Celebrate National Honey Bee Day at The Valley Hive Honey Competition & Recipe Contest

Celebrate National Honeybee Day
The Valley Hive's 4th Annual
HONEY COMPETITION AND RECIPE CONTEST
Sunday, August 18th from 4pm to 7pm
10538 Topanga Cyn Blvd in Chatsworth!

It's the perfect venue for celebrating NATIONAL HONEYBEE DAY.

Come on out to taste backyard honey and delectable recipes made with honey.  Meet local vendors.  Drink honey cocktails.  Learn how to make mead and how to cook with honey.  There will be kids activities. As well as a belly dance performance.

Got honey? Join dozens of other local beekeepers and show off your prize honey by entering our Honey Competition.  Submit 2 - 8oz jars of honey (1 labeled & 1 unlabeled) by Friday August 16th.

Not a beekeeper? Enter a favorite recipe that uses honey. From sweet to savory, give us your best dish!  Entries must be received by 3pm on Sunday August 18th.  Bring 3 servings for the Judges and more for the crowd to try at the event.

This event has always been held as a Fundraiser for honeybees, and this year is no different. 
This year, all donations received from this event will go to Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association.

honey competition winners 2018.jpg

Cottage Food Operation Information

August 13, 2019
Jaime Garza, County of San Diego | Department of Agriculture, Weights and Measures Apiary/Agricultural Standards Inspector

Dear Beekeeper, 

Please find some helpful links that explain the following information on Cottage Food Operations which allows individuals to prepare and/or package certain non-potentially hazardous foods in private-home kitchens referred to as "cottage food operations" (CFOs): 

 *Honey label has specific requirements in the California Food & Ag Code as well. 

All honey containers must have the following labeling:  

  1. Identity: common product name “Honey” you can also choose to include floral or blossom source of honey in addition to product name Honey

  2. Responsibility: name and address of producer or distributor

  3. Quantity: Net weight of honey should be in pounds or ounces AND grams and follow standard honey container weights found in FAC 29502https://codes.findlaw.com/ca/food-and-agricultural-code-formerly-agricultural-code/fac-sect-29502.html

  4. US Grade: see USDA Standards for Grades of Extracted Honey manual TABLE IV and TABLE V https://www.ams.usda.gov/sites/default/files/media/Extracted_Honey_Standard%5B1%5D.pdf

  5. Color: only if honey is packed in opaque container – see USDA Grades of Extracted Honey manual TABLE I – color designations 

 Here are some helpful links to help you better understand honey labeling: 

California Food & Agricultural Code FAC 29611 (Honey container labeling) https://codes.findlaw.com/ca/food-and-agricultural-code-formerly-agricultural-code/fac-sect-29611.html  

California Food & Agricultural Code FA 29502 (Standard honey container weight) https://codes.findlaw.com/ca/food-and-agricultural-code-formerly-agricultural-code/fac-sect-29502.html

National Honey Board honey labeling information https://www.honey.com/honey-industry/regulation/honey-labeling

USDA Standards for Grades of Extracted Honey Manual https://www.ams.usda.gov/sites/default/files/media/Extracted_Honey_Standard%5B1%5D.pdf 

Please let me know if you have any questions. 

Respectfully,
Jaime Garza, County of San Diego | Department of Agriculture, Weights and Measures | Apiary/Agricultural Standards Inspector, Phone: 858-614-7738 | Email: jaime.garza@sdcounty.ca.gov | Website: www.sdcountybees.org

Celebrate National Honey Bee Day at The Valley Hive Honey Competition & Recipe Contest

Celebrate National Honeybee Day
The Valley Hive's 4th Annual
HONEY COMPETITION AND RECIPE CONTEST
Sunday, August 18th from 4pm to 7pm
10538 Topanga Cyn Blvd in Chatsworth!

It's the perfect venue for celebrating NATIONAL HONEYBEE DAY.

Come on out to taste backyard honey and delectable recipes made with honey.  Meet local vendors.  Drink honey cocktails.  Learn how to make mead and how to cook with honey.  There will be kids activities. As well as a belly dance performance.

Got honey? Join dozens of other local beekeepers and show off your prize honey by entering our Honey Competition.  Submit 2 - 8oz jars of honey (1 labeled & 1 unlabeled) by Friday August 16th.

Not a beekeeper? Enter a favorite recipe that uses honey. From sweet to savory, give us your best dish!  Entries must be received by 3pm on Sunday August 18th.  Bring 3 servings for the Judges and more for the crowd to try at the event.

This event has always been held as a Fundraiser for honeybees, and this year is no different. 
This year, all donations received from this event will go to Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association.

honey competition winners 2018.jpg

Celebrate National Honey Bee Day at The Valley Hive Honey Competition & Recipe Contest

Celebrate National Honeybee Day
The Valley Hive's 4th Annual
HONEY COMPETITION AND RECIPE CONTEST
Sunday, August 18th from 4pm to 7pm
10538 Topanga Cyn Blvd in Chatsworth!


It's the perfect venue for celebrating NATIONAL HONEYBEE DAY.

Come on out to taste backyard honey and delectable recipes made with honey.  Meet local vendors.  Drink honey cocktails.  Learn how to make mead and how to cook with honey.  There will be kids activities. As well as a belly dance performance.

Got honey? Join dozens of other local beekeepers and show off your prize honey by entering our Honey Competition.  Submit 2 - 8oz jars of honey (1 labeled & 1 unlabeled) by Friday August 16th.

