Scientists Use Honey and Wild Salmon to Trace Industrial Metals in the Enviroment

ScienceMag August 21, 2019

Credit: Dominique Weis

Credit: Dominique Weis

Scientists have combined analyses from honey and salmon to show how lead from natural and industrial sources gets distributed throughout the environment. By analysing the relative presence of differing lead isotopes in honey and Pacific salmon, Vancouver-based scientists have been able to trace the sources of lead (and other metals) throughout the region. Scientists in France, Belgium and Italy are now looking to apply the same approach to measure pollutants in honey in major European cities. The research* is being presented at the Goldschmidt conference in Barcelona.

Scientists have long known that honey bees pick up small amounts of metal elements (i.e., iron, zinc, and pollutants such as lead, and cadmium) when they alight on flowers and leaves. They carry these metals back to the hive where tiny amounts are incorporated into the honey. However, this is the first time researchers have been able to establish clearly the sources of the metals carried by the bees and their products, making them reliable biomarkers for environmental pollution.

“We’ve found that we can let the bees do the hard the work for us: they go to thousands of sites where metal-containing dust particulates might land, then bring samples back to a central hive. From there we can take the honey to have it analysed and begin to identify the source of pollutants like lead” said Ph.D. candidate Kate Smith, part of a team working at the Pacific Centre for Isotopic and Geochemical Research (University of British Columbia).

Once they have sampled the honey gathered by the bees, it is taken to a specialised geochemistry lab to be analysed using a high-resolution ICP-MS (Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) instrument. This allows scientists to distinguish between different types (isotopes) of certain metal pollutants, like lead.

Smith continued, “Looking at the lead isotopic composition of the honey samples, we can tell the difference between honey gathered in the city centre of Vancouver and honey gathered in rural areas. We see that the trace amounts of lead in urban honey samples contain higher 208Pb/206Pb ratios that have no local natural equivalent, indicating that they come from man-made sources like aging city infrastructure and fuel combustion (e.g. cars and ships). Lead ratios measured in rural honey, on the other hand, reflect those of natural sources, like the local geology or particulates from nearby forest fires.”

Presenting the work on salmon, postdoctoral researcher Dr. Miling Li added “This work with honeybees is mirrored in initial findings from shellfish and salmon. Juvenile salmon breed and live in remote freshwater ecosystems in British Columbia, and their lead composition reflects that found in nature, e.g. the nearby Garibaldi volcano range. Adult salmon that forage in the open ocean off the BC coast reveal isotopic compositions consistent with downtown Vancouver honeys. This indicates that Pacific salmons were exposed to lead during their sea life mostly from anthropogenic sources in the Northeast Pacific Ocean.”

Although we can identify the sources of lead, the lead concentrations in both the honey and salmon from Vancouver and the surrounding areas are extremely low and well below the reported world-wide average of lead in honey.

Following the proof of concept work in Metro Vancouver (and similar work in Australia, in Sydney and the site of the vast Broken Hill lead mines, the main source of lead added to gasoline in Europe, Asia and many other places in the world), the UBC team has now developed standardised protocols for measurement of lead isotopes in honey to apply the technique to other cities. Experiments are now being set up in Paris, Brussels, and Piacenza, with interest also coming from the U.S. Simultaneously, the UBC team is confirming the efficacy of the Vancouver honey data by monitoring topsoil and air quality near the hives.

Kate Smith said, “Honey is particularly useful because honeybees can be found pretty well everywhere, so we believe that using honey as a proxy measurement for lead pollution may become an important urban geochemistry and environmental tool. This means we need to make sure that we have a framework that gives results of consistent quality from year to year and city to city. This is what we are now testing.”

Research team leader Professor Dominique Weis said “Urban geochemistry has become an important discipline in understanding the spread of heavy metal pollutants in cities, as long as the natural background is well characterized. Lead isotopic analysis is a standard geochemical method that for decades provided a signal dominated by lead that was used as an additive in gasoline. Honey is an effective biomonitor, and allows us to identify the source of some pollutants even at very low levels; we think that this method could become an internationally accepted way of assessing metal sources and distribution in urban environments”.

Airborne lead pollution varies significantly from area to area. It is found naturally at low levels. Major sources of pollution are metal processing, incinerators, and other industrial processes. Lead in gasoline was banned in the 1990s in North America, which caused a significant decrease in airborne lead levels (98% in the USA). Depending on the level of exposure, lead can have significant health effects**.

Commenting, Professor Mark P Taylor***, Macquarie University, Australia, leader of the Australian group working on honey said,

“This research is emblematic of contemporary science because it touches on two emerging key public interests in an increasingly urbanised world: it examines environmental quality by way of assessing anthropogenic changes to trace element sources in the wider environment and it engages citizens directly through the collection and sharing of honey for geochemical analysis. Nothing could be sweeter for science.”

This is an independent comment; Professor Taylor was not involved in this work.

https://scienmag.com/scientists-use-honey-and-wild-salmon-to-trace-industrial-metals-in-the-environment/?fbclid=IwAR0zbMwynvYS6sGZdYdGS8ZQtkleI8Jw19Ub64BrYyprWC063kdDM_DcUYo

"Pollinators Under Pressure" Screens at McGinty's Gallery on Friday, September 6, 2019

McGinty’s Gallery
At The End Of The World
Presents Their First Annual Themed Show,
”Casa de la Mariposa”

casa de la mariposa.jpg

McGinty’s Gallery
At The End Of The World
869 E. Mariposa St.
Altadena, CA 91001
https://www.facebook.com/events/880742618971093/
Show runs September 6 - October 11, 2019

Opening Reception September 6th 6-10pm

Centering on butterflies and metamorphosis, the show features over 60 local artists.
Enjoy tacos by Sofia and live music by Artichoke.

With a Special Screening
of
Pollinators Under Pressure”
with executive producers Laura Cox and George DiCaprio

pollinators under pressure.jpg

Pollinators Under Pressure” is a short film (approx. 14 min.)

Narrated by Leonardo DiCaprio

Featuring: Dominic Monaghan, Michael A. Hill, Dr. Kimberly Winter, Sam Droege, Gunther Hauk, Laurie Davis Adams, Scott Hoffman Black, Josefina Navarro, Elvis Cordova, Emerson Hernandez, Juan Elizondo, Kala Price

(The screening is much less formal than a ticketed event. It will be in the alley behind the gallery around 8:30pm.
The main focus of the event - the visual art inside the gallery.)

For more info: https://www.facebook.com/events/880742618971093/

Come Meet the 2019 American Honey Princess at the LA County Fair Bee Booth!

