Beekeeping Class 101: Sunday, April 14, 2019

beekeeping class 101 register post.jpg

Sunday, April 14th

REGISTRATION REQUIRED
 Register by Thursday April 11th to receive class location and details needed to attend class.

 PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT REQUIRED

This class will take place in an apiary, therefore, protective equipment will be required.  If you do not have proper protective equipment you will NOT be able to participate in class and refunds will NOT be issued (all money collected for classes were a donation).

Class Topic: 

  • Get comfortable with handling your bees

  • Hive inspection techniques – what to look for on you first hive inspection after installing your package of bees or nuc of bees.

  • Be prepared for a quiz!  Do you remember what was covered in class last month?

https://www.losangelescountybeekeepers.com/beekeeping-class-101

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 - #6: July 15, 2018, 9AM-Noon, at The Valley Hive

UPDATE: From The Valley Hive, Saturday, 7/14/18, 12:09AM

The next Beekeeping Class 101 will be held Sunday, July 15, 2018, 9AM-Noon, at The Valley Hive apiary location: 9633 Baden Avenue, Chatsworth. Bee Suits Required for this class.

TOPIC: VARROA MITE PART II

Last month we tested for varroa mites in the bee yard. Hopefully, many of you have had the chance to perform a varroa mite test on your own hives. We look forward to having you share your experience and hearing about the results.

This month we will be discussing the various types of treatments available to control this pesky pest! 

Are you an experienced beekeeper? We welcome your help and are always happy to have volunteers.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION:

MEET AT OUR BEE YARD AT 9633 BADEN AVENUE.

Please be prompt - class is this Sunday at 9am.  

Please respect our neighbors. We are guests on this property, and we are a very large group. 

Limited parking is available inside the gate and also on Baden Avenue.

The bee yard is located off a dirt road; a short walk up a hill from the parking lot. 

PROPER ATTIRE IS A MUST!

Full suit with veil and gloves are required to attend class.

Closed shoes/boots are required.

Bring bottled water. It is HOT!!

Bring your own labeled tools, smoker, and smoker fuel  for a chance to receive more hands-on learning opportunities.

NEED SUPPLIES:

Our store, located at 10538 Topanga Cyn Blvd, will open at 8am on Sunday.

REFRESHMENTS:

We will meet back at our Topanga location for refreshments after class, where you will have the opportunity to ask your beekeeping questions.

If you have any last minute questions or concerns, you can contact The Valley Hive at (818) 280-6500 or via email at info@thevalleyhive.com

See you in class!
The Valley Hive

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 - #6: July 15, 2018, 9AM-Noon, at The Valley Hive

The next Beekeeping Class 101 will be held Sunday, July 15, 2018, 9AM-Noon, at The Valley Hive apiary location: 9633 Baden Avenue, Chatsworth. Bee Suits Required for this class

 

MEET AT OUR BEE YARD AT 9633 BADEN AVENUE.
Please be prompt - class is this Sunday at 9am.  
Please respect our neighbors.
We are guests on this property, and we are a very large group. 
Limited parking is available inside the gate and also on Baden Avenue.
The bee yard is located off a dirt road; a short walk up a hill from the parking lot. 

PROPER ATTIRE IS A MUST!
Full suit with veil and gloves are required to attend class.
Closed shoes/boots are required.
Bring bottled water.
Bring your own labeled tools, smoker, and smoker fuel  for a chance to receive more hands-on learning opportunities.

NEED SUPPLIES? Our store is located at 10538 Topanga Cyn, and it will open at 8am in case you need to purchase any last minute supplies.

REFRESHMENTS!
You are invited back to our Topanga location for refreshments and will have an opportunity to ask any questions you may have regarding your personal hive. 

If you have any last minute questions or concerns, you can contact The Valley Hive at (818) 280-6500 or via email at info@thevalleyhive.com. 

See you in class!
The Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association
The Valley Hive

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 - #2

A special thank you goes out to all the volunteers who came out to lend a hand today at the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association Beekeeping 101 Class - Class #2 at The Valley Hive.

Frame building - Nick Maggiore (Photo: The Valley Hive)

Jon Reese, Clyde Steese, Merrill Kruger, Juan Ruvalcaba at the box building station. (Photo: The Valley Hive)Merrill Kruger does some heavy lifting. (Photo: The Valley Hive)

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 (Class #2) Saturday, March 11, 2017

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 (Class #2) Saturday, March 11, 2017, 9am-noon
Topic: Building a Hive, Hive Placement, How to Install a Package.
NO BEE SUIT REQUIRED FOR THIS CLASS.

