State University in the Journal of Animal Ecology.

The researchers found that the level of berries consumed by Yellowstone grizzlies is significantly higher now that shrubs are starting to recover following the re-introduction of wolves, which have reduced over-browsing by elk herds. The berry bushes also produce flowers of value to pollinators like butterflies, insects and hummingbirds; food for other small and large mammals; and special benefits to birds.

The report said that berries may be sufficiently important to grizzly bear diet and health that they could be considered in legal disputes – as is white pine nut availability now - about whether or not to change the "threatened" status of grizzly bears under the Endangered Species Act.

"Wild fruit is typically an important part of grizzly bear diet, especially in late summer when they are trying to gain weight as rapidly as possible before winter hibernation," said William Ripple, a professor in the OSU Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society, and lead author on the article. "Berries are one part of a diverse food source that aids bear survival and reproduction, and at certain times of the year can be more than half their diet in many places in North America."

When wolves were removed from Yellowstone early in the 1900s, increased browsing by elk herds caused the demise of young aspen and willow trees – a favorite food – along with many berry-producing shrubs and tall, herbaceous plants. The recovery of those trees and other food sources since the re-introduction of wolves in the 1990s has had a profound impact on the Yellowstone ecosystem, researchers say, even though it's still in the very early stages.

"Studies like this also point to the need for an ecologically effective number of wolves," said co-author Robert Beschta, an OSU professor emeritus. "As we learn more about the cascading effects they have on ecosystems, the issue may be more than having just enough individual wolves so they can survive as a species. In some situations, we may wish to consider the numbers necessary to help control overbrowsing, allow tree and shrub recovery, and restore ecosystem health."

As wolves help reduce elk numbers in Yellowstone and allow tree and shrub recovery, researchers said, this improves the diet and health of grizzly bears. In turn, a healthy grizzly bear population provides a second avenue of control on wild ungulates, especially on newborns in the spring time.

Yellowstone has a wide variety of nutritious berries – serviceberry, chokecherry, buffaloberry, twinberry, huckleberry and others – that are highly palatable to bears. These shrubs are also eaten by elk and thus likely declined as elk populations grew over time. With the return of wolves, the new study found the percentage of fruit in grizzly bear scat in recent years almost doubled during August.

Because the abundant elk have been an important food for Yellowstone grizzly bears for the past half-century, the increased supply of berries may help offset the reduced availability of elk in the bears' diet in recent years. More research is needed regarding the effects of wolves on plants and animals consumed by grizzly bears.

There is precedent for high levels of ungulate herbivory causing problems for grizzly bears, who are omnivores that eat both plants and animals. Before going extinct in the American Southwest by the early 1900s, grizzly bear diets shifted toward livestock depredation, the report noted, because of lack of plant-based food caused by livestock overgrazing. And, in the absence of wolves, black bears went extinct on Anticosti Island in Canada after over-browsing of berry shrubs by introduced while-tailed deer.

Increases in berry production in Yellowstone may also provide a buffer against other ecosystem shifts, the researchers noted – whitebark pine nut production, a favored bear food, may be facing pressure from climate change. Grizzly bear survival declined during years of low nut production.

Livestock grazing in grizzly bear habitat adjacent to the national park, and bison herbivory in the park, likely also contribute to high foraging pressure on shrubs and forbs, the report said. In addition to eliminating wolf-livestock conflicts, retiring livestock allotments in the grizzly bear recovery zone adjacent to Yellowstone could benefit bears through increases in plant foods.

As wolves help reduce elk numbers in Yellowstone and allow tree and shrub recovery, researchers said, this improves the diet and health of grizzly bears. In turn, a healthy grizzly bear population provides a second avenue of control on wild ungulates, especially on newborns in the spring time.

Yellowstone has a wide variety of nutritious berries – serviceberry, chokecherry, buffaloberry, twinberry, huckleberry and others – that are highly palatable to bears. These shrubs are also eaten by elk and thus likely declined as elk populations grew over time. With the return of wolves, the new study found the percentage of fruit in grizzly bear scat in recent years almost doubled during August.

