My View: Look Past Pesticides to Study Pollinator Health

 Portland Tribune    By Jeff Stone & Scott Dahlsman    June 26, 2014

As fellow state Pollinator Health Task Force members, we were disappointed to read the piece written by Aimee Code and Scott Hoffman Black of the Xerces Society (Protect pollinators like our lives depend on it, guest column, June 19).

The column included a number of inaccurate claims. It also suggests that some members of the task force are more interested in banning a product they don’t like instead of actually looking for ways to improve pollinator health.

The concerns about pesticide use and potential effects on bees are very important to all pesticide users, but especially those involved in agriculture. Oregon farmers depend on bees to pollinate many of their crops, but also depend on pesticide tools to control destructive pests.

Similarly, commercial beekeepers rely on healthy crops to optimize their pollination services. This means that Oregon growers and beekeepers have a lot at stake in this conversation, and each share a vested interest in ensuring that protecting bee health and the use of pesticides are not mutually exclusive.

Bee health is important to all of us, and nobody wants to see adverse incidents that add to bee population declines. That being said, it is easy to let emotion drive the conversation around these issues. We should instead let science be our guide.

While concerns about pesticides and bees have been around for decades...

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