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LA COUNTY FAIR - BEE BOOTH


Welcome to the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association!

For over 130 years the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association has been serving the Los Angeles Beekeeping Community. Our group membership is composed of commercial and small scale beekeepers, bee hobbyists, and bee enthusiasts. So whether you came upon our site by design or just 'happened' to find us - welcome! Our primary purpose is the care and welfare of the honeybee. We achieve this through education of ourselves and the general public, supporting honeybee research, and practicing responsible beekeeping in an urban environment. 
 

"The bee is more honored than other animals, not because she labors, but because she labors for others."        Saint John Chrysostom

Next LACBA Meeting:  Monday, January 5, 2015. Open: 6:45P.M./Start: 7:00P.M.  All are welcome!
There will not be a meeting in December. We will be celebrating the holidays with our Annual Holiday Dinner on Monday, December 1, at Pickwick Gardens in Burbank, CA. See the Events page for details. 

Beekeeping Class 101:  Our 2014 Beekeeping Class 101 has ended for the season. Check back in January of next year for information on the 2015 Beekeeping Class 101. 

 Find us on Facebook and LIKE us. https://www.facebook.com/losangelesbeekeeping 

THE LATEST BUZZ:  

Monday
Dec222014

Walt McBride

December 22, 2014

It is with deep sorrow and a heavy heart we inform you that longtime beekeeper and Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association member, Walt McBride, passed away this morning.  When we have more information, we will let you know.

Walt is so loved and will be missed. May we see his spirit in the spring as the honeybees swarm.  

"Every saint has a bee in his halo." -Elbert Hubbard

Wednesday
Dec172014

Kids 'n Bees: Kids and Bees and Disneyland

Bee Girl   From Sarah Red-Laird  December 17, 2014

The "Kids and Bees" event is right around the corner, and I am hoping you can help me with a couple of things? 
  • We need volunteers to help on the day of the event.  Duties consist of managing activity table to help kids with activities such as beeswax candle rolling, microscopes, almond shelling, face painting, honey tasting etc.
  • We need to get the word out about the event to local kids (Classrooms, homeschool groups, 4-H'ers, Girl and Boy Scouts, etc.).  
Exciting news!  Bee Girl and the American Beekeeping Federation are coming to the Disneyland Resort, for the annual North American Conference and Tradeshow January 6th-10th.  From 9:00 am till noon on the morning of Friday the 9th we are hosting a"Kids and Bees" event to engage the local community.  
For registering as a volunteer, or a student group - please contact me at sarah@beegirl.org or 541-708-1127.  Thank you!! 
  
This no-cost event has been a tradition with the ABF conference for over 20 years, and is a "don't miss" opportunity for school groups, home schooled kids, scouts, and clubs. Kids and their teachers or parents can expect a room full of hands-on activities under the themes of, “The Art of Beekeeping,”  “The Science of Beekeeping,” “The World of Beekeeping,” and “The Future of Bees: It’s Up to You!”  Favorites such as beeswax candle rolling, bee finger puppet making, and hive displays will be there.  The highlights this year will be face painting, a photo booth with costumes, and an ultraviolet “Bee View” demonstration.  Students will make their way through each station, engaging with beekeepers and Honey Queens from around the US, and activities that will harness their senses and imaginations.  

Click this link for a video by the LA Farm Bureau of a similar program from earlier this year in New Orleans!

See the Press Release for more information.  
 
And for more information, join our Facebook event page, or to register your children or students for the January 9th free program, please contact Sarah Red-Laird at sarah@beegirl.org or 541-708-1127.   
 
Please share this information with your community asap, space is limited - but it's our goal to bring as many students as we can to learn about our bees!
 
Sarah Red-Laird
Bee Girl, Executive Director
American Beekeeping Federation, Kids and Bees Program Director
International Bee Research Association, Bee World Program US Ambassador 

"Beekeeping Education // Honey Bee Conservation" 
Wednesday
Dec172014

Guelph Scientists One Step Closer to Inhibiting Destructive Bee Disease

The Globe and Mail    By Eric Atkins  December 16, 2014

The honeybees responsible for pollinating one-third of the food we eat face a host of threats, from bloodsucking mites and viruses to pesticides and climate change.

But researchers at the University of Guelph have taken a big step toward fighting the most destructive and widespread killer of honeybee larvae, a disease known as American foulbrood.

For the first time, scientists have identified a toxin released by the pathogen, and come up with a drug that could stop the disease that is prevalent in North America, Europe and other parts of the world.

“What we’ve found is an important factor that we can inhibit in this honeybee disease,” said Rod Merrill, a Guelph biochemist and co-author of the study to be published in the December issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

American foulbrood, named for the smell of infected hives and the country in which it was first identified more than a century ago, is spread easily among honeybee colonies by spores carried by adult bees. The spores are eaten by larvae, which die but also spread millions more spores into the hive.

