LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 - #6: July 15, 2018, 9AM-Noon, at The Valley Hive

The next Beekeeping Class 101 will be held Sunday, July 15, 2018, 9AM-Noon, at The Valley Hive apiary location: 9633 Baden Avenue, Chatsworth. Bee Suits Required for this class

 

MEET AT OUR BEE YARD AT 9633 BADEN AVENUE.
Please be prompt - class is this Sunday at 9am.  
Please respect our neighbors.
We are guests on this property, and we are a very large group. 
Limited parking is available inside the gate and also on Baden Avenue.
The bee yard is located off a dirt road; a short walk up a hill from the parking lot. 

PROPER ATTIRE IS A MUST!
Full suit with veil and gloves are required to attend class.
Closed shoes/boots are required.
Bring bottled water.
Bring your own labeled tools, smoker, and smoker fuel  for a chance to receive more hands-on learning opportunities.

NEED SUPPLIES? Our store is located at 10538 Topanga Cyn, and it will open at 8am in case you need to purchase any last minute supplies.

REFRESHMENTS!
You are invited back to our Topanga location for refreshments and will have an opportunity to ask any questions you may have regarding your personal hive. 

If you have any last minute questions or concerns, you can contact The Valley Hive at (818) 280-6500 or via email at info@thevalleyhive.com. 

See you in class!
The Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association
The Valley Hive

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 - #2: March 18, 2018, 9AM-Noon, at The Valley Hive

The Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association Beekeeping Class 101 - Class #2 is Sunday, March 18, 2018 from 9:00AM-Noon, at The Valley Hive location: 10538 Topanga Canyon, Chatsworth, CA. The location for the rest of the classes TBD. You can register at the class.

The topics for this Sunday's class are: box building and how to install a package.

If the event is cancelled this Sunday due to rain, we will let you know on this website and our LACBA Facebook pageThe Valley Hive will also send an email to those on the customer list and they will make an announcement on social media as well (The Valley Hive Facebook page).

All the information you need in order to attend the LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 is posted on our website: /beekeeping-classes-losangeles/.

Beekeeping Class 101 is the entire session of beekeeping classes:
 from February through October 2018 (No class in September). We suggest you begin in February and continue through all the classes.  You are welcome to come in the middle of the season of classes, but  you will have missed out on valuable information.

Get there early so you can find a place to park. Bring a chair, and paper and pencil for taking notes.

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101: Class #6, Saturday, July 8, 2017, 9am-Noon

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 (Class #6) Saturday, July 8, 2017, 9am-noon
BEE SUIT REQUIRED FOR THIS CLASS.

 THE VALLEY HIVE
9633 BADEN AVENUE
CHATSWORTH, CA 93063
(818) 280-6500

BRING A FOLDING CHAIR. Seating is limited.

For directions and day of class updates contact: The Valley Hive

Click here for more information about our
Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association
Beekeeping Class 101
.

TOPIC: Finding and treating for mites, pros and cons of treatments, and when to treat.

Note from The Valley Hive: Even though The Valley Hive has moved to a new location, LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 will continue at 9633 Baden Avenue from 9-12pm. Our new shop at 10538 Topanga Canyon Blvd will open at 8am on Saturday if anyone needs to purchase a suit or other beekeeping equipment. Suits are required. We will be working inside the hive, so if you have beekeeping tools – smoker, hive tool, bee brush – please bring them to class, along with smoker fuel and a lighter.

Calling all LACBA experienced beekeepers - The Valley Hive could use your help with bee class this year. Thank you!

LACBA Beekeeping Class #5: June 10, 2017, 9-Noon

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 (Class #5) Saturday, June 10, 2017, 9am-noon
BEE SUIT REQUIRED FOR THIS CLASS.

