Of Honeybees and World Food Supply

By: Georginna Pfost (Christian Science Monitor-A Christian Science Perspective) June 19, 2012

Pollinators, including bees, butterflies, and moths, as well as bats and birds, are a critical part of our planet’s ecosystem – the interconnected structure of life. In fact, one-third of humans’ food comes from insect-pollinated plants. In the process of collecting pollen and nectar to sustain themselves, pollinators help plants reproduce by spreading their pollen. And, in turn, the plants’ fruits and seeds provide food for other animals and people.

Consequently, many people (particularly backyard beekeepers like me) are celebrating the sixth annualPollinator Week (June 18-24) by doing such things as planting more varieties of flowers, buying more organically grown food, and eliminating the use of pesticides in our gardens. These actions help feed pollinators and prevent harm to them. But given recent news of spring honeybee die-offs in the Midwestern United States (apparently related to the sowing of pesticide-coated corn), I’m also taking time to specifically pray for these small creatures. 

Read more...

Related stories

Diggin' It

Pollination power in the garden