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This is the official website for the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association established in 1873.

 

Bare Bees:
kevin.heydman@gmail.com
Bill's Bees
Holly Hawk 626-807-0572
The Valley Hive 

LA COUNTY FAIR - BEE BOOTH


Welcome to the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association!

For over 130 years the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association has been serving the Los Angeles Beekeeping Community. Our group membership is composed of commercial and small scale beekeepers, bee hobbyists, and bee enthusiasts. So whether you came upon our site by design or just 'happened' to find us - welcome! Our primary purpose is the care and welfare of the honeybee. We achieve this through education of ourselves and the general public, supporting honeybee research, and practicing responsible beekeeping in an urban environment. 

"The bee is more honored than other animals, not because she labors, but because she labors for others."  Saint John Chrysostom 



Next LACBA Meeting:
Monday, August 6, 2018. General Meeting: 7PM. Open Board Meeting: 6:30PM.  

Next LACBA Beekeeping Class 101:
Sunday, July 15, 2018, 9AM-Noon at The Valley Hive. BEE SUITS REQUIRED!

Check out our Facebook page for lots of info and updates on bees; and please remember to LIKE US: https://www.facebook.com/losangelesbeekeeping 

THE LATEST BUZZ:  

Saturday
Jul142018

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 - #6: July 15, 2018, 9AM-Noon, at The Valley Hive

UPDATE: From The Valley Hive, Saturday, 7/14/18, 12:09AM

The next Beekeeping Class 101 will be held Sunday, July 15, 2018, 9AM-Noon, at The Valley Hive apiary location: 9633 Baden Avenue, Chatsworth. Bee Suits Required for this class.

TOPIC: VARROA MITE PART II

Last month we tested for varroa mites in the bee yard. Hopefully, many of you have had the chance to perform a varroa mite test on your own hives. We look forward to having you share your experience and hearing about the results.

This month we will be discussing the various types of treatments available to control this pesky pest! 

Are you an experienced beekeeper? We welcome your help and are always happy to have volunteers.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION:

MEET AT OUR BEE YARD AT 9633 BADEN AVENUE.

Please be prompt - class is this Sunday at 9am.  

Please respect our neighbors. We are guests on this property, and we are a very large group. 

Limited parking is available inside the gate and also on Baden Avenue.

The bee yard is located off a dirt road; a short walk up a hill from the parking lot. 

PROPER ATTIRE IS A MUST!

Full suit with veil and gloves are required to attend class.

Closed shoes/boots are required.

Bring bottled water. It is HOT!!

Bring your own labeled tools, smoker, and smoker fuel  for a chance to receive more hands-on learning opportunities.

NEED SUPPLIES:

Our store, located at 10538 Topanga Cyn Blvd, will open at 8am on Sunday.

REFRESHMENTS:

We will meet back at our Topanga location for refreshments after class, where you will have the opportunity to ask your beekeeping questions.

If you have any last minute questions or concerns, you can contact The Valley Hive at (818) 280-6500 or via email at info@thevalleyhive.com

See you in class!
The Valley Hive

Friday
Jul132018

New Technology Makes Commercial Beekeeping More Efficient, Profitable

 CATCH THE BUZZ     July 13, 2018

In an effort to provide beekeepers with a more effective and comprehensive management system, two Healthy Hives 2020 grant recipients recently announced a new collaboration that could help transform commercial beekeeping practices by using Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) technology, combined with web and mobile apps, to track and manage honey bee colonies.

Hive Tracks, an apiary management software provider, and its chief executive officer, James Wilkes, PhD., have been an integral part of the Healthy Hives 2020 research conducted by Joseph Cazier, PhD., professor and director of the Center for Analytics Research and Education at Appalachian State University. Both Cazier and Brandon Hopkins, PhD., assistant research professor in the Department of Entomology at Washington State University, received research grants in 2016 that focused on how to improve management practices for commercial beekeepers.

To view a current KIM&JIM Show webinar produced in June, 2018, about this program featuring Dr. Hopkins, click on the link below or paste it into your browser –

https://register.gotowebinar.com/recording/recordingView?webinarKey=1843148016502893057&registrantEmail=Kim%40beeculture.com

“There are currently not a lot of management tools for commercial beekeepers. Many of them are still managing their operations with notebooks, pencil and paper, or trying to keep track of treatments and issues with objects like thumb tacks, cattle ear tags and wax pencils,” said Hopkins. “For our project, we’ve been developing a way to transform those systems into digital information that can be gathered without adding additional work or time in the field.”

By using RFID technology, that information can be analyzed to inform best practices in commercial beekeeping. Beekeepers can then use those practices to develop decision support tools that can provide timely data on their hives, ultimately decreasing losses.