LOS ANGELES COUNTY FAIR
August 30 - September 22, 2019

LA County Fair 2019 logo 320.jpg

Pomona Fairgrounds
1101 West McKinley Avenue
Pomona, CA 91768
(The Bee Booth is located across from the “Big Red Barn”)
https://www.lacountyfair.com/

Fair Runs August 30 - September 22, 2019
(Closed Mondays & Tuesdays)
Fair Times & Schedule for the General Public

Come Meet the 2019 American Honey Princess

2019 American Honey Princess Nicole Medina lacba .JPG

Nicole Medina
The American Beekeeping Federation
2019 American Honey Princess

Nicole Medina, the 2019 American Honey Princess, will visit Los Angeles, California, September 3-8, as part of her National Honey Month Tour.  She will be a guest of the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association at the Los Angeles County Fair, speaking to fair goers about the importance of honeybees to California agriculture and how honeybees drive the quantity and quality of our food.  She will also share information about the bonuses that honeybees provide beyond honey.  Nicole’s trip is sponsored by the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association.

Nicole is the daughter of Joel and Nolvia Medina of Green Township, New Jersey.  She is a sophomore at Sussex County Community College studying business administration.  Nicole has been keeping bees for five years with her family and is an active volunteer in the Sussex County Beekeepers Association. 

As the 2019 American Honey Princess, Nicole serves as a national spokesperson on behalf of the American Beekeeping Federation, a trade organization representing beekeepers and honey producers throughout the United States.  The American Honey Queen and Princess speak and promote in venues nationwide, and, as such Princess Nicole will travel throughout the United States in 2019.  Prior to being selected as the American Honey Princess, Nicole served as the 2018 New Jersey Honey Queen.  In this role, she promoted the honey industry at fairs, festivals, and farmers’ markets, via media interviews, and in schools. 

The beekeeping industry touches the lives of every individual in our country.  In fact, honeybees are responsible for nearly one-third of our entire diet, in regards to the pollination services that they provide for a large majority of fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes. This amounts to nearly $19 billion per year of direct value from honeybee pollination to United States agriculture.

The Bee Booth

Bee Booth at the LA County Fair.jpg

From August 30 through September 22, 2019, volunteer members of the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association and the Beekeepers Association of Southern California will be on hand at the Los Angeles County Fair Bee Booth educating thousands of school children and the general public about honeybees and the importance they play in our lives. The LA County Fair is one of the largest county fairs in the country and is the most-visited event in the Los Angeles region in September. It's an end-of-summer tradition for many.

The Observation Hive

LA County Fair Bee Booth Observation Hive.jpg

Gather round our fabulous HONEY BEE OBSERVATION HIVE.

See if you can FIND THE QUEEN!

Let us spark your interest in honey bees, their amazing lifestyle and social structure, how they help feed the world, how they have survived for millions of years.

HONEY! HONEY! HONEY!

LA County Fair Bee Booth Local Honey.jpg

Delicious pure, natural, 100% raw local honey direct from Los Angeles County beekeepers is available for purchase.

Pick up HONEY STIX in YUMMY flavors and vibrant colors.

Proceeds from honey sales go to Honey Bee Research.

Come catch the BUZZ ABOUT BEES at the Bee Booth!

Bees: How Important Are They and What Would Happen If They Were Extinct?

The Conversation - I Need to Know August 19, 2019

How important are bees and what will happen when they go extinct? Is there research into what is killing them? I’ve been told it’s weed killers… – Tink, aged 18, Cornwall, UK.

Bees – including honey bees, bumble bees and solitary bees – are very important because they pollinate food crops. Pollination is where insects move pollen from one plant to another, fertilising the plants so that they can produce fruit, vegetables, seeds and so on. If all the bees went extinct, it would destroy the delicate balance of the Earth’s ecosystem and affect global food supplies.

There are more than 800 wild bee species within Europe, seven of which are classified by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) as critically endangered. A further 46 are endangered, 24 are vulnerable and 101 are near threatened. While it’s unlikely that all bee species will be wiped out anytime soon, losing these threatened species would still have a big impact on pollination around the world, wiping out plant species, some of which we rely on for our food.


I Need To Know is a series by The Conversation, which gives teenagers the chance to have their questions about the world answered by experts. Send your questions – along with your first name, age and the area where you live – to ineedtoknow@theconversation.com, or find out more ways to get in touch at the end of this article.


But the problem goes far beyond bees. In fact, honeybees are responsible for only one third of crop pollination and a very small proportion of the wild plant pollination. There are a diverse range of other insects including butterflies, bumblebees and small flies that do the rest of the work – and it looks like these insects are in trouble too.

A bumblebee, pulling it’s weight. Emily L Brown, Author provided

A bumblebee, pulling it’s weight. Emily L Brown, Author provided

A recent study suggests that as many as 40% of the world’s insect species are in decline. Insects are facing extinction rates that are eight times higher than vertebrates. In Germany, scientists have recorded losses of up to 75% of the total mass of insects in protected areas.

These trends lead scientists to believe that about a third of all insect species – that’s nearly 2m – may be threatened with extinction. And that figure is growing by over 100,000 species every year. Yet hard data on threatened insect species is lacking, with only 8,000 records actually assessed by the IUCN.

Here’s a rundown of what scientists believe to be the top causes of declines in insect diversity and abundance.

Invasive species

Invasive predators, parasites and disease-causing bacteria called “pathogens” have been blamed for the collapse of honeybee colonies around the world.

Recently, the spread of the Asian Hornet in Europe has caused great concern. This species preys on honey bees, and a single hornet is capable of killing an entire hive.

There is some evidence that wild bees in North America have declined in the face of fungal and bacterial diseases.



Of course, in the past bees have coexisted with these pathogens. The fact that scientists have seen more bees lost to these diseases in recent times is probably linked with the bees’ increased exposure to pesticides, which can damage their immune systems.

Pesticides

Pollution – particularly from exposure to pesticides – is a key cause of pollinator decline. There are three types of chemical pesticide widely used in the UK: insecticides targeting insect pests, fungicides targeting fungal pathogens of crops and herbicides targeting weeds.

Insecticides contain chemicals that can kill pollinators, so they’re clearly a threat. But they may not be the greatest problem pollinators experience. Herbicides are actually used five times as much in farming as insecticides. These weed killers target a huge variety of the wild plants that bees need to forage.

Environmentally-friendly farming schemes recommend planting wildflower strips on the edge of crops, to provide safe refuge and food sources for pollinators. Yet drifting clouds of herbicide from growing fields can contaminate these wildflower strips.

Wildflowers border farmland in Sussex, UK.  Shutterstock.

Wildflowers border farmland in Sussex, UK. Shutterstock.

The most cutting-edge research suggests glyphosate (the most commonly used weed killer) can impact the gut microbes of bees, which can have devastating implications for their health.

