LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 Class #6: Sunday, July 14, 2019, 9AM-Noon, Hosted by The Valley Hive

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Sunday, July 14th, 2019
9AM - Noon

The Valley Hive
10538 Topanga Canyon Blvd, Chatsworth, CA 91311

Actual Location for this Class: Details will be emailed to registered participants prior to class.
Parking for Class: Details will be emailed to registered participants prior to class.
Time: Check in open @ 8:30am. Class Starts @ 9am
For more info: https://www.losangelescountybeekeepers.com/beekeeping-class-101/
Class SIgn Up: https://www.losangelescountybeekeepers.com/new-products/beekeeping-class-101-1

REGISTRATION REQUIRED

 PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT REQUIRED

This class will take place in an apiary, therefore, protective equipment will be required.  If you do not have proper protective equipment you will NOT be able to participate in class and refunds will NOT be issued (all money collected for classes were a donation).

LACBA Meeting Monday, May 6, 2019

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Next Meeting
Monday, May 6, 2019
Time: Doors Open: 6:30PM
Meeting Starts: 7:00PM

Mt. Olive Lutheran Church 
3561 Foothill Boulevard 
La Crescenta, CA  91214


Agenda:

a.      Welcome

b.     Flag Salute

c.      Introduce the board Kevin Vice president, Merrill Secretary, ElRay Member at large and I your president.   Bill our treasurer passed away March 26th.   We will have a remembrance tonight at the end of the meeting.

d.     Select Raffle ticket seller, index cards for questions

e.      New Members and/or guests

f.       Thank Doug Noland for the treat du jour

First/Second year beekeeping - Speaker (7 minutes)
A selected beekeeper, Murry, to speak on how they got into beekeeping and their first two years of beekeeping. Specifically, on the mistakes made, the trials, tribulations, problems.

Topic Speaker
Rob Stone, Orange County Beekeepers
Reading the frames.  What you can tell about your bees from the clues on the frame.

Main Topic: Receiving your Packages

  • How’d it go?

  • How many gallons of syrup have they ate?

  • Have you opened them other than sliding lid for syrup addition?

  • April 25th  it’s been 11 days so should be inspecting yesterdayish eggs? Larva? capped brood?    What’s your plan?  Swarm control?

Meeting minutes: Mary Ann Laun

Secretary Report: Merrill Kruger

Treasurer's Report.    Jon Reese

Membership Report:  Cheryl Thiele

Website: Eva Andrews

Education: Mary Landau –  opportunities to go speak.   

I have a request.  Someone to go along to a community meeting about beekeepers and their pesky bees in the area.  I want some one to buffer me (and maybe me them) when I explain the beekeeping ordinance legalizing bees and how homeowners can move neighbors to comply with the ordinance. (Get the state apiary inspector’s number) explain bees foraging

Beekeeping 101: Keith Roberts. How did bee class go and what’s in the next class

Upcoming events:

  • Eaton canyon nature center is having a one-day event.  June 2nd.   Educate.  Observation hive sell honey. Partner with BASC.  Who will bring an observation hive?  We have honey 50 bears (?more bears?) and sticks  and sample spoons.  Need banner & pamphlets

  • Elray  Bennett’s honey Farm event. May be a donation to our club is in order for showing up and manning the train from Bennett’s

LA County Fair: Cindy Caldera

Upcoming Talk: Michele Colopy Pollinator Stewardship June 3rd  talk on Migratory beekeeping and why it is so hard to keep bees alive.

How can you increase the production of propolis in your colonies which will increase the health of the hive.  Propolis trap on the walls, saw cutting rips into the walls or roughing up walls with steel brush. 

What do you see, what are you doing this time of year?  Swarms? 

What’s blooming

Index cards Q&A

Next month:  Splits, mite check-treat, honey flow?

Raffle!!!

[You can now review LACBA Minutes and past LACBA Buzzings! Newsletters on our website on the LACBA Meeting Archives page : https://www.losangelescountybeekeepers.com/lacba-meeting-archives ]

Beekeeping Supplies & Equipment - Just What You Need!

Basic Essentials List for Beginning Beekeepers

A Bee Hive

The Hive - Langstroth (from the bottom up):

Hive Stand - This is a platform to keep the hive off the ground. It improves circulation, reduces dampness in the hive, and helps keep ants, bugs, leaves, and debris from getting into the hive. It can be made of anything solid enough to support the weight of a full beehive. Wooden hive stands are available for sale but bricks, concrete blocks, pallets, and found lumber are just as good. It’s helpful to place the legs of the stand in cans filled with used motor oil to deter ants from climbing up the legs and into the hive. The stand should be strong enough to support one hive or a number of colonies. What is important to remember is that the hive needs to be at least 6 inches off the ground.