 THE VALLEY HIVE
9633 BADEN AVENUE
CHATSWORTH, CA 93063
(818) 280-6500

BRING A FOLDING CHAIR. Seating is limited.

info@thevalleyhive.com
Map: 
http://www.thevalleyhive.com/contacts/

https://www.facebook.com/events/109590989583958/?ti=icl

TOPIC:  Pest Management - How to check for pests and how to deal with them.

Note from The Valley Hive: Even though The Valley Hive has moved to a new location, Beekeeping 101 will continue at 9633 Baden Avenue from 9-12pm. Our new shop at 10538 Topanga Canyon Blvd will open at 8am on Saturday if anyone needs to purchase a suit or other beekeeping equipment. Suits are required. We will be continuing hive inspections. If you have beekeeping tools – smoker, hive tool, bee brush – please bring them to class, along with smoker fuel and a lighter.

Calling all LACBA experienced beekeepers - The Valley Hive could use your help with bee class this year. Thank you!

Beekeeping Class 101 - Class #6: Honey Extracting and More About Bees

Next Beekeeping Class 101 is Sunday, August 21, 2016, 9AM-Noon at Bill's Bees Bee Yard. BEE SUITS REQUIRED. We may do some honey extracting during this class. If you have honey frames to extract, let Bill Lewis know in advance and we will arrange to extract YOUR HONEY as part of our bee class. Send Bill an email at billsbees@wildblue.net or call 818-312-1691 to get on the bee class extracting schedule. We can provide a bucket for extracted honey or bring your own. Look forward to seeing you. For more info on our Beekeeping Class 101 go to: /beekeeping-classes-losangeles

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 - #6: July 17, 2016 at Bill's Bees Bee Yard

Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association
Beekeeping Class 101 - Class #5 

Welcome to the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association Beekeeping Class 101.
See /beekeeping-classes-losangeles/ 
for the 2016 Season Schedule of Classes.
All bee classes for the remainder of the 2016 Season will be held at Bill's Bees Bee Yard.
Map: http://goo.gl/maps/Hz7NS.
The next class is Sunday, July 17, 9AM-Noon.
BEE SUITS REQUIRED!
We teach responsible beekeeping for an urban environment,
adhering to Best Management Practices for the bees, beekeepers, and general public.
All are Welcome! 

Beekeeping Class 101 - Class #4: Hive Management

Get ready for Class #4! Join us Sunday, May 15th (9am-noon) at Bill's Bees Bee Yard for Class #4 of the 2016 Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association Beekeeping Class 101 series (Bee Suits Required). 

In this hand’s on beekeeping class you’re going to learn about hive management and what to look for to see how your bees are doing: 

  • Is my queen healthy? Or, am I queenless? 
  • Is there brood? Or, do I need to replace my queen?
  • Is there food? Or, do I need to feed my bees? What? When? How?
  • Are there Varroa mites? And if so, what do I do? 

For those of you who attended Class #3, we took our first peek inside the hive and had a look around: 

We learned to approach a bee hive from the side, slowly and with care, and that it’s not a good idea to stand in front of the hive, blocking the entrance. Foragers, packed with nectar and pollen, were anxious to get in. 

A few puffs of smoke from the smoker helped calm the bees before we opened the top cover. Once the cover was removed, we began our inspection inside the hive. As we removed the frames we leaned them against the side of the box. We worked from the outside frames first then moved toward the inside. While carefully removing the frames, we looked for the queen. She's larger and moves quicker than the worker bees and is usually going from cell to cell laying eggs. We finally found the queen surrounded by her 'court,' healthy and happy, and busy laying eggs.  

We saw where the worker bees had started building wax on new frames and were forming the wax into cells. Honey bee cells are the same size all over the world. Worker bee cells are the smallest cells, flat topped, capped with wax. This is called capped brood. Drone cells are bigger, taller, with a dome top. Queen cells are large, peanut shape and texture.

We learned that a beehive consists of three types of bees: Females: 1 Queen, Thousands of Worker Bees. Males: Drones. These three types of individual bees make up the collective hive which is an organization in itself. 