Although exposure to herbicides and pesticides used by farmers is likely to be one of the main causes of pollinator decline, the chemicals used by city authorities and civilian gardeners might also be harming bees and other insects. So, for the bees’ sake, it’s best to avoid using them where possible.

Climate change

Global warming is believed to be a major driver of wild bee declines. Some wild bees can only survive in a narrow range of temperatures. As their habitats get warmer, the places where they can live grow smaller. For example, some might be forced to live at higher altitudes, where it’s cooler, reducing the space they have to live in.

Habitat destruction

The way land is farmed has been associated with declines in biodiversity and pollination. Farming destroys the kinds of spaces that bees use to nest, it takes away the diversity of food that bees use to forage on and it even has wider impacts on other animals like wild birds, mammals and amphibians.

While countless insect species are currently going extinct, those that remain are taking their place, so it’s unlikely that crops will stop being pollinated any time soon. Generalist species such as the buff-tailed bumblebee, the European honey bee and common small black flies, which can survive in a huge range of temperatures and conditions, will become the main species pollinating our food sources, while rarer, more specialist species will decline.

But as generalist species move in to take the place space left by the losses of specialists, and complex ecosystems become dominated by a couple of generalists, the whole system becomes far more susceptible to a single sudden change. Insects form the base of many intricate food webs, their decline will result in a complex cascade of impacts on vertebrates, threatening ecological stability.

https://theconversation.com/bees-how-important-are-they-and-what-would-happen-if-they-went-extinct-121272

The Conversation:

The Conversation.jpg

If you’re a teenager aged 12 to 18, and you’ve got questions you’d like an expert to answer, send them our way! Include your first name, age and the area you live in. To get in touch, you can:

We have a huge pool of experts at our fingertips, and we can’t wait to share their knowledge with you.

The Laborious Honey Bee

BugSquad By Kathy Keatley Garvey September 9, 2019

Today is Labor Day 2019, a federal holiday celebrated the first Monday of September.

However, "the girls" are working, as they do every day of the year, weather permitting.

"The girls" are the worker honey bees.

Unless you keep bees or have access to a hive, you mostly see them foraging. But inside the hive, they are also nurse maids, nannies, royal attendants, builders, architects, dancers, honey tenders, pollen packers, propolis or "glue" specialists, air conditioning and heating technicians, guards, and undertakers.

They ensure the survival of the hive, but their life span is short.

"Worker bees live for approximately five to six weeks in the spring and summer," writes author and retired bee scientist and bee wrangler Norman Gary, emeritus professor of entomology at the University of California, Davis, in his book, Honey Bee Hobbyist: The Care and Keeping of Bees."Those reared in the fall live for several months--long enough for the colony to survive the winter--and are replaced by young bees in late winter or early spring."

In peak season, a honey bee queen can lay 1500 to 2000 eggs a day, and most of them will be worker bees, the most needed of the three castes (queen, drone and worker) in the hive.  Although the smallest, but they do most of the work.  The queen is the egg layer. The drone's role is strictly reproduction.

Worker bees forage within four to five miles of their hive. If you provide no nectar or pollen sources in your yard, they'll go elsewhere.

Theirs is a dangerous occupation. No thanks to predators (such as birds, praying mantids and spiders) and pesticides, many do not return home at night.

Like to photograph them? Try the "magic hour," which occurs about an hour before the sun sets. We love photographing them on Mexican sunflowers (Tithonia). The light is soft, warm and welcoming.

(Editor's Note: Interested in becoming a beekeeper or learning more about beekeeping? Be sure to check out the UC Davis-based California Master Beekeeper Program, directed by Extension apiculturist Elina Lastro Niño of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. The next course is on managing varroa mites, a major pest.)

Worker honey bee forages on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in the magic hour, the hour before sunset. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Worker honey bee forages on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in the magic hour, the hour before sunset. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Illuminated by the late afternoon sun, the worker bee prepares to fly to another Tithonia blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Illuminated by the late afternoon sun, the worker bee prepares to fly to another Tithonia blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A worker bee takes flight, lifting over a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A worker bee takes flight, lifting over a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

OPENING WEEKEND - Los Angeles County Fair - Buzz By the Bee Booth!

LA County Fair 2019 logo 320.jpg

LOS ANGELES COUNTY FAIR
BEE BOOTH
August 30 - September 22, 2019

Pomona Fairgrounds
1101 West McKinley Avenue
Pomona, CA 91768
(The Bee Booth is located across from the “Big Red Barn”)
https://www.lacountyfair.com/

Fair Opens Labor Day Weekend (Fri-Mon)
Fair Runs August 30 - September 22, 2019
(Closed Mondays & Tuesdays except Labor Day, Sept. 2)
Fair Schedule for the General Public


VISIT THE BEE BOOTH!

Bee Booth at the LA County Fair.jpg

From August 30 through September 22, 2019, volunteer members of the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association and the Beekeepers Association of Southern California will be on hand at the Los Angeles County Fair Bee Booth educating thousands of school children and the general public about honeybees and the importance they play in our lives. The LA County Fair is one of the largest county fairs in the country and is the most-visited event in the Los Angeles region in September. It's an end-of-summer tradition for many. 

OBSERVATION HIVE!

LA County Fair Bee Booth Observation Hive.jpg

Gather round our fabulous HONEY BEE OBSERVATION HIVE. See if you can FIND THE QUEEN!
Let us spark your interest in honey bees, their amazing lifestyle and social structure, how they help feed the world, and how they have survived for millions of years.

HONEY! HONEY! HONEY!

LA County Fair Bee Booth Local Honey.jpg

Delicious pure, natural, 100% raw local honey direct from Los Angeles County beekeepers is available for purchase. Pick up HONEY STIX in YUMMY flavors and vibrant colors.
Proceeds from honey sales go to Honey Bee Research. 

MEET THE 2019 AMERICAN HONEY PRINCESS!

2019 AMERICAN HONEY PRINCESS, NICOLE MEDINA.

2019 AMERICAN HONEY PRINCESS, NICOLE MEDINA.

Nicole Medina
The American Beekeeping Federation
2019 American Honey Princess

Nicole Medina, the 2019 American Honey Princess, will visit Los Angeles, California, September 3-8, as part of her National Honey Month Tour.  She will be a guest of the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association at the Los Angeles County Fair, speaking to fair goers about the importance of honeybees to California agriculture and how honeybees drive the quantity and quality of our food.  She will also share information about the bonuses that honeybees provide beyond honey.  Nicole’s trip is sponsored by the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association.

Nicole is the daughter of Joel and Nolvia Medina of Green Township, New Jersey.  She is a sophomore at Sussex County Community College studying business administration.  Nicole has been keeping bees for five years with her family and is an active volunteer in the Sussex County Beekeepers Association. 