Bottom Board - Is placed on top of the hive stand and is the floor of the hive. Bees use it as a landing board and a place to take off from. 

Entrance Reducer - Is basically a stick of wood used to reduce the size of the entrance to the hive. It helps deter robbing.

Hive Boxes/Supers - Come in three sizes: deep, medium and shallow. Traditionally, 2 deep boxes have been used as brood chambers with 3 or 4 or more boxes (medium or shallow) on top as needed for honey storage. Many beekeepers use all medium boxes throughout the hive. This helps reduce the weight of each box for lifting. If you have back problems or are concerned about heavy lifting, you could even use shallow boxes all throughout the hive. So, 6 boxes as a minimum for deep and medium. More if you wanted to use only shallow boxes. You will only need two boxes to start out, adding boxes as needed for extra room and honey storage.

Frames and Foundation - For each box you have for your hive, you will need 10 frames that fit that box. Frames can be wooden with beeswax foundation or all plastic with a light coating of beeswax. The bees don't care and will use both equally well. Foundation is intended to give the bees a head start on their comb building and helps minimize cross comb building that makes it difficult to remove and inspect. You can buy all beeswax foundation or plastic foundation with a thin coat of beeswax applied to it. Alternatively, you can provide empty frames and let the bees build their comb from scratch but that can be a bit tricky and it takes the bees longer to get established. 

Top Cover: The top cover can be as simple as a flat sheet of plywood. We prefer the top covers made with laminated pieces to make a flat board and extra cross bracing to help hold the board flat for years. Plywood tends to warp over time. You can also use a telescoping cover, but they require an additional inner cover. 

Paint - All parts of your hive that are exposed to the weather should be painted with (2 coats) of a non-toxic paint. Do not paint the inside of the hive or the entrance reducer. Most hives are painted white to reflect the sun, but you can use any light colors. Painting your hives different colors may help reduce drift between the colonies. If your hive will not be in your own bee yard, you may want to paint your name and phone number on the side of the hive.

We primarily work with the Langstroth hive but you can also use the Top Bar Hive or the Warre Hive.

Tools & Supplies:

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Bee Brush - A beekeeper needs a brush to gently move the bees from an area of observation when looking for a queen and when harvesting frames of honey. Use a brush that has long, soft, flexible, yellow bristles. Don’t use a dark, stiff brush with animal hair, or a paint brush.

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Duct Tape - You’ll have lots of uses for duct tape, might want to keep it handy.                                                                                                                                                            

 

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Hive Tool - A hive tool is the most useful piece of beekeeping equipment. It can be used to pry up the inner cover, pry apart frames, scrape and clean hive parts, scrape wax and propolis out of the hive, nail the lid shut, pull nails, and scrape bee stingers off skin. The hive tool has two parts: the wedge or blade and the handle. Hive tools are often fitted with brightly-colored, plastic-coated handles which helps the beekeeper locate the hive tool while working. 

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Feeder - You may want to have a feeder with sugar syrup to give your new bees a boost in their new home. Its the helping hand they need to get started building comb.

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Smoker - Examining a hive is much easier when you use a smoker. Use it to puff smoke into the entrance before opening the hive and to blow smoke over the frames once the hive is opened. This helps the beekeeper to manage the bees. Cool smoke helps to settle the bees. Smoking the bees initiates a feeding response causing preparation to possibly leave the hive due to a fire. The smoke also masks the alarm pheromone released by the colony’s guard bees when the hive is opened and manipulated. Smoke must be used carefully. Too much can drive bees from the hive. A smoker is basically a metal can with a bellows and a spout attached to it. We prefer to use a smoker with a wire cage around it. A large smoker is best as it keeps the smoke going longer. It can be difficult to keep a smoker lit (especially for new beekeepers). Practice lighting and maintaining the smoker. Burlap, rotted wood shavings, pine needles, eucalyptus, cardboard, and cotton rags are good smoker fuels.

Protective Clothing:

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Bee Suit - For the best protection, full bee suits are recommended. You can also use a bee jacket.

But whether or not a suit is used, a beekeeper's clothing should be white or light in color (bees generally do not like dark colors and will attack dark objects). Avoid woolen and knit material. You will want to wear clothing both that will protect you and you don’t mind getting stained (bees produce waste that shows up as yellowish marks on your clothing). You’ll want to close off all potential to getting stung by wearing high top boots or tucking your pants into your socks and securing your cuffs with rubber bands or duct tape.