It was an amazing first look inside a bee hive; lot's of oooh's and aaah's, and finger's pointing: What's this? What's that? What are they doing?

Now, in Class #4, we’re going to go more in depth, and learn to recognize the signs of a healthy or troubled hive:

First, we’re going to find the queen and determine if she’s still laying eggs. If she’s not laying, she may be a dud, and we might need to replace her. And, how do we replace a queen?

Then, we’ll look for eggs and see if the larvae have been fed royal jelly. Worker bees feed royal jelly (a milky white substance) to larvae for the first three days. After three days, the worker bees feed the larvae pollen (bee bread). They will continue to feed pollen to the larvae until the larvae is capped off; usually around the 14th or 15th day. Worker bees emerge about 21 days after the egg is laid, drones 24 days, and a queen will emerge about 16 days after the egg is laid. We’re going to learn to identify the differing stages of larvae, locate the capped brood, and learn what the brood pattern reveals to us about the health of the brood and the hive. We'll also learn to tell the difference between capped brood and capped honey.

We'll cover what bees eat:

  • Why do bees need pollen: It is their protein. If bees are not bringing in enough pollen, you’ll learn to determine if you need to feed them a pollen substitute.
  • Why do bees need nectar: It is their carbohydrates. If the bees are not bringing in enough nectar, you may need to feed them sugar syrup. You'll learn how.

We’ll talk about Varroa mites. They seem to be out way too early this season. We’ll discuss various ways of testing for mites and what to do if your bees are infested.

Now, if you really want to get excited and get a jump on identifying the stages of larvae, check out this amazing time lapse video from National Geographic. Honeybee Metamorphosis: From tiny eggs to quivering pupae to hair-sprouting adults, worker honeybees develop at lightning speed thanks to a time-lapse video of 2,500 images. http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/magazine/150415-ngm-bees-more.

With good mentoring, monitoring, and continued learning of beekeeping skills, your bees are off to a good start. Enjoy!

Happy Bee-ing! 
Bill & Clyde 
Bill’s Bees

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101: Class #4: Hive Management

Class #4 of the 2016 Season of LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 is Sunday, May 15, 9AM-Noon at Bill's Bees Bee Yard. Topics: Hive Management. BEE SUITS REQUIRED. Look forward to seeing you at BEE CLASS! All are Welcome! For location, directions and other information regarding the class, please refer to our Beekeeping Class 101 page: /beekeeping-classes-losangeles/

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 Begins Sunday, February 21, 9AM-Noon, at Bill's Bees Bee Yard

JOIN US for the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association 
Beekeeping Class 101 ~ 1st Class February 21 ~ Hosted at Bill’s Bees Bee Farm

Whether you are new to beekeeping, aspire to being a backyard
beekeeper, or are already an experienced beekeeper who would like
to continue learning about bees and beekeeping,
we’d like to invite you to attend the 
Los Angeles  County Beekeepers Association 2016 Season of Beekeeping Classes 101.
 
We teach responsible beekeeping for an urban environment,
adhering to Best Management Practices for the bees,
beekeepers, and the general public.
All are Welcome!

DATE: First Class is Sunday, February 21 ~ TIME: 9am-Noon

Bill’s Bees Bee Farm
12640 Little Tujunga Canyon Rd, Lake View Terrace, CA 91342
http://billsbees.com/
Map to Bill's Bees Bee Yard: http://goo.gl/maps/Hz7NS

Beekeeping Class 101 is FREE to LACBA members. 
Membership $10/year per household. 
Non-members: $10/per class/per person. 
Bee suits not required for the first class.

 For the 2016 Schedule, Locations, Directions and other Information see: 
/beekeeping-classes-losangeles/

See you in the morning on the top of the mountain!
You may want to bring a bottle of water, a sun hat, and a pad and pencil for notes.
Try to arrive early. It's going to bee a great day!!! 

 /
https://www.facebook.com/losangelesbeekeeping/