As the 2019 American Honey Princess, Nicole serves as a national spokesperson on behalf of the American Beekeeping Federation, a trade organization representing beekeepers and honey producers throughout the United States.  The American Honey Queen and Princess speak and promote in venues nationwide, and, as such, Princess Nicole will travel throughout the United States in 2019.  Prior to being selected as the American Honey Princess, Nicole served as the 2018 New Jersey Honey Queen.  In this role, she promoted the honey industry at fairs, festivals, and farmers’ markets, via media interviews, and in schools. 

The beekeeping industry touches the lives of every individual in our country.  In fact, honeybees are responsible for nearly one-third of our entire diet, in regards to the pollination services that they provide for a large majority of fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes. This amounts to nearly $19 billion per year of direct value from honeybee pollination to United States agriculture.

VOLUNTEER MEMBERS OF THE LACBA AND BASC

The following information, schedule, and times is for the LACBA and BASC Bee Booth Volunteers. Schedule and times for the General Public can be found here: https://lacountyfair.com/.

2018 Bee Booth Observation Hive.jpg

Hello Fellow Beekeepers:

The Los Angeles County Fair is upon us. All
E-vites were sent out Aug 5. Your email will come through Sign-up.com (Copy Los Angeles fair). If you did not receive your E-vite, check your spam, if not, call me (323) 243-0756 and I will be happy to either resend or help you schedule a day and shift time.

Some points to be aware of:

The day that you’re scheduled for, please plan to come early as I understand that security is going to be tight. Please bring your patience.

Your entry pass and parking pass will be at Gate 1 on McKinley at the "Will Call" window. Parking is only for 15 minutes, you'll then need to move your vehicle to the parking gates noted on your parking pass. Give them your name and tell them that you’re gong to the Bee Exhibit. Both these passes are good for the entire day.

The Bee Booth is located in the Heritage area. The last little red building before the farm area.

If you wish to purchase an LACBA green shirt they will be available at the venue. The cost is $15.00. If you already own one, please wear it. This helps our guests know who to go to with questions.

If you want to schedule a same day or next day time and shift, please call me so I may make arrangements to have your passes at the "Will Call" window.

Come help educate your community about bees! Mingle with fellow beekeepers! You'll learn more than you could ever imagine about bees by being a part of the LA County Fair Bee Booth. This is a great opportunity to share what you've learned in Beekeeping Class 101. We guarantee you won't be bored - and we could use your help at the Honey Table and with the Observation Hive.

Your presence helps to make the fair successful. Please remember that much of the funds that we raise goes to bee research. So, please come out and volunteer to help make this another successful year with your other fellow beekeepers.

If you have any questions please feel free to call or email me (323) 243-0756 or cynthia.alvarado56@yahoo.com.

Bee Booth Set Up - Saturday (August 24th) 9AM-2PM: Come help set up the Bee Booth. Enter through Gate 1. Drive to the Bee Booth across from the Big Red Barn. On Bee Booth SET UP DAY ONLY you can park near the Bee Booth. Lunch will be provided. There's plenty to do and we have lots of fun!!!

Bee Booth Volunteer Fair Days: The fair runs from August 30 - September 22 (Wed thru Sun) except for Labor Day Weekend (Fri thru Mon). We have 3 shifts per day (no less than 4 volunteers per shift). Shifts available: All Labor Day Weekend and all Saturdays and Sundays: 9:30-1:00, 12:30-5:00, 4:30-10:00. On Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays: 9:00-1:00, 12:30-5:00, 4:30-10:00.

Bee Booth Take Down - Sunday, (September 22rd): We start taking down the Bee Booth in the evening. The more help we have, the quicker we're done. We need to be finished and off the fairgrounds by 10PM.

Parking for Bee Booth Volunteers:
Lot 9
(across the street from the fair): Walk across the street, enter through the gate, go under the tunnel, turn right. We're across from the Big Red Barn.

Lot 17 Go across the race track to the far side of the Big Red Barn.

Tickets for Bee Booth Volunteers: Tickets will be at WILL CALL at the McKinley Entrance (Gate 1). They will be under Bee Booth Exhibit under your name. Please allow approx. 15 min. to get your tickets.

We had a great time at last year's fair. See our 2018 Bee Booth Photo Album on Facebook.

JUST SOME OF THE MANY VOLUNTEERS FROM THE LOS ANGELES COUNTY BEEKEEPERS ASSOCIATION AND THE BEEKEEPERS ASSOCIATION OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA! THANK YOU ALL FOR YOUR MANY HOURS HELPING THE HONEY BEES!

JUST SOME OF THE MANY VOLUNTEERS FROM THE LOS ANGELES COUNTY BEEKEEPERS ASSOCIATION AND THE BEEKEEPERS ASSOCIATION OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA! THANK YOU ALL FOR YOUR MANY HOURS HELPING THE HONEY BEES!

The Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. 100% of the funds raised through donations and all profit from honey sales go to honey bee education and research. Thank you!

LA County Fair Bee Booth Set Up

Thank you!

Thank you to all the member volunteers from the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association and the Beekeepers Association of Southern California for heading out to the Pomona Fairgrounds today to help set up the Bee Booth at the LA County Fair!

Beekeeper Bob is ready to greet you at the Bee Booth!

Beekeeper Bob is ready to greet you at the Bee Booth!

Bees and Honey at the Bee Booth!

Bees and Honey at the Bee Booth!

A fresh new coat of paint!

A fresh new coat of paint!

Lunch time at Bee Booth Set Up!

Lunch time at Bee Booth Set Up!

LACBA and BASC Member Volunteers

Thank you to the LACBA and BASC volunteer members who have already signed up to work the Bee Booth. This is a great opportunity to be of service to the honey bees, the LA County Fair, the General Public, and your Beekeeping Associations. If you have not already signed up - we can use your help! If you have not received your Evite, please contact our Bee Booth Coordinator Extraordinaire, Cindy Alvarado at (323- 243-0756 or cynthia.alvarado56@yahoo.com.

An Average Day at the Bee Booth!

Learn about bees, find the queen, pick up some raw local honey from Los Angeles County beekeepers.

Learn about bees, find the queen, pick up some raw local honey from Los Angeles County beekeepers.

Microbes on the Menu for Bee Larvae

PHYS.ORG (ARS News Service) By Jan Suszkiw (US Department of Agriculture) August 20, 2019

Newly hatched blue mason bee larvae feeding on pollen provisions within a hollow reed.  Photo Credit: Shawn Steffan

Newly hatched blue mason bee larvae feeding on pollen provisions within a hollow reed. Photo Credit: Shawn Steffan

MADISON, WISCONSIN, August 20, 2019—Bees only feast on nectar and pollen, right?