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Bee Gloves - Long, leather, ventilated gloves with elastic on the sleeves help protect the hands and arms from stings.

Hat and Veil - Even the most experienced beekeepers wear a hat and veil to protect their head, face, and eyes from bee stings. Wire veils keep bees farther away from the face than those made of cloth. Black veiling is generally easier to see through. Make sure the veil extends down below and away from your neck.

That’s it!

Once you have all you need, expenses can be kept to a minimum. With the right care, equipment, tools, and clothing will last a long time. If your hive becomes overcrowded, just add another box or two. Or, you may find you’ll want to split your hive – then you’ll have two! If honey is overflowing, just add another box or two. And, great! – You’ll have lots of yummy honey!!

A note on protective clothing: There was a time when we could safely visit our bees wearing little protective clothing. With the arrival of Africanized Honey Bees into Southern California we've come to realize the potential danger of an aggressive hive and have learned to exercise caution when approaching our bees. A once gentle hive could be invaded and taken over by a small aggressive swarm in a few days. These bees are unpredictable and vigorously defend their hives. Protective clothing such as a bee suit, veil and gloves will help keep stings to a minimum in the bee yard if worn correctly.

Suppliers:

Local supplier:

Los Angeles Honey Supply Company
Pierce Beekeeping Supply Company
Pierco Beekeeping Equipment
The Valley Hive

Outside Los Angeles area:

Dadant
Better Bee
Brushy Mountain Bee Farm
Glory Bee
Mann Lake
Shastina Millwork
Western Bee Supplies

LACBA Meeting: Monday, February 5, 2018

Our next meeting will be held Monday, February 5, 2018.
Open Board Meeting: 6:30pm
General Meeting: 7:00pmLocation:
Mount Olive Lutheran Church (Shilling Hall)
3561 Foothill Blvd.
La Crescenta, CA 91214

LACBA members who attended the 2017 California State Beekeepers Association Convention will give their reports on what's new in beekeeping.

Meetings of the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association are open to the public. All are welcome!

Congratulations to Apiary Inspector II Scott Wirta - Unsung Hero Award

The Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association would like to congratulate Apiary Inspector II Scott Wirta for receiving the "Unsung Hero" Award for 2017. We'd also like to thank Inspector Wirta for all his good work with bees and bee keepers. When we requested a few words about his award, Inspector Wirta replied:

"It was an honor to be selected Unsung Hero this year by the Los Angeles County Agricultural Commissioner’s Department for my work with feral bees. I do believe, however, a group of bee keepers are truly the unsung heroes. I am talking about the bee keeper who will help when an unwanted swarm shows up. Many a bee keeper has stepped in and helped with their neighbors’ bee issues. Whether it is helping a neighbor with a removal, helping the poor who cannot afford services, or just talking to a distressed individual with a swarm on the property,
bee keepers are an asset to the community and the real unsung heroes."


http://acwm.lacounty.gov/wps/portal/acwm

LACBA Meeting Monday, October 2, 2017

LACBA MEETING - Monday, October 2, 2017. (Meeting Starts: 7PM, Open Board Meeting 6:30PM). All are Welcome! Mount Olive Lutheran Church, 3561 Foothill Blvd., La Crescenta, CA 91214 (In Shilling Hall). Parking next to the church, overflow parking behind the church.

 

Who Is Clyde Steese?

Bill's Bees Buzz   By Bill Lewis   September 22, 2015

Where’s Clyde? It’s hot, dry, the sun’s beating down out here in the apiary; I’ve got hours to go before I call it a day. Every few minutes I look up expecting to see Clyde. Clyde Steese is my business partner and co-owner of Bill’s Bees. But, Clyde's not here!

Clyde’s at the fair! At the fair! And I’m here, in the hot, dry sun with the bees!!! Come September, Clyde goes to the fair. Clyde’s been volunteering at the LA County Fair Bee Booth for 19 years, but since he took over the chairmanship of the Bee Booth, seven years ago, Clyde disappears from the apiary and heads off for five weeks of intense honey bee overload. It’s a monumental task to design, set up, and organize the Bee Booth. Once the fair opens, Clyde devotes all his time, energy, and resources to educating thousands of school children, teachers, parents, and fair goers about honey bees, the important role bees play in our lives, the problems facing bees today, and what can be done to help the bees.