But to do this, Hopkins needed to be able to collect the data. This led him to research RFID technology, which he eventually implemented with individual hives. RFID tags are used in a wide range of industries, from retail stores tracking inventory to airlines tracking baggage. Hopkins’ team began placing the tags on individual hives and worked with a software development company to create a platform that would enable beekeepers to monitor their hives for such basic beekeeping management duties as when and where the hives were checked, as well as the location of each hive.

While Hopkins was developing his RFID technology, Cazier, Wilkes and the Hive Tracks team were using their Healthy Hives 2020 grant to put the finishing touches on the second version of its innovative Hive Tracks Apiary Management System.

“Many of the major concerns of a commercial beekeeper involve the day-to-day management of the hives in an operation,” said Wilkes. “They want to know, ‘Where are my hives? How many hives do I have, and what are their conditions? Who was the last person to touch them, and what did they do?”

According to Wilkes, Hive Tracks began as a software system for hobbyists and sideliners. “However, we knew there was a huge gap in technology that could benefit commercial beekeepers,” said Wilkes. “We recognized the challenge of adopting new technology within the commercial beekeeping space, so the system had to be simple to use, and our software system provides a framework that can evolve from a super simple foundation to more complex hive level data.”

That’s where Hopkins’ research came in. “Our system is designed to focus on the bee yard level to make it accessible for adoption by commercial beekeepers,” said Wilkes. “But RFID enables you to include the hive level and opens the door for a wide range of additional information that all of us believe is important, but is often difficult to collect.”

Both Hopkins and Hive Tracks were exhibitors at the 2017 American Bee Federation conference, and it did not take long for them to consider the possibility of working together. Hopkins and Wilkes then began to talk about leveraging their respective research focuses for a more collaborative effort, which could help them accelerate their technology development and reach more beekeepers.

Hive Tracks and Hopkins are well on their way to integrating the RFID technology into the Apiary Management System. “We have begun the integration process and hope to have an RFID option tested and available for beekeepers in the spring of 2019,” said Wilkes.

“For the Healthy Hives 2020 initiative, this partnership really serves beekeepers by building one integrated platform instead of using two separate ones,” said Danielle Downey, executive director of Project Apis m. which manages the program. “One of the things we hoped would come out of this research program was innovative collaboration between the researchers, and Brandon and James are doing exactly that.”

Funded by Bayer, Healthy Hives 2020 is a $1 million research effort to improve the health of honey bee colonies in the U.S. by the end of 2020. Over the past three years, Healthy Hives 2020 has provided grants to fund 10 honey bee health research projects being conducted by 20 universities and other organizations, as well as six collaborating apiaries.

“The goal of Healthy Hives 2020 has always been to identify measurable and tangible solutions to improve colony health through enhanced collaboration and communication,” said Daniel Schmehl, Pollinator Research Scientist with Crop Science, a division of Bayer. “The collaboration between Hive Tracks and Brandon is doing just that – bringing two innovative research projects together to identify a targeted approach for beekeepers to better manage their bees.”

https://www.beeculture.com/catch-the-buzz-new-technology-makes-commercial-beekeeping-more-efficient-profitable/?utm_source=Catch+The+Buzz&utm_campaign=039cf387e9-Catch_The_Buzz_4_29_2015&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0272f190ab-039cf387e9-256252085

Friday
Jul132018

Jerry Hayes, Classroom Columnist

July 10, 2018



Longtime Classroom writer Jerry Hayes retired from Monsanto on July 6th, 2018. He had joined the agrochemical company 6 years ago, shortly after the company acquired Beeologics, an Israeli company that was pioneering RNAi technology to immunize honey bees against specific viruses. While at Monsanto, Jerry strove to inform beekeepers about the dangers of varroa, emphasizing the impacts this destructive parasite has on colony health.

The move from chief apiary inspector of Florida to Monsanto was viewed with trepidation by some beekeepers, and created a “Swarm of Controversy” described in exquisite detail by Wired magazine in a longform article that should be required reading for any lover of his Classroom column. It contends that “before he was a villain, Jerry Hayes was a hero. He considered himself one of the good guys. Many people did. They sought his advice. …Since the early 1980s Hayes has written “The Classroom,” an advice column for the American Bee Journal, America’s oldest bee magazine. He is Dear Abby for beekeepers, counseling readers on everything from capturing swarms to making shoe polish from beeswax.” Hayes joined Monsanto, because he saw that they had pockets deep enough to really help honey bee health. While there, he learned the RNAi technology of Beeologics was much further behind than he expected. The field trials were failing, as it’s much easier to kill varroa in a Petri dish than in a colony. Instead of pouring all their research dollars into stopping a single virus—Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus—he helped the agrochemical company focus its efforts on addressing the vector of the viruses—varroa. He was a frequent speaker at conferences, helping beekeepers understand how difficult it is to kill “a fist sized bug on another bug.”