Wrong. Turns out, Nature's famously busy insect isn't strictly vegan, after all.

Reporting online in this month's American Naturalist, a team of Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and university scientists has shown that bee larvae (brood) have a taste for "microbial meat."

ARS entomologist Shawn Steffan and his colleagues at the University of Wisconsin, Cornell University, and Hokkaido University in Japan coined the term to describe an important ingredient in the brood's pollen provisions—namely, the protein of beneficial bacteria and fungi.

The microbes are naturally occurring in the pollen and feed and multiply within it. In the process, they increase the pollen's nutritional value to brood by enrichening it with amino acids—the building blocks of protein—that flowering plants alone may not always provide.

"Bees actually require the non-plant proteins of these pollen-borne symbionts to complete their growth and development—which makes them omnivores," explained Steffan, with the ARS Vegetable Crops Research Unit in Madison, Wisconsin.

In fact, the team observed an appetite for microbial meat among brood that spanned 14 species distributed across all major families of social and solitary bees—Melittidae, Apidae and Megachilidae among them.

The microbes don't just serve themselves up as critical sources of amino acids, though. They also secrete enzymes that help break down and age raw pollen into a more nutritious and digestible form known as "beebread." Nurse bees may recognize this benefit and encourage the microbes' growth in pollen fed to brood, note the researchers in their paper. This microbial mix-mash may also check the growth of harmful bacteria or fungi that can ruin beebread or sicken the hive.

For their study, the researchers used isotope- and gas chromatography-based methods to calculate the ratio of nitrogen in two types of amino acids (glutamic acid and phenylalanine) in the tissues of adult bees and in beebread. The team chose the method because of its accuracy in determining an organism's trophic position—where it stands on the proverbial food web of life based on the flow of nutrients and energy from producers to consumers of these resources.

In this case, the team's isotope analysis showed that bee brood's consumption of both plant and microbial proteins warranted raising the insect's trophic status from that of a strict herbivore to an omnivore.

More broadly, Steffan said, the findings underscore the need to examine what effects fungicide use on flowering crops can have on the microbial make up of pollen fed to brood and, in turn, their development.

The Agricultural Research Service is the U.S. Department of Agriculture's chief scientific in-house research agency. Daily, ARS focuses on solutions to agricultural problems affecting America. Each dollar invested in agricultural research results in $20 of economic impact.

https://phys.org/news/2019-08-microbes-menu-bee-larvae.html

How Bees Defend Themselves from Predators

AgNet West By Cathy Isom August 19, 2019

In this part of her series on raising bees, Cathy Isom lets you know about how bees defend themselves. That’s coming up on This Land of Ours.

In this part of her series on raising bees, Cathy Isom lets you know about how bees defend themselves. That’s coming up on This Land of Ours.

Honeybees tend to take excellent care of themselves, however, unlike most animals we care for, we have very little control over what happens when a busy bee leaves its hive in pursuit of pollen.

A honeybee’s primary defense mechanism is its ability to sting a predator, injecting a debilitating, sometimes deadly, venom. Amazingly, only female honeybees can deliver a sting to its enemies, and despite what most people believe, the bee does not die after stinging its attacker, unless it has stung a mammal with fleshy skin– such as a human.

A Japanese honeybee feeds from a garden cosmos flower

A Japanese honeybee feeds from a garden cosmos flower

The Japanese honeybee has come up with an ingenious way to kill larger insects that pose a threat to their hives, like the wasp. If an intruder is nearby, the honeybees will plot to ambush the unwanted visitor. Literally, they get together, hide, and then attack the intruder.

The bees attack the predator by forming a “bee ball” around it and begin flapping their wings to create an intolerable, deadly, environment for the predator. Heat and carbon monoxide from the rapid wing-flapping suffocate and kill the intruder. There is hope that this trait can be bred into other types of bees, but at this time, there has been little success.

Bees actually create their own entrance reducer with propolis— a strong mixture of wax, saliva, and sap. Honeybees have rarely been known to take this action on their own. Most of the reports of a bee-made reducer come after a manmade reducer has been removed.

I’m Cathy Isom…

http://agnetwest.com/how-bees-defend-themselves-predators/

Celebrate National Honey Bee Day at The Valley Hive Honey Competition & Recipe Contest

Celebrate National Honeybee Day
The Valley Hive's 4th Annual
HONEY COMPETITION AND RECIPE CONTEST
Sunday, August 18th from 4pm to 7pm
10538 Topanga Cyn Blvd in Chatsworth!

It's the perfect venue for celebrating NATIONAL HONEYBEE DAY.

Come on out to taste backyard honey and delectable recipes made with honey.  Meet local vendors.  Drink honey cocktails.  Learn how to make mead and how to cook with honey.  There will be kids activities. As well as a belly dance performance.

Got honey? Join dozens of other local beekeepers and show off your prize honey by entering our Honey Competition.  Submit 2 - 8oz jars of honey (1 labeled & 1 unlabeled) by Friday August 16th.

Not a beekeeper? Enter a favorite recipe that uses honey. From sweet to savory, give us your best dish!  Entries must be received by 3pm on Sunday August 18th.  Bring 3 servings for the Judges and more for the crowd to try at the event.

This event has always been held as a Fundraiser for honeybees, and this year is no different. 
This year, all donations received from this event will go to Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association.

honey competition winners 2018.jpg

August Apiary Inspector Notes

August 13, 2019

Jaime Garza, County of San Diego | Department of Agriculture, Weights and Measures Apiary/Agricultural Standards Inspector

Dear Beekeeper, 

I hope your bee colonies were able to produce some surplus honey this year. I spoke to many beekeepers whose colonies produced a good amount of honey this year. 

As the season progresses into late summer/early fall you should consider the following for maintaining healthy bee colonies: 

  • Monitoring/managing Varroa mites: many beekeepers are beginning to monitor for Varroa mites at this time of year. Two sampling methods are the sugar shake or alcohol wash method. You do not want to have more than 3 mites per 100 bees sampled. You can see the Honey Bee Health videos on Varroa sampling methods - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IgPfT9FQxLc. There is also a helpful Tool Guide on Varroa Management that you can reference for Varroa mite management techniques - https://honeybeehealthcoalition.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/HBHC-Guide_Varroa_Interactive_7thEdition_June2018.pdf.

  • Monitoring for American foulbrood – if a colony appears weak or has died you will want to check for the highly contagious bacterial disease called American foulbrood – see link for more information https://honeybeehealthcoalition.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/HBHC__AFB-EFB-Final-061119.pdf.

  • Provide water with landing sites for your bees – a bee colony is like other livestock or pet and needs water to drink and to cool off the hive. On very hot days one established bee colony can go through 1 gallon of water per day.

