The Asian Hornet

This week there were three talks about the Asian hornet at Apimondia 2019 at Montreal, Canada.

Photo: Vespa velutina. Courtesy of The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA). Crown Copyright - Jean Haxaire.

Photo: Vespa velutina. Courtesy of The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA). Crown Copyright - Jean Haxaire.

Prof. Stephen Martin (Salford University, UK) talking about Asian hornet biology at the OIE (World Organisation for Animal Health) symposium at Apimondia 2019 at Montréal, Canada

Prof. Stephen Martin (Salford University, UK) talking about Asian hornet biology at the OIE (World Organisation for Animal Health) symposium at Apimondia 2019 at Montréal, Canada

Carreck Consultancy LTD Facebook Post dated September 11, 2019: https://www.facebook.com/CarreckBees/.
“Prof. Stephen Martin (Salford University, UK) talking about Asian hornet biology at the OIE (World Organisation for Animal Health) symposium at Apimondia 2019 at Montréal, Canada. There were three talks about the Asian hornet in Europe and in South Korea. Much useful discussion took place on new tracking methods and experiments aimed at better understanding the biology and spread of the pest.

This comes against the background of a new confirmed finding yesterday of a single Asian hornet near Ashford, Kent, some considerable distance from previous findings. The Defra Asian hornet page with details of all previous sightings is here: https://www.gov.uk/…/news/asian-hornet-uk-sightings-in-2018…

Further information about the Asian hornet can be found here:
http://www.nationalbeeunit.com/index.cfm?sectionid=117

Prof. Martin’s book “The Asian hornet - threats, biology and expansion” can be purchased from the IBRA website: http://www.ibrabee.org.uk/component/k2/item/3634

The book “The Asian hornet handbook” by Sarah Bunker can be purchased from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Asian-Hornet-Handbook…/…/ref=sr_1_1?

If you think you may have seen an Asian hornet, you should visit the UK Non-Native species Secretariat website: http://www.nonnativespecies.org/alerts/index.cfm where there is an identification guide and app for your phone and information on where to report it.

Next week 9th - 15th September is the British Beekeepers Association Asian Hornet week. Further details can be found on the BBKA website: https://www.bbka.org.uk/2019-asian-hornet-week

And further information about the Asian hornet can be found here:

http://www.nonnativespecies.org/alerts/index.cfm?id=4

https://www.bbka.org.uk/pages/faqs/category/asian-hornet-faq


Invasive Asian Giant Hornets Gound on Vancouver Island

CTV News Staff / Vancouver Island September 11, 2019

While Asian giant hornet stings are rare, the large volume of venom they carry can cause localized swelling, redness, itchiness and significant pain. (BC government)

While Asian giant hornet stings are rare, the large volume of venom they carry can cause localized swelling, redness, itchiness and significant pain. (BC government)

For the first time ever, Asian giant hornets have been discovered on Vancouver Island.

The invasive species was found in the Nanaimo area in August, according to the Ministry of Agriculture, sparking concern for honeybee populations on the island.

Asian giant hornets are known to feed on honeybees and other large insects and are capable of destroying a beehive in a short time, according to the province.

The Ministry of Agriculture says it is already at work investigating how it can assist Vancouver Island beekeepers with hive surveillance and with trapping the invasive hornets in the spring.

While three Asian giant hornets were found in Nanaimo this summer, the province is unsure if more will appear next year as the large insect lies dormant during the fall and winter seasons.

Anyone who sees one of these types of hornets is asked to contact the Invasive Species Council of B.C. at 1-888-933-3722 or file a report through the government's "Report Invasives" mobile phone app found here.

According to the province, the hornets make their nests in the ground and not in trees or buildings. If people stumble upon a nest, officials recommend that they avoid it and leave the area.

While Asian giant hornet stings are rare, the large volume of venom they carry can cause localized swelling, redness, itchiness and significant pain.

If stung, the province recommends that people treat it as they would a regular bee or wasp sting by placing an ice pack or cold compress on the sting to reduce inflammation and the spread of venom. Avoid rubbing the sting as it can cause the venom to spread into surrounding tissue.

The province warns that if people are stung 10 or more times they are at a higher risk of developing toxic or allergic reactions, such as dizziness or headaches. Anyone who feels like they are developing these symptoms should seek medical attention immediately.

https://vancouverisland.ctvnews.ca/invasive-asian-giant-hornets-found-on-vancouver-island-1.4589009


Asian Hornets Attack and Brutally Kill Bees!

BBC Earth Unplugged Published August 9, 2018

European bees are defenceless against the killer Asian Hornets, and even humans need to look out.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QzeDskBHl8U