Jerry will continue to write his much loved column for ABJ and we wish him much success in this next stage of his life. We will be interviewing Jerry in an upcoming issue, so stayed tuned as he reflects on what lies ahead.

https://mailchi.mp/americanbeejournal/july-10-2018-jerry-hayes-classroom-columnist?e=cb715f1bb5

Thursday
Jul122018

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 - #6: July 15, 2018, 9AM-Noon, at The Valley Hive

The next Beekeeping Class 101 will be held Sunday, July 15, 2018, 9AM-Noon, at The Valley Hive apiary location: 9633 Baden Avenue, Chatsworth. Bee Suits Required for this class

 

MEET AT OUR BEE YARD AT 9633 BADEN AVENUE.
Please be prompt - class is this Sunday at 9am.  
Please respect our neighbors.
We are guests on this property, and we are a very large group. 
Limited parking is available inside the gate and also on Baden Avenue.
The bee yard is located off a dirt road; a short walk up a hill from the parking lot. 

PROPER ATTIRE IS A MUST!
Full suit with veil and gloves are required to attend class.
Closed shoes/boots are required.
Bring bottled water.
Bring your own labeled tools, smoker, and smoker fuel  for a chance to receive more hands-on learning opportunities.

NEED SUPPLIES? Our store is located at 10538 Topanga Cyn, and it will open at 8am in case you need to purchase any last minute supplies.

REFRESHMENTS!
You are invited back to our Topanga location for refreshments and will have an opportunity to ask any questions you may have regarding your personal hive. 

If you have any last minute questions or concerns, you can contact The Valley Hive at (818) 280-6500 or via email at info@thevalleyhive.com. 

See you in class!
The Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association
The Valley Hive

Monday
Jul092018

LACBA - Help Needed!

LACBA HELP NEEDED:

Welcome to the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association request for Help Needed. We now have an LACBA Help Needed page located in our MEMBERSHIP CENTER (right Sidebar) .

The LACBA is a volunteer organization composed of commercial and urban beekeepers, bee hobbyists, and bee enthusiasts.  With the increased awareness of the plight of honeybees, the growth of Colony Collapse Disorder, the legalization of beekeeping in the City of Los Angeles, the need for honey bees in our food chain and the importance they play in our lives, our club membership has quadrupled in size over the past few years. 

One of the benefits of LACBA membership is the opportunity to learn how to care for honey bees from experienced beekeepers. Another benefit is to share our experience with others.  Requests for our skills, experience, knowledge, and services have increased and we find we are in need of LACBA members to help with our ongoing efforts to meet those requests.

THE LACBA NEEDS HELP WITH:

Beekeeping Class 101 - BeekeepersWe need volunteers who have beekeeping experienc to help teach our Beekeeping Class 101 on the 3rd Sunday of the month, 9AM-Noon, at The Valley Hive.  It is not necessary to be a long time beekeeper, (4, 5, or 6 years experience is sufficient).  Please contact: Keith Roberts at The Valley Hive: tel: 818-280-6500, Keith@thevalleyhive.com

 

LACBA Buzzings Newsletter - EditorWe need an editor who can work with our LACBA Secretary, Merrill Kruger, in getting out our monthly newsletter.  Time required: min. 2 hrs/mo. Please contact Merrill Kruger at: lacba.secretary@gmail.com. 

 

 

LACBA Education Chairperson: Requests for beekeepers to share their beekeeping experience and knowledge have increased tenfold in the past few years.  We need someone who can filter and respond to requests from schools, libraries, clubs, businesses, etc., and contact LACBA members who are available to provide these fun, exciting, educational opportunities. For more information, please contact LACBA Merrill Kruger at: lacba.secretary@gmail.com.

LA County Fair - Bee Booth
:
There are many ways members can help with the LA County Fair Bee Booth. Come help educate your community about bees! Mingle with fellow beekeepers! You'll learn more than you could ever imagine about bees by being a part of the LA County Fair Bee Booth. This is a great opportunity to share what you've learned in Beekeeping Class 101. We guarantee you won't be bored - and we could use your help at the Honey Table and with the Observation Hive.  Come, be of service to the LACBA and the honey bees.  Learn more: http://www.losangelescountybeekeepers.com/bee-booth-la-county-fair/.