  • Provide adequate ventilation during hot days so bees can cool off.

  • Ant control – weed control, ant bait stations and moats surrounding hive stand legs are some ways beekeepers keep ants from invading their bee colonies.

  • Over-defensive honey bee colonies – honey bees displaying over-defensive characteristics should be requeened or euthanized. The longer an over-defensive colony remains in the environment allows the queen to spread their unwanted “mean” genetics through the drones that are produced in the colony which will go on to mate with other honey bee virgin queens in the environment which dilutes the gentle tempered honey bees. 

As always, feel free to contact me with questions, comments, concerns or if you would like to request a Hive health and Beekeeping Best Management Practices review at your apiary. 

Thank you,
Jaime Garza | County of San Diego | Department of Agriculture, Weights and Measures | Apiary/Agricultural Standards Inspector | Phone: 858-614-7738 | Email: jaime.garza@sdcounty.ca.gov | Website: www.sdcountybees.org

Cottage Food Operation Information

August 13, 2019
Jaime Garza, County of San Diego | Department of Agriculture, Weights and Measures Apiary/Agricultural Standards Inspector

Dear Beekeeper, 

Please find some helpful links that explain the following information on Cottage Food Operations which allows individuals to prepare and/or package certain non-potentially hazardous foods in private-home kitchens referred to as "cottage food operations" (CFOs): 

 *Honey label has specific requirements in the California Food & Ag Code as well. 

All honey containers must have the following labeling:  

  1. Identity: common product name “Honey” you can also choose to include floral or blossom source of honey in addition to product name Honey

  2. Responsibility: name and address of producer or distributor

  3. Quantity: Net weight of honey should be in pounds or ounces AND grams and follow standard honey container weights found in FAC 29502https://codes.findlaw.com/ca/food-and-agricultural-code-formerly-agricultural-code/fac-sect-29502.html

  4. US Grade: see USDA Standards for Grades of Extracted Honey manual TABLE IV and TABLE V https://www.ams.usda.gov/sites/default/files/media/Extracted_Honey_Standard%5B1%5D.pdf

  5. Color: only if honey is packed in opaque container – see USDA Grades of Extracted Honey manual TABLE I – color designations 

 Here are some helpful links to help you better understand honey labeling: 

California Food & Agricultural Code FAC 29611 (Honey container labeling) https://codes.findlaw.com/ca/food-and-agricultural-code-formerly-agricultural-code/fac-sect-29611.html  

California Food & Agricultural Code FA 29502 (Standard honey container weight) https://codes.findlaw.com/ca/food-and-agricultural-code-formerly-agricultural-code/fac-sect-29502.html

National Honey Board honey labeling information https://www.honey.com/honey-industry/regulation/honey-labeling

USDA Standards for Grades of Extracted Honey Manual https://www.ams.usda.gov/sites/default/files/media/Extracted_Honey_Standard%5B1%5D.pdf 

Please let me know if you have any questions. 

Respectfully,
Jaime Garza, County of San Diego | Department of Agriculture, Weights and Measures | Apiary/Agricultural Standards Inspector, Phone: 858-614-7738 | Email: jaime.garza@sdcounty.ca.gov | Website: www.sdcountybees.org

Berlin's Bumbling Beekeepers Leave Swarms Without Homes

The Guardian Kate Connolly in Berlin August 9, 2019

Inexperienced hobbyists force bees to search often in vain
for suitable habitat across the city.

Schwarmfängers to the rescue? There are now about 10,000 bee colonies in Berlin, which is causing habitat and food shortages. Photograph: Evan North/Getty Images

Schwarmfängers to the rescue? There are now about 10,000 bee colonies in Berlin, which is causing habitat and food shortages. Photograph: Evan North/Getty Images

Humans are not the only ones in Berlin struggling to find accommodation. A beekeeping boom has led to swarms of bees forming novel new hives using anything from motorbikes to balconies in the German capital.

Germany’s beekeeping association has been forced to dispatch a growing band of swarm-catchers – or schwarmfänger – reachable via telephone hotlines, to deal with a deluge of incidents in which thousands of bees cluster round objects while scout bees go in search of suitable homes, such as a tree hollow, more often than not in vain.

“Many people are concerned about climate change and the dying bee populations and want to do something about it, which is great,” said Benedikt Polaczek, the chair of the Berlin Beekeepers’ Association. But he cautioned that the rise in the city’s bee population meant there was now a lack of adequate habitats and food.

He said: “We now have around 10,000 bee colonies in Berlin alone.”

Nationwide the German Beekeepers’ Association has grown by a quarter in the past six years from 92,000 members in 2013 to more than 120,000 today.

The number of Berlin beekeeping enthusiasts has increased, while offices and hotels are among those putting beehives on their rooftops, and beekeeper courses are oversubscribed. But the accusation levelled at often inexperienced hobbyists is that they do not always understand how to care for the bees.

The Berlin association now has over 50 schwarmfänger volunteers who offer a round-the-clock service to capture the several thousand bees in each swarm that are typically found enveloping everything from car roofs and bicycle frames to traffic lights and balconies.

Jonas Hörning, a bee-loving volunteer who has already saved 100 swarms, said the number of incidents had increased as the number of beekeepers soared.

He said: “The bees like to congregate in house entry ways or in other cavities. Balconies and window sills are also a favourite place.”

Swarm catchers are typically equipped with a breathable box, a sheet or tarpaulin, a bee brush and lemongrass oil to lure the bees into the box. Protective clothing is recommended for all but the most experienced schwarmfänger.

Berlin Kreuzberg, A swarm of bees cluster on a motorcycle. Photograph: Agencja Fotograficzna Caro/Alamy Stock Photo

Berlin Kreuzberg, A swarm of bees cluster on a motorcycle. Photograph: Agencja Fotograficzna Caro/Alamy Stock Photo

Hörning said: “The trick is to catch the majority of the colony together with the queen, and then the rest of the bees will usually follow.”

The method involves moving the cluster into the box while ensuring the queen, usually in the centre, is among them. If the swarm is on a tree branch it could be cut and put into the box with the bees on it, if the swarm is on an object – such as a bicycle or a lamppost – it could be sprayed with a mist of sugar water and then brushed gently into the box.

Colonies that are not caught will usually die, so there is a sense of urgency about the task.

The news magazine Spiegel recently reported that swarm catchers across Germany were in constant demand this year. It is not usually difficult to find new homes for captured bees because of a swarm exchange website where experienced or wold-be beekeepers can register their interest in taking over a rescued swarm.