The Bee Booth is a major highlight of the fair and the only fundraiser of the year for the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association. Profits from honey sales are used to support all our club’s educational activities throughout the year and enables the LACBA to send member representatives to the California State Beekeepers Convention. Clyde is forever grateful to his wife, Jan, for the time she puts in at the fair, and truly appreciates the enormous contribution by LACBA member, Cyndi Caldera, who organizes and manages the hundreds of volunteer hours needed to staff the booth. He gives heartfelt thanks to all the fellow beekeepers who volunteer. It's truly an effort of many worker bees working together.

Before the Bees! Clyde grew up on a 150 acre farm in New Bedford, PA, the oldest of 6 siblings.  Clyde was blessed with the gift of hard farm work where he learned to care for the livestock, developed teamwork, and understood that safety should always be at the forefront. Instilled with a strong work ethic, Clyde was always busy. He was a member of the Boy Scouts of America and Future Farmers of America. By the time he was 17, Clyde was smitten, and in 1966, married his high school sweetheart, Janice Cook. Jan's the love of his life and this October they'll celebrate 46 years of marriage.

Clyde’s service to country: Clyde served in the US Air Force during the Vietnam War from 1965-1969. He was assigned to the 3rd US Marine Corps K-9 Scout Dog Program. A high percentage of the best handlers come from farms where they handled hunting dogs and farm stock. Clyde’s high intelligence, character and physical ability as well as his experience growing up on a farm made him an excellent Scout Dog Handler. 

Clyde served 3 tours in Vietnam, fighting in the battles of Hanoi, Da Nang, and Dung Ha. He received the Bronze Star for bravery and was awarded the Purple Heart for injuries during the Da Nang Tet Offensive. Clyde was honorably discharged in 1969, and is a lifetime member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars.

Moving On! After the war, Jan and Clyde headed for California. Clyde attended San Francisco State and graduated with a BA in Science. They moved to Southern California and settled in Sunland. Clyde and Jan still reside in the same house where they raised their two boys, Gary & Carl. They have two grandsons, Bret and Sean. Gary and Sean, along with nephew, LeRoy, are emerging beekeepers with Bill’s Bees. 

Clyde mastered the craft of leather smithing. Take a look the next time you get a chance to see the 1985 western, 'Pale Rider.' Clyde crafted all Clint Eastwood's leather work for the film. He's also carved many leather pieces for the John Wayne family. He later went to work for the City of Burbank, and retired in 2008, after nearly twenty-five years of service.

How the bees found Clyde! About 20 years ago, a swarm of bees took up residence in an orange tree in Clyde’s backyard. He didn’t have any luck getting someone to come take the bees away or to help him remove them for a reasonable price. So, Clyde caught the bees in a cardboard box. Jan says the next night Clyde came home with a hive. (Surprise!) When she asked, “Why?” Clyde very quietly replied, “It’s something I’ve always wanted to do.” And that was that! Jan says that all the years they’ve been married he never once mentioned he wanted to keep bees. Clyde soon had six more hives. 

Being retired really fired Clyde's passion for beekeeping. Before he knew it, Clyde amassed over 25 hives and his bee yard outgrew his back yard. Jan rolls her eyes and might seem a little annoyed by all this beesness, but I think she secretly feeds the frenzy. When Jan worked for the Burbank Library, she brought home all the new books on bees before they hit the shelves. Clyde consumed them. 

Clyde is another one of those who has really been sucked in by the bees and is addicted to beekeeping. He showed up at the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association one night eager for information. I was President of the club at the time and we became fast friends. Clyde continued to grow in his knowledge of beekeeping and a few yeares later, he was voted in as President. Clyde served two terms as President of the Los Angeles Beekeepers Association.

For nearly ten years, side by side, Clyde and I have worked the bees together. Sometimes we begin our days early in the morning when it’s cool, checking our hives, making sure the bees are healthy and not starving, that they’re producing honey and pollen, and that the queen is going about her business of making more bees. Some days are long, hot, and dry, like today. Sometimes our days begin at dusk when we load our bees onto trucks and drive through the night so they’re ready to off load early in the morning for almond pollination 'the grandest pollination event in the universe'. 

For the past five years, Bill's Bees has hosted theLos Angeles Beekeepers Association Beekeeping Class 101. This year we had over 100 newbees up on the mountain top of Bill's Bees Bee Farm to learn about beekeeping. We teach responsible beekeeping for an urban environment adhering to Best Management Practices for the benefit of all: humans, animals, beekeepers, and bees.  

Helping others! Clyde has lived his life working hard, staying busy, and helping others. He is always thinking of how he can help others without thinking of what he can get back. Clyde’s enthusiasm towards bees is infectious and he has inspired many young hobby beekeepers. He has gone so far as to give away enough equipment and plenty of time to get many people started with beekeeping.

