Bee Products Used to Treat Cancer, Rheumatoid Arthritis

Apitherapy News  April 14, 2017      Honey bee products used as medicine Guardian, 4/13/2017

Bee products such as honey, venom have been used in folk medicine for thousands of years for treating wounds, ulcers, inflammation, infections, pain, allergies and cancer.

Bee venom therapy, the therapeutic application of bee venom have been used in traditional medicine to treat diseases, such as arthritis, rheumatism, pain, cancerous tumors and kin diseases. Bee venom contains a variety of peptides including melittin, apamin, adolapin, the mast – cell-degranulating peptide, enzymes (phospolipase A2), biologically active amines (that is histamine and epinephrine) and nonpeptide components with a variety of pharmaceutical properties.

Cancer treatment

Bee venom has been widely used in the treatment of tumours. Several cancer cells, including renal, lung, liver, prostate, mammary gland as well as leukemia cells can be targets of bee venom peptides such as melittin and phospholipase A2.

In recent study scientists reported that bee venom can induce apoptosis in cancer cells (in human leukemic U937cells) the key regulators in bee venom induced apoptosis are Bcl-2 and caspase-3 through down regulation of the ERK and Akt signal pathway. Melittin, a water-soluble toxic peptide derived from bee venom of Apis mellifera was reported to have inhibitory effects on hepatocellular carcinoma. Melittin inhibits tumor cell metastasis by reducing motility and migration via the suppression of Rac-1 dependent pathway, suggesting that melittin is a potent therapeutic agent for hepatocellular carcinoma. Melittin prevents liver cancer cells metastasis through inhibition of the Rac-1-dependent pathway.

Treatment for rheumatoid arthritis

Bee venom induces apoptosis in rheumatoid synovial cells through a decrease in BCL2 expression and an increase in BAX and caspase-3 expression. Bee venom induces apoptosis through caspase-3 activation in synovial fibroblasts of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

http://apitherapy.blogspot.com/2017/04/bee-products-used-to-treat-cancer.html

Also see: https://guardian.ng/features/insects-employed-to-treat-cancer-hiv/

American Apitherapy Society

From the American Apitherapy Society: The AAS is on the VERGE of officially ANNOUNCING the location & dates of the 2015 Charles Mraz Apitherapy Course & Conference CMACC in our February Newsletter! 
SIGN UP for our FREE monthly newsletter at www.apitherapy.org and look for clues on our Facebook page.

APITHERAPY is the medicinal use of beehive products made by honeybees including raw honey, pollen, propolis, royal jelly, bee venom, beeswax, drone larvae.

Visit AAS: http://www.apitherapy.org/

American Apitherapy Society Newsletter: October 2014

Apitherapy is the medicinal use of honeybee products. This includes honey, propolis, royal jelly, pollen, and bee venom. Founded in 1989,the AAS is a community of people interested in this natural, holistic practice.

 
The American Apitherapy Society Newsletter for October 2014 is now available. Subscribe and read at: http://www.apitherapy.org/about-aas/newsletter

Venom Gets Good Buzz As Potential Cancer Fighter

University of Illinois (Department of Bio-Engineering)   August 11, 2014

San Francisco, Aug. 11, 2014 — Bee, snake or scorpion venom could form the basis of a new generation of cancer-fighting drugs, scientists from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign report. They have devised a method for targeting venom proteins specifically to malignant cells while sparing healthy ones, which reduces or eliminates side effects that the toxins otherwise would cause.

The report was presented during the 248th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society. Attended by thousands of scientists, the meeting runs August 11 through 14 and features nearly 12,000 reports on new advances in science and other topics.

“We have safely used venom toxins in tiny nanometer-sized particles to treat breast cancer and melanoma cells in the laboratory,” says Dipanjan Pan, Ph.D., who led the study. “These particles, which are camouflaged from the immune system, take the toxin directly to the cancer cells, sparing normal tissue.”

Venom from snakes, bees and scorpions contains proteins and peptides which, when separated from the other components and tested individually, can attach to cancer cell membranes. That activity could potentially block the growth and spread of the disease, other researchers have reported. Pan, an assistant professor in the Department of Bioengineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and his team say that some of substances found in any of these venoms could be effective anti-tumor agents. But just injecting venoms into a patient would have side effects. Among these could be damage to heart muscle or nerve cells, unwanted clotting or, alternately, bleeding under the skin. So Pan and his team at Illinois set out to solve this problem.

He says that in the honeybee study, his team identified a substance in the venom called melittin that keeps the cancer cells from multiplying. Bees make so little venom that it’s not feasible to extract it and separate out the substance time after time for lab testing or for later clinical use. That’s why they synthesized melittin in the lab. To figure out how melittin would work inside a nanoparticle, they conducted computational studies. Next, they did the test and injected their synthetic toxin into nanoparticles. “The peptide toxins we made are so tightly packed within the nanoparticle that they don’t leach out when exposed to the bloodstream and cause side effects,” he explains. What they do is go directly to the tumor, where they bind to cancer stem cells, blocking their growth and spread, he adds. He says that synthetic peptides mimicking components from other venoms, such as those from snakes or scorpions, also work well in the nanoparticles as a possible cancer therapy.