“The next generation is kaput. It’s not toxic to the adults, but that ultimately destroys the hive,” Prof. Merrill said in an interview. “And then what happens is robber bees go into the hive and steal the honey, which is contaminated with the bacterial spores, and then they drag it over to their hive, so it just proliferates.”

Hives infected with the bacteria quickly fail, and beekeepers must burn the hive and all associated equipment to ensure the spores are destroyed.

There is no cure for American foulbrood. Antibiotics used to control the disease have proven ineffective as resistant strains have developed.

Field tests to be conducted on hives in the spring will show whether the drug is effective at controlling American foulbrood, said Prof. Merrill, who began the research more than two years ago.

The drug that could treat the disease is not an antibiotic, but an anti-virulence compound that controls the toxin that kills the larvae but does not prompt the bacteria to mutate by threatening their survival.

“Research takes a long time. So right at this moment I can’t say what the impact will be in treating American foulbrood,” Prof. Merrill said. “However, I can say it’s going in the right direction that we need to characterize the toxins produced by the organism that causes American foulbrood or the impending crisis for the honeybee is going to get worse.”

Long winters, virus-bearing varroa mites and pesticide exposure have contributed to declines in honeybee populations in North America and Europe. In Ontario, declining honey production and mounting costs of replacing dead bees have been blamed in part on neonicotinoid pesticides that are used to grow corn and soybeans.

In response, the Ontario government recently said it plans to impose rules that would reduce the use of the systemic pesticide by 80 per cent by 2017. Farmers who plant seeds treated with neonics would have to show their fields are susceptible to grubs, worms and other yield-destroying pests.

The move is opposed by the chemical companies that sell the pesticide-treated seeds and the Grain Farmers of Ontario, which says the restrictions will take away an important tool farmers use to protect their harvests.

A new poll of 1,000 Ontarians shows nearly 80 per cent support the provincial government’s plans to restrict the use of neonics, which scientists say impair bees’ foraging abilities and contribute to colony failure.

The poll, released by the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment, Friends of the Earth Canada and the Ontario Beekeepers’ Association, found support for the restrictions was strongest (85 per cent) in Southwestern Ontario, the heart of Canada’s corn-and-soybean region. Support was weakest, 60 per cent, in the central part of the province.

“Our food security depends on healthy pollinators,” said Gideon Forman of the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment. “Ontarians are aware of the current crisis and want the government to take action to protect bees.”

Read at:  http://www.theglobeandmail.com/technology/science/scientists-in-guelph-come-one-step-closer-to-saving-the-bees/article22098146/

Tuesday
Dec162014

Legalization Update: Beekeeping in City of Los Angeles

LEGALIZATION UPDATE:

The City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning is in the process of preparing an ordinance to allow beekeeping on single-family zone lots, with a draft ordinance expected before City Planning Commission in the spring of 2015. This ordinance draft is in response to a City Council Motion directing our Department and Animal Services to report back on the feasibility of beekeeping in residential neighborhoods.

Preliminary Outreach Meeting
Saturday, January 10, 2015 | 10:00 a.m.
Hollenbeck Police Station
2111 E. 1st St., Los Angeles, CA
(street parking available, transit options are available, entrance at the front of the police station)

HoneyLove Event post: https://www.facebook.com/events/844746942253551/?ref_newsfeed_story_type=regular

Monday
Dec152014

How To Make Honey-Lemon Throat Lozenges: The Perfect Remedy for Cough, Throat & Mouth Health

Living Traditionally  By Dr. Payam Hakimi, D.O.   December 9, 2014

Instead of buying conventional cough drops that are loaded with artificial flavors and toxic substances, you can make some of your own. These cough drops are  extremely easy to make, and can also be customized to reflect personal tastes and preferences. I love adding essential oils to my natural remedies. They work with your body’s chemistry to  help build up your immune system and help fight the bacteria & viruses causing your symptoms.

Peppermint essential oil contains the volatile oil menthol which helps soothe the bronchial and help eases sore throats.  It also has antibacterial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, insecticidal, antispasmodic and carminative properties.

Ingredients

  • 5 ounces raw honey
  • About 2 tablespoons water
  • 5 drops peppermint essential oil (where to find)
  • Zest of one lemon

Instructions:

1. Combine  honey, and water in a  small saucepan. Heat over a low flame  and bring the mixture to a boil.

2. Cover for 4 minutes.

3. Remove from heat and let cool for five minutes.

4. Stir in lemon zest and peppermint essential oil.

5. Use a teaspoon to drop small amounts of the mixture onto the cookie sheet making sure to leave some space between them, because they’ll spread.

6. Allow it to harden. This will take approximately 30 minutes.

7. Let cool for 1/2 hour and store in an air-tight container. Keeps for 3-6 months in dry conditions.

Read at: http://livingtraditionally.com/make-honey-lemon-throat-lozenges-perfect-remedy-cough-throat-mouth-health/