 THE VALLEY HIVE
9633 BADEN AVENUE
CHATSWORTH, CA 93063
(818) 280-6500

https://www.facebook.com/events/1669044520062856/

BRING A FOLDING CHAIR. Seating is limited.

info@thevalleyhive.com
Map: 
http://www.thevalleyhive.com/contacts/

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 - Class #8 - Sunday, October 16, 2016

Class #8 of the 2016 Season of LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 is Sunday, October 16, 2016, 9AM-Noon at Bill's Bees Bee Yard. Topics covered will be: Keeping your bees alive through the dearth. BEE SUITS REQUIRED. Look forward to seeing you at BEE CLASS! All are Welcome! All you need to know about the class is listed below. /beekeeping-classes-losangeles/

For all who have NOT been attending our Beekeeping Class 101 and have inquired about coming to the October 16, 2016 class and DO NOT HAVE A BEE SUIT, here's a note from the Beekeeper: "I do not think this is the best class for someone new to start with. I would tell these people to plan to attend in 2017 if we offer a new series of classes starting in Feb. If they can't wait, they can probably buy suits from The Valley Hive. http://www.thevalleyhive.com/ BEE SUITS ARE REQUIRED!!!

Beekeeping Class 101 - Sunday, August 21, 2016 at Bill's Bees Bee Yard

UPDATE: Next Beekeeping Class 101 is Sunday, August 21, 2016, 9AM-Noon at Bill's Bees Bee Yard. BEE SUITS REQUIRED. We may do some honey extracting during this class. If you have honey frames to extract let Bill Lewis know in advance and we will arrange to extract your honey as part of our bee class. Send Bill an email at billsbees@wildblue.net or call 818-312-1691 to get on the bee class extracting schedule. We can provide a bucket for extracted honey or bring your own. Look forward to seeing you. For more info on our Beekeeping Class 101 - see below.

(NOTE: The date was originally posted as August 14 but that was incorrect.)  Please see our Beekeeping Class 101 page for more information. - Thank You! /beekeeping-classes-losangeles/

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101: Class #4: Hive Management

Class #4 of the 2016 Season of LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 is Sunday, May 15, 9AM-Noon at Bill's Bees Bee Yard. Topics: Hive Management. BEE SUITS REQUIRED. Look forward to seeing you at BEE CLASS! All are Welcome! For location, directions and other information regarding the class, please refer to our Beekeeping Class 101 page: /beekeeping-classes-losangeles/

LACBA Meeting: Monday, April 4, 2016


Join us for the next meeting of the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association 
Date: Monday, April 4, 2016. Doors open: 6:45pm / Meeting Starts: 7:00pm Location: Mt. Olive Lutheran Church, 3561 Foothill Blvd., La Crescenta, CA 91214 Come, learn about bees! All are welcome!/meetings/

LACBA Meeting: March 7, 2016

Join us for the next meeting of the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association 
Date: Monday, March 7, 2016. Doors open: 6:45pm / Meeting Starts: 7:00pm Location: Mt. Olive Lutheran Church, 3561 Foothill Blvd., La Crescenta, CA 91214 Come, learn about bees! All are welcome! /meetings/

LACBA Meeting: Monday, February 1, 2016

MEETING REMINDER:
Monday, February 1, 2016
Time: Doors Open: 6:45pm/Starts: 7:00pm
Location:  Mount Olive Lutheran Church
                 3561 Foothill Boulevard
                 La Crescenta, CA 91214
                       (In Shilling Hall)
Come learn about bees - all are welcome!

For Info: /meetings/

 

Backyard Beekeeping Ordinance Passed By City Council

LA City Council   By Katherine Peterson  October 15, 2015

The Backyard Beekeeping Ordinance (CPC-2015-578-CA, Council File No. CF 12-0785) was unanimously adopted by the City Council yesterday, Wednesday, October 14, 2015. The Ordinance received 15 “Yes” votes and 0 “No” votes.  For more details or to review/download documents submitted to the City Clerk, including the City Planning Commission Staff Report and action, please refer to the online Council File at the following link:

Feel free to forward this information to anyone you feel might be interested. If you received this email via forwarded message from someone else, and you would like to receive updates directly from the Planning Department, please email katherine.peterson@lacity.org and ask to be added to the interest list. Please type “Add Me to Backyard Beekeeping Notification List” in the subject line and provide your group/organization/company affiliations and contact information (please include at least your zip code).

https://cityclerk.lacity.org/lacityclerkconnect/index.cfm?fa=ccfi.viewrecord&cfnumber=12-0785

What’s Next?

According to Section 250 of the City Charter, the Mayor has 10 days to act on the ordinance, meaning he can act on it on the same day, or 10 days later. Assuming the Mayor approves it, the City Clerk’s Office will then post the adopted Ordinance for a period of 10 days and a 30-day effective date will begin after that. Simply put, the earliest an Ordinance can realistically go into effect is 40 to 50 days after it is adopted by the City Council. When we have an effective date, we will notify the individuals on this interest list by email. 

Backyard Beekeeping OK'd By City of Los Angeles


“To bee or not to bee, that is the question. But there is no question. We must have bees,” Councilman Paul Koretz said, just before the council voted unanimously in favor of legalizing beekeeping in Los Angeles backyards.