Polaczek said it was possible to prevent colonies from swarming, by removing all the queen-bee swarm cells. He said: “Some people think they’ve managed it, but if you’ve overlooked just one swarm cell the bees will swarm anyway.”

The swarming season – usually late spring to early summer – is now over for this year. But concerns about the welfare of the bees are more acute than ever. Polaczek said: “There are so many bees they often can’t get enough food.” Some beekeepers are forced to feed their bees with sugar syrup to enable them to get through the winter.

Ideally beekeepers should spend five years in training, according to the association, although very few do. The organisation is critical of the fact that beekeeper starter kits are easily available online encouraging too many people to set up hives on a whim.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/aug/09/berlin-beekeepers-leave-swarms-without-homes-schwarmfangers

Agriculture’s Increasing Dependence On Pollination, Coupled With A Lack Of Crop Diversity, May Threaten Food Security And Stability

Catch the Buzz By Alan Harman August 12, 2019

agriculture.jpg

New research suggests global trends in farming practices are undermining the pollinators that crops depend on and putting agricultural productivity and stability at risk,

An international team of researchers has identified countries where agriculture’s increasing dependence on pollination, coupled with a lack of crop diversity, may threaten food security and economic stability.

The study, published in the journal Global Change Biology, is the first global assessment of the relationship between trends in crop diversity and agricultural dependence on pollinators.

Using annual data from the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization from 1961 to 2016, the study showed that the global area cultivated in crops that require pollination by bees and other insects expanded by 137%, while crop diversity increased by just 20.5%.

This imbalance is a problem, the researchers say, because agriculture dominated by just one or two types of crops only provides nutrition for pollinators during a limited window when the crops are blooming.

Maintaining agricultural diversity by cultivating a variety of crops that bloom at different times provides a more stable source of food and habitat for pollinators.

“This work should sound an alarm for policymakers who need to think about how they are going to protect and foster pollinator populations that can support the growing need for the services they provide to crops that require pollination,” said David Inouye, professor emeritus of biology at the University of Maryland and a co-author of the research paper.

Globally, a large portion of the total agricultural expansion and increase in pollinator dependence between 1961 and 2016 resulted from increases in large-scale farming of soybean, canola and palm crops for oil.

The researchers expressed concern over the increase in these crops because it indicates a rapid expansion of industrial farming, which is associated with environmentally damaging practices such as large monocultures and pesticide use that threaten pollinators and can undermine productivity.

Particularly vulnerable to potential agricultural instability are Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay and Bolivia, where expansion of pollinator-dependent soybean farms has driven deforestation and replaced rich biodiversity that supports healthy populations of pollinators with large-scale single-crop agriculture (monoculture).

Malaysia and Indonesia face a similar scenario from the expansion of oil palm farming.

“Farmers are growing more crops that require pollination, such as fruits, nuts and oil seeds, because there’s an increasing demand for them and they have a higher market value,” Inouye says.

“This study points out that these current trends are not great for pollinators, and countries that diversify their agricultural crops are going to benefit more than those that expand with only a limited subset of crops.”

In Europe, farmland is contracting as development replaces agriculture, but pollinator-dependent crops are replacing non-pollinator-dependent crops such as rice and wheat (which are wind pollinated).

The study says increasing need for pollination services without parallel increases in diversity puts agricultural stability at risk in places such as Australia, the United Kingdom, Germany, France, Austria, Denmark and Finland.

In the U.S., agricultural diversity has not kept pace with expansion of industrial-scale soybean farming.

“This work shows that you really need to look at this issue country by country and region by region to see what’s happening because there are different underlying risks,” Inouye says..

“The bottom line is that if you’re increasing pollinator crops, you also need to diversify crops and implement pollinator-friendly management.”

https://www.beeculture.com/catch-the-buzz-agricultures-increasing-dependence-on-pollination-coupled-with-a-lack-of-crop-diversity-may-threaten-food-security-and-stability/

The Beekeeper Of 'Honeyland' Knows All Too Well: Respect Nature, Or Get Stung

NPR Fresh Air With John Powers August 12, 2019

LISTEN ON NPR Fresh Air

Beekeeper Hatidze Muratova lives in a ruggedly mountainous area of Macedonia. She has a simple rule: When you harvest honey, you only take half — and leave the other half for the bees.  Neon

Beekeeper Hatidze Muratova lives in a ruggedly mountainous area of Macedonia. She has a simple rule: When you harvest honey, you only take half — and leave the other half for the bees. Neon

I'm not sure that any creature is more marvelous than the honeybee, with its highly evolved social organization, its ability to create honey, and, of course, the stinger that causes us to take heed whenever we hear buzzing. The pain it threatens makes it easy to think you need an almost-monastic devotion to become a beekeeper.

This idea is certainly common in books and films, where keeping bees has become a metaphor for withdrawal from the world — be it Marcello Mastroianni's disaffected ex-teacher in The Beekeeper, Peter Fonda's Vietnam-vet-turned-beekeeper in Ulee's Gold, or the hero of Michael Chabon's short novel, The Final Solution, in which a retireddetective who's surely Sherlock Holmes now inhabits what's called a "bee-crazed hermitage."

In real life, of course, keeping bees is a way of making a living — and not an easy one. This becomes clear in Honeyland, an exquisitely photographed documentary by Macedonian filmmakers Ljubomir Stefanov and Tamara Kotevska. Shot over three years, this elegant film — which nabbed several top prizes at Sundance — begins as the intimate portrait of a beekeeper who makes famously good honey, and then expands to become something of a parable.

The heroine is 50-something Hatidze Muratova, who lives in a tiny hut in a ruggedly mountainous area of Macedonia, 20 miles from the nearest town and seemingly hundreds of years from modernity. Hatidze spends her life looking after her argumentative mother, who can't move her legs and is going blind, and keeping bees as her family has done for generations. She works with hives high up on precarious mountain ledges and in trees hanging over the river. Her basic rule is simple: When you harvest honey, you only take half — and leave the other half for the bees.

It's a solitary, hardscrabble existence, and Hatidze doesn't enjoy being cut off from the world. Her life perks up when a migrant family moves into her barren dale along with their cattle and mobile home. Although these new neighbors are quarrelsome, she loves the companionship, especially with the kids. When the patriarch, Hussein, learns you can pick up some money from honey, she shows him the ropes of beekeeping. As you might guess, this generosity leads to trouble.

William Golding, who wrote Lord of the Flies, once said that men produce evil the way bees produce honey. And that happens here. But the evil in Honeyland is not the sort we usually see. In a Hollywood movie, Hatidze's story would be a melodrama in which her livelihood is threatened by some profit-obsessed multinational corporation involved in skullduggery.