Because the abundant elk have been an important food for Yellowstone grizzly bears for the past half-century, the increased supply of berries may help offset the reduced availability of elk in the bears' diet in recent years. More research is needed regarding the effects of wolves on plants and animals consumed by grizzly bears.

There is precedent for high levels of ungulate herbivory causing problems for grizzly bears, who are omnivores that eat both plants and animals. Before going extinct in the American Southwest by the early 1900s, grizzly bear diets shifted toward livestock depredation, the report noted, because of lack of plant-based food caused by livestock overgrazing. And, in the absence of wolves, black bears went extinct on Anticosti Island in Canada after over-browsing of berry shrubs by introduced while-tailed deer.

Increases in berry production in Yellowstone may also provide a buffer against other ecosystem shifts, the researchers noted – whitebark pine nut production, a favored bear food, may be facing pressure from climate change. Grizzly bear survival declined during years of low nut production.

Livestock grazing in grizzly bear habitat adjacent to the national park, and bison herbivory in the park, likely also contribute to high foraging pressure on shrubs and forbs, the report said. In addition to eliminating wolf-livestock conflicts, retiring livestock allotments in the grizzly bear recovery zone adjacent to Yellowstone could benefit bears through increases in plant foods. 

This message brought to you by Bee Culture, The Magazine Of American Beekeeping, published by the A.I. Root Company. Find us at -TwitterFacebookBee Culture’s Blog.

Also available at http://home.ezezine.com/1636/1636-2014.04.20.17.49.archive.html

No Bees, No Food: John Miller at TEDxUNC

Watch John Miller, Commercial beekeeper from North Dakota and Northern California, discuss his role in the pollination industry. His talk at TEDxUNC last month is entitled: No Bees, No Food. It’s worth your time.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MfRHrJunQ8M

Plus, listen to John Miller, Jim Doan, Michelle Colopy, Dave Hackenberg, Gordy Wardell, and Roger Starks on our 3 CD set of MILES TO GO Migratory Beekeeping Program (XMILESCD), held last October, or watch all of them, plus David and Davey Hackenberg, Gordy Wardell, and Brian Kulling from A&O Forklift, on our 2 DVD set, unload, wash, load and net a truck full of pallets full of hives in a live demonstration, in our MILES TO GO DVD (XMILESDVD). Either for only $29.95, post paid in the US. Call 800.289.7668 ext 3220 to order, or send check to MILES, 623 West Liberty St., Medina, OH 44256

This ezine is also available online at http://home.ezezine.com/1636/1636-2014.03.24.11.10.archive.html

(This message brought to us by CATCH THE BUZZ: Kim Flottom,  Bee Culture, The Magazine Of American Beekeeping, published by the A.I. Root Company. Twitter.FacebookBee Culture’s Blog.)

Dance of the Honey Bee

Moyers & Company billmoyers.com    10/4/13

October 4, 2013

Bill presents and introduces the short documentary Dance of the Honey Bee. Narrated by Bill McKibben, the film takes a look at the determined, beautiful and vital role honey bees play in preserving life, as well as the threats bees face from a rapidly changing landscape. “Not only are we dependent on the honey bee for much of what we eat,” says Bill, “there is, of course, a grace and elegance they bring to the natural world that would diminish us all were they to disappear.”

Producer, Director, Photographer & Editor: Peter Nelson.
Narrator: Bill McKibben. Original music: John Powell. Audio: Merce Williams.

Intro Producer: Lena Shemel. Intro Editor: Paul Desjarlais.

http://billmoyers.com/segment/%E2%80%9Cdance-of-the-honey-bee%E2%80%9D-2/

Related link: Protect Honey Bees in Your Own Backyard: http://billmoyers.com/content/protect-honey-bees-in-your-own-backyard/