Koretz said bees “do especially well in Los Angeles,” and today’s move could help address bee colony collapse disorder, which has claimed about a third of the global bee population.

Councilman Jose Huizar, who chairs a committee that advanced the ordinance, called the regulations “a great victory for bees, beekeepers and our environment.”

City leaders and members of HoneyLove, a nonprofit that promotes beekeeping, said the activity aids urban farming efforts such as community gardens. They also said urban areas offer a pesticide-free environment for insects that are critical to the health of agriculture and plants.

“Today’s vote was a long time in the making. We’ve been working on this for about four years now, and we are as excited and happy as we possibly could be,” said HoneyLove co-founder Rob McFarland.

The ordinance allows no more than one hive per 2,500 square feet per lot area to be kept in the backyards of single-family homes citywide. Front yard beekeeping is barred by the ordinance.

It also sets buffer zones and areas on a property where hives can be kept, and requires that beekeepers raise walls or hedges high enough to ensure bees need to fly up before leaving the backyard.

A water source also needs to be maintained near the hives so the bees would not need to venture outside of the beekeeper’s backyard to get hydrated, under the rules.

The backyard beekeepers also need to register with the County of Los Angeles Agricultural Commission.

The commission has 129 beekeepers registered with 219 locations countywide, according to commission spokesman Ken Pellman. Of those registered, 39 are commercial beekeepers, which means they have eight or more hives.

The Planning Department and the City Attorney’s Office drafted the proposed rules after the City Council ordered a study last February into ways to legalize backyard beekeeping. The move came in response to a campaign started in 2011 by residents of the Mar Vista community and supported by then- Councilman Bill Rosendahl.

Other council members in the past have voiced concerns that the bees could pose a danger to residents, with then-Councilman Bernard Parks referring to the National Geographic documentary “Attack of the Killer Bees,” about a dangerous variety of bees encroaching into the southern part of the United States.

Planning officials who consulted bee experts over the last year wrote in a recent city report that the variety of honey bees typically used in beekeeping are “non-aggressive” but may “sting in self-defense of their hive if it is approached.”

When the bees leave their hives to collect food -- potentially coming into contact with humans -- they “do not become defensive or aggressive or have reason to sting,” according to the report.

City officials also noted that Los Angeles already averages about eight to 10 feral bee hives per square mile.

The addition of backyard honey bees would not cause a shortage of bee food supply in the city thanks to the area’s steady climate, according to the bee experts consulted by planning officials. But if there were a shortage, the feral populations likely would leave the area to find alternative sources of food supply.

 

Backyard Beekeeping Approved In Los Angeles

NPR.org   By Laura Wagner   October 14, 2015

Beekeeper Rob McFarland (photographed last year) inspects the beehive he keeps on the roof of his Los Angeles house. The Los Angeles City Council voted unanimously on Wednesday to allow residents to keep beehives in their backyards. Damian Dovarganes/APOverturning a 136-year-old ban, the Los Angeles City Council voted on Wednesday to legalize urban beekeeping.

Once the ordinance is signed by the mayor, Los Angeles will join cities including New York, San Francisco and Washington in allowing beekeeping. There is even a beehive on the White House grounds.

The ordinance will limit beekeeping to backyards of single family homes and establish buffer zones, and beekeepers will have to provide a source of water at their hives,according to the Associated Press.

According to an op-ed in The Los Angeles Times by Noah Wilson-Rich, author of The Bee: A Natural History, the repeal of the beekeeping regulation is long overdue:

"On June 10, 1879, Los Angeles lawmakers banned beekeeping within city limits. According to Mark Vallianatos, who teaches environmental policy at Occidental College, their rationale was frankly preposterous. Having noted the affinity between bees and fruit trees, they reasoned that bees attacked and damaged fruit, and concluded that outlawing bees was the best way to preserve crops.

"Soon enough scientists debunked this ridiculous theory — bees are vitally important pollinators — and by 1917, the Los Angeles Times was calling the no-beekeeping policy 'an ancient and still-unrepealed city ordinance.'"

While critics worry about the dangers posed by bee stings, supporters point out that bees already live in the city in the wild. The AP adds, "Feral hives that are discovered in public areas usually are wiped out because of worries that they might contain Africanized bees — hybrids of tamer European honeybees and a hardier but more aggressive strain."

In the op-ed, Wilson-Rich counters this claim:

"Hives maintained by beekeepers are less dangerous than wild hives; beekeepers effectively tame hives through re-queening — the process of removing an aggressive queen and manually adding a docile queen."

The vote is welcome news to scientists who warn that declining bee populations, due to such factors as climate change and loss of habitat, will damage crop yields, as NPR's Allison Aubrey reported in April.

"Even if you're not a lover of bees or honey, you should know that bees are critically important to our food supply. They help pollinate billions of dollars of crops each year, from apples and carrots to blueberries and almonds."

So if bees are threatened, ultimately, the production of these crops will be threatened, too."

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/10/14/448725988/backyard-beekeping-approved-in-los-angeles