School of Hard Knocks (or Bee Stings)!  Since a boy, Clyde has believed in the rule of Safety First! But, as any experienced beekeeper knows, you never know what to expect with bees. Clyde's certainly been through the beekeeper's school of hard knocks. Have you ever been stung so many times through your bee suit because sweat was sticking your suit to your skin that you had a reaction to the venom?  Clyde has. Last summer, I rushed him to the emergency room because of an adverse reaction to too many stings. He figured that somehow the bees were getting into his bee suit. He also knew we needed to get the job done that day and didn’t say anything about it. Finally, he says, “I’ve had enough." After several hours in the hospital and numerous steroid injections he was released. The doctor determined that he was not allergic, but just reacted to too many stings. Later, we discovered a tiny hole in his veil. Clyde was back out in the bee yard the next day. 

Clyde is a member of the American Beekeeping Federation and the California State Beekeepers Association. He serves on the California State Certified Farmers Market Advisory Committee. Clyde’s love of travel takes him around the world meeting beekeeperstwenty-five years of service.

Clyde boasts of over 70 candles on his last birthday cake (that’s because he looks twenty years younger). He told me whenever he thinks of retiring he can’t imagine what his days would be like without the buzzing of the bees. Clyde celebrates the dignity of work and the humility of service. He's spent his life working in service for others, be it human, animal, or bee. I am proud to call him my business partner and my friend. Bill's Bees' honors Clyde’s dedication at the fair, and enjoys sharing our time, energy, and enthusiasm to further the understanding of bees and appreciation of the art of beekeeping. 

Where’s Clyde in “Bill’s Bees?” We tossed around changing the name of our company but nothing seemed to fit. We figured ‘Bill’s Bees’ has worked so far; we’d let beekeepers and worker bees work, and not fiddle with what works!

As for Bill, I'm heading over to Liane's Laboratory; curious to see what my brilliant wife is brewing up with the oils and spices of nature's garden and our honey bee gifts of the hive.

Enjoy,

Bill 
Bill's Bees 

Read at: http://billsbees.com/blogs/news/53957509-who-is-clyde-steese

LACBA MEETING: Monday, June 1, 2015

REMINDER: Next LACBA Meeting is Monday, June 1, 2015
WHEN:  6:45PM Meet, Mingle, and Talk Bees   7:00PM Meeting Starts
WHERE:  Mount Olive Lutheran Church, 3561 Foothill Boulevard, La Crescenta, CA 91214
Come, learn about bees! All are Welcome!
http://www.losangelescountybeekeepers.com/meetings

Legalize Beekeeping, L.A.

The Los Angeles Times    By The Times editorial board   12/27/13 

Los Angeles should follow the lead of other major cities and draft rules that allow residents to keep bees, while providing some common-sense protections for neighbors. There's already an established backyard beekeeping community in Los Angeles despite the fact that it is not legal. The growing urban agriculture movement has spurred more interest in homegrown hives (in part because the bees are needed to pollinate the new urban crops) and more confusion over what is and isn't allowed.

New York City allowed illicit apiarists to come out of the shadows in 2010, and since then hobbyists have established hives on building roofs and in backyards. The city set basic rules: Colonies must be in well-maintained, movable frame hives with a constant water source, in a location that doesn't pose a nuisance. Beekeepers file a one-page hive registration form with the city health department each year.

Santa Monica permitted beekeeping in 2011 with similar requirements. Residents are allowed two hives per backyard, and the hives must be at least five feet from the property lines. Apiarists who don't follow the rules or who let their hives become a nuisance to neighbors face fines or misdemeanor charges.

Both cities said they've had no major problems; beekeepers have largely followed the rules or moved their hives in response to complaints. And city officials said there's been a benefit: a larger network of amateur beekeepers to call upon to remove swarms rather than exterminate them.

There will understandably be some concern and fear from neighbors — a swarm of feral honeybees can look like something out of a horror movie. Beekeeping experts say there are already lots of naturally occurring, unmanaged hives in the region. A managed hive in which bees have adequate food and space is less likely to produce a swarm.

We need bees. We want more bees. It's time to legalize beekeeping.

http://www.latimes.com/opinion/editorials/la-ed-beekeeping-20131227,0,360002.story#ixzz2ohhxSJDr

LACBA Buzzings!!! Newsletter from July 2013 Meeting

Buzzings!!! Newsletter from our July 2013 Meeting is now ready for your reading enjoyment. Thank you to LACBA Secretary, Stacy McKenna, for a wonderful job. Some of the topics include: the LA County Fair, Urban Beekeeping, Africanized Honey Bees, Questions from the Floor.