Stefanov and Kotevska offer a more complicated truth. Hussein isn't some rich corporate thug who deliberately shatters the small, fragile ecosystem that lets Hatidze survive. He's a poor, hard-working father who struggles to support his family and is willing to cut corners producing honey to do that. Hustling and unpleasant he might be, but he's not what I'd call a bad man.

The real evil lies in the way that Hussein, like most of us, has come to see nature as a resource to be exploited. Like the impoverished farmers who burn forests in the Amazon or Indonesia, Hussein is so busy pursuing immediate gain that he doesn't understand the big picture. He doesn't care that if you don't leave behind half the honey, you wind up killing the very bees you need to keep making it.

That's why Honeyland speaks so well to our moment. Right now, the world's bees are being killed off in droves in a mysterious mass carnage known as colony collapse disorder. At the same time, huge parts of the planet are menaced by climate change. And most of the world, not least its leaders, can't be bothered to appreciate what Hatidze knows in her bones — that the ecosystems which sustain us are interconnected and surprisingly frail.

What makes her such a wonderful character isn't simply the decency and warmth revealed by her extraordinary snaggle-toothed smile. It's that Hatidze embodies a sane, respectful and engaged way of living with nature. She knows that if you want honey, you must find a way of living in harmony with the bees that create it. If you don't, you will be very badly stung.

https://www.npr.org/2019/08/12/748823769/the-beekeeper-of-honeyland-knows-all-too-well-respect-nature-or-get-stung

Read more:
https://honeyland.earth/
https://www.honeylandfilm.com/

HONEYLANDBUZZ:
https://www.npr.org/2019/08/12/748823769/the-beekeeper-of-honeyland-knows-all-too-well-respect-nature-or-get-stung
https://www.sundance.org/projects/honeyland
https://www.indiewire.com/2019/06/honeyland-trailer-beekeeping-documentary-neon-1202147645/
https://theplaylist.net/honeyland-trailer-sundance-doc-20190605/

Celebrate National Honey Bee Day at The Valley Hive Honey Competition & Recipe Contest

Celebrate National Honeybee Day
The Valley Hive's 4th Annual
HONEY COMPETITION AND RECIPE CONTEST
Sunday, August 18th from 4pm to 7pm
10538 Topanga Cyn Blvd in Chatsworth!

It's the perfect venue for celebrating NATIONAL HONEYBEE DAY.

Come on out to taste backyard honey and delectable recipes made with honey.  Meet local vendors.  Drink honey cocktails.  Learn how to make mead and how to cook with honey.  There will be kids activities. As well as a belly dance performance.

Got honey? Join dozens of other local beekeepers and show off your prize honey by entering our Honey Competition.  Submit 2 - 8oz jars of honey (1 labeled & 1 unlabeled) by Friday August 16th.

Not a beekeeper? Enter a favorite recipe that uses honey. From sweet to savory, give us your best dish!  Entries must be received by 3pm on Sunday August 18th.  Bring 3 servings for the Judges and more for the crowd to try at the event.

This event has always been held as a Fundraiser for honeybees, and this year is no different. 
This year, all donations received from this event will go to Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association.

honey competition winners 2018.jpg

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 Class #7: Sunday, August 11, 2019, 9AM-Noon, Hosted by The Valley Hive

beekeeping class 101 register post.jpg

Sunday, July 14th, 2019
9AM - Noon
Topic: Robbing, Winterizing, Treatments

The Valley Hive
10538 Topanga Canyon Blvd, Chatsworth, CA 91311

Actual Location for this Class: Details will be emailed to registered participants prior to class.
Parking for Class: Details will be emailed to registered participants prior to class.
Time: Check in open @ 8:30am. Class Starts @ 9am
For more info: https://www.losangelescountybeekeepers.com/beekeeping-class-101/
Class SIgn Up: https://www.losangelescountybeekeepers.com/new-products/beekeeping-class-101-1

REGISTRATION REQUIRED

 PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT REQUIRED

This class will take place in an apiary, therefore, protective equipment will be required.  If you do not have proper protective equipment you will NOT be able to participate in class and refunds will NOT be issued (all money collected for classes were a donation).

REMINDER:
We do not have Beekeeping Class 101 in September. LACBA members are volunteering at the Los Angeles County Fair Bee Booth! If you are an LACBA member, this is a great opportunity to share what you’ve learned in bee class with others.
Come, Join Us!

Honeyland in Theaters Now

Honeyland flyer.jpg

HONEYLAND
New Award Winning Film on Wild Beekeeper
In Theaters Now

The most awarded film of this year's Sundance Film Festival, HONEYLAND is a visually stunning documentary about one of Europe's last bee hunters, who follows an ancient golden rule, "take half, leave half for the bees." Through Haditze's story, the film explores sustainability and the delicate balance between humankind and nature. 

HONEYLAND PLAYING IN THEATERS
SHOWTIMES FOR HONEYLAND AROUND LOS ANGELES

Read more:
https://honeyland.earth/
https://www.honeylandfilm.com/

HONEYLANDBUZZ:
https://www.npr.org/2019/08/12/748823769/the-beekeeper-of-honeyland-knows-all-too-well-respect-nature-or-get-stung
https://www.sundance.org/projects/honeyland
https://www.indiewire.com/2019/06/honeyland-trailer-beekeeping-documentary-neon-1202147645/
https://theplaylist.net/honeyland-trailer-sundance-doc-20190605/

The Pollinators - Documentary (Screening)

The Pollinnators Film.jpg

The Pollinators is a cinematic journey around the United States following migratory beekeepers and their truckloads of honey bees as they pollinate the flowers that become the fruits, nuts and vegetables we all eat. 

We will talk to farmers, scientist, chefs, economists and academics along the way to give a broad perspective about the threats to honey bees and what it means to our food security.

The Pollinators
Date: Tuesday, September 17, 2019 Time: 6:30PM
Edwards Alhambra Renaissance Stadium 14 & IMAX
1 E Main Street, Alhambra, CA 91801
(See Below: This screening is based on audience demand.)

The producers of The Pollinators have partnered with Demand Film to bring The Pollinators to 100's of cities throughout the US and abroad. This is an innovative way to bring this film to your community that doesn't rely on traditional theater placements, but uses audience demand instead.

The Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association would like to thank member, Michael Pusateri, for promoting the screening of The Pollinators in Alhambra on Sept. 17th. The Pollinators can be requested for a showing in a theater, but they need 36 tickets sold to confirm it. Please reserve your ticket as soon as possible to help secure the event. This is the link to reserve tickets: https://tickets.demand.film/event/8213?ref=qzZJAgzA.

View Trailer

For information on the film: https://thepollinators.net
To reserve tickets for Alhambra Screening promoted by Michael Pusateri: https://tickets.demand.film/event/8213?ref=qzZJAgzA
You can request a screening near you.