Not a beekeeper? Enter a favorite recipe that uses honey. From sweet to savory, give us your best dish!  Entries must be received by 3pm on Sunday August 18th.  Bring 3 servings for the Judges and more for the crowd to try at the event.

This event has always been held as a Fundraiser for honeybees, and this year is no different. 
This year, all donations received from this event will go to Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association.

honey competition winners 2018.jpg

Pesticides Deliver a One-Two Punch to Honey Bees

Phys.Org By Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry August 5, 2019

Researchers conduct semi-field experiments on honey bees. Credit: Lang Chen

Researchers conduct semi-field experiments on honey bees. Credit: Lang Chen

Adjuvants are chemicals that are commonly added to plant protection products, such as pesticides, to help them spread, adhere to targets, disperse appropriately, or prevent drift, among other things. There was a widespread assumption that these additives would not cause a biological reaction after exposure, but a number of recent studies show that adjuvants can be toxic to ecosystems, and specific to this study, honey bees.

Jinzhen Zhang and colleagues studied the effects on honey bees when adjuvants were co-applied at "normal concentration levels" with neonicotinoids. Their research, recently published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, found that the mixture of the pesticide and the adjuvant increased the mortality rate of honey bees in the lab and in semi-field conditions, where it also reduced colony size and brooding.

When applied alone, the three pesticide adjuvants caused no significant, immediate toxicity to honeybees. However, when the pesticide acetamiprid was mixed with adjuvants and applied to honeybees in the laboratory, the toxicity was quite significant and immediate. In groups treated with combined pesticide-adjuvant concentrates, mortality was significantly higher than the control groups, which included a blank control (no pesticide, no adjuvant, only water) and a control with only pesticide (no adjuvant). Further, flight intensity, colony intensity and pupae development continued to deteriorate long after the application comparative to the control groups.

Zhang noted that this study, "contributed to the understanding of the complex relationships between the composition of pesticide formulations and bee harm," and stressed that "further research is required on the environmental safety assessment of adjuvants and their interactions with active ingredients on non-target species."

https://phys.org/news/2019-08-pesticides-one-two-honey-bees.html

Empty Calories

Bee Informed.jpg

By Dan Wyns July 2, 2019

Foragers gathering fresh sawdust. Photo: Mike Connor

Foragers gathering fresh sawdust. Photo: Mike Connor

Somewhere early on in a “Beekeeping 101” class you’ll learn that honey bees forage for 4 things: nectar, pollen, propolis, and water. The nectar and pollen become honey and bee bread to provide sustenance. Propolis is used as a structural component and also contributes to colony health through immunological activity. Previous blog posts about propolis here and here provide more information. Water is necessary for a variety of purposes including preparation of brood food and evaporative cooling. So in addition to water, bees need 3 substances produced by plants. But do they collect anything else? Of course they do. If you’ve ever seen open syrup feeding, it’s apparent that the bees will forego the flower visitation part of foraging when a sweet liquid is provided. Bees will also readily gather pollen substitute when bulk fed in powder form. While these nectar and pollen surrogates may not be as attractive or nutritious as the genuine articles they are intended to replicate, they can be important in getting colonies through lean times.

Flowers and their surrogates are what the bees should be getting into, but what are they actually getting into? Some beekeepers have a perception that if bees gather it they must need it, but in my time working in and around bees I’ve seen them get into a lot of different things that probably aren’t great for them. One summer we noticed a propolis traps in a yard were yielding a dark brown, almost black propolis with sharp plastic smell instead of the typical red/orange sweet smelling propolis for the area. When we  sat waiting for the construction worker with the Stop/Go sign to allow us through the roadworks where a new topcoat of asphalt was being applied, we noticed bees collecting road tar to use as propolis. This paper detected petroleum derived molecules that matched the chemistry of local asphalt in propolis from urban colonies, confirming that bees will gather sticky stuff other than plant resins. I’ve also seen bees appearing to collect silicon-based caulking product. I’ve often described the physical role of propolis in the colony as bee-glue or caulking, so seeing one bee resort to gathering our version shouldn’t come as a shock if actual resins aren’t available. Bees gather “real” propolis from a variety of botanical sources depending on geography and climate. Some of the most common propolis sources in temperate climates are members of the genus Populus which includes poplars, aspens, and cottonwoods. For more about the role of propolis in the colony and an overview of botanical sources around the world, check out this article.

It’s not just propolis collection where bees make mistakes, sometimes they get it wrong when seeking pollen too. While building woodware in the shop, I’ve seen bees take a lot of interest in the sawdust from both treated and untreated lumber. I’ve never actually seen a forager pack it onto her corbicula, but beekeepers report bees gathering a variety of powdery materials when pollen is scarce. An early study on pollen foraging noted this tendency,  “During periods of pollen scarcity bees are reported to seek substitutes, such as bran, sawdust, and coal dust, which are of no known value for brood rearing.

Just about any sweet liquid is going to get the attention of honey bees, and I’ve seen them investigate many kinds of sodas and juices. This tendency may be a little unnerving to picnickers, but it isn’t really a problem unless there is a more permanent stationary source of sugary liquid that the bees find. One such case happened when some urban bees in NYC found a bit of runoff syrup from a maraschino cherry factory which was only the beginning of the story.

https://beeinformed.org/2019/07/02/empty-calories/