Pan says the next step is to examine the new treatment approach in rats and pigs. Eventually, they hope to begin a study involving patients. He estimates that this should be in the next three to five years.

The researchers acknowledge funding from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With main offices in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio, and more than 161,000 members, ACS is the world’s largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences.

Paper published by the Royal Society of Chemistry

Edited version of release written by American Chemical Society

Read at: http://bioengineering.illinois.edu/news/venom-gets-good-buzz-potential-cancer-fighter

Bee Venom Kills Lung Cancer Cells

Apitherapy News   August 2, 2014

Cancer Cell Growth Inhibitory Effect of Bee Venom via Increase of Death Receptor 3 Expression and Inactivation of NF-Kappa B in NSCLC Cells

Our previous findings have demonstrated that bee venom (BV) has anti-cancer activity in several cancer cells. However, the effects of BV on lung cancer cell growth have not been reported. Cell viability was determined with trypan blue uptake, soft agar formation as well as DAPI and TUNEL assay. Cell death related protein expression was determined with Western blotting. An EMSA was used for nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) activity assay. BV (1-5 μg/mL) inhibited growth of lung cancer cells by induction of apoptosis in a dose dependent manner in lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460. Consistent with apoptotic cell death, expression of DR3 and DR6 was significantly increased. However, deletion of DRs by small interfering RNA significantly reversed BV induced cell growth inhibitory effects. Expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (caspase-3 and Bax) was concomitantly increased, but the NF-κB activity and expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited. A combination treatment of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like weak inducer of apoptosis, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, docetaxel and cisplatin, with BV synergistically inhibited both A549 and NCI-H460 lung cancer cell growth with further down regulation of NF-κB activity. These results show that BV induces apoptotic cell death in lung cancer cells through the enhancement of DR3 expression and inhibition of NF-κB pathway.

Read at: http://apitherapy.blogspot.com/ (post date 8/2/14)

Bee Venom Ointment Relieves Muscle Tension

Apitherapy News    July 25, 2014

Myorelaxant Effect of Bee Venom Topical Skin Application in Patients with RDC/TMD Ia and RDC/TMD Ib: A Randomized, Double Blinded Study

The aim of the study was the evaluation of myorelaxant action of bee venom (BV) ointment compared to placebo. Parallel group, randomized double blinded trial was performed. Experimental group patients were applying BV for 14 days, locally over masseter muscles, during 3-minute massage. Placebo group patients used vaseline for massage. Muscle tension was measured twice (TON1 and TON2) in rest muscle tonus (RMT) and maximal muscle contraction (MMC) on both sides, right and left, with Easy Train Myo EMG (Schwa-medico, Version 3.1).
Reduction of muscle tonus was statistically relevant in BV group and irrelevant in placebo group. VAS scale reduction was statistically relevant in both groups: BV and placebo. Physiotherapy is an effective method for myofascial pain treatment, but 0,0005% BV ointment gets better relief in muscle tension reduction and analgesic effect.

http://apitherapy.blogspot.com/

http://www.hindawi.com/journals/bmri/2014/296053/

Bee Venom's Healing Buzz

The New Age    By Tankiso Komane    May 6, 2014

Indicative of the rise in the number of people looking to the past for alternative healing methods, there’s been mounting interest across the world in apitherapy.

Traced back to thousands of years to Egypt and China, bee venom has been used in ancient medicine for centuries primarily as a treatment for arthritis.

Now celebrities such as Kate Middleton and Victoria Beckham are helping propel the trend into the 21st century.

Hollywood actress Gwyneth Paltrow, known for her love of unusual and holistic treatments, recently revealed she used bee venom therapy to treat an insect bite.

In China, throngs of patients are also reportedly swarming to acupuncture clinics to be given bee stings to treat or ward off a variety of illnesses, disorders and pain, even though there is there is no scientific evidence to support its effectiveness.

But what’s the buzz all about?

Melittin, the peptide found in the venom, tricks the skin into thinking it has been stung – but without any pain. The skin reacts by increasing blood circulation to the affected area, stimulating natural production of collagen and elastin, thus smoothing out fine lines and wrinkles.

In 2013, Washington University, in the US city of St Louis, published a study on the efficacy of milittine in countering the Aids virus.

In France, thousands of patients have benefited from bandages treated with honey at the abdominal surgery department of Limoges hospital.

Bee products are also infiltrating the cosmetics industry, used in skin-toning and anti-wrinkle creams. Part of the appeal rests with the natural and organic image of bee products.

“In Romania, we have the chance to maintain an unspoiled nature,” said Cornelia Dostetan, a member of the National Apitherapy Society.

Under communism, poverty meant that pesticides were rarely used and the country has never shifted to large-scale monoculture forms of agriculture. The result is that Romania retains a great diversity of flora, said Dostetan.

Certified organic, the Romanian brand Apiland, a specialist in raw pollen, has launched its products in France and Italy.

According to the last census in 2010, Romania counted 42000 beekeepers and more than 1.3 million colonies of bees.

Postolachi says she looks on the bees with gratitude. “These miniscule beings do wonders.”
With Relaxnews