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This is the official website for the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association, established in 1873. We are a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization.

Equipment, Supplies (Local)
LA COUNTY FAIR - BEE BOOTH


Welcome to the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association!

For over 130 years the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association has been serving the Los Angeles Beekeeping Community. Our group membership is composed of commercial and small scale beekeepers, bee hobbyists, and bee enthusiasts. So whether you came upon our site by design or just 'happened' to find us - welcome! Our primary purpose is the care and welfare of the honeybee. We achieve this through education of ourselves and the general public, supporting honeybee research, and practicing responsible beekeeping in an urban environment. 

"The bee is more honored than other animals, not because she labors, but because she labors for others."  Saint John Chrysostom 



Next LACBA Meeting:
Monday, March 5, 2018. General Meeting: 7PM. Open Board Meeting: 6:30PM.  

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101:
3rd Sunday of the month beginning February 18, 2018, 9AM-Noon at The Valley Hive.

Check out our Facebook page for lots of info and updates on bees; and please remember to LIKE US: https://www.facebook.com/losangelesbeekeeping 

THE LATEST BUZZ:  

Thursday
Feb152018

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 begins Sunday, February 18, 2018, 9AM-Noon, at The Valley Hive

The Los Angeles County Beekeepers Assocition Beekeeping Class 101
Sunday, February 18, 2018 from 9:00AM-Noon, at The Valley Hive.


Get there early so you can find a place to park. Bring a chair, and paper and pencil for taking notes.

Beekeeping Class 101 is the entire session of beekeeping classes: February through October 2018 (No class in September). We highly suggest you begin in February and continue through all the classes. Although you are welcome to come in the middle of the season of classes, you will have missed out on valuable information.

All the information you need in order to attend our Beekeeping Class 101 is posted on our website: http://www.losangelescountybeekeepers.com/beekeeping-classes-losangeles/. We do not send out notifications of changes in dates, schedule, times, locations. The first two classes will be held at: 10538 Topanga Canyon, Chatsworth, CA. The location for the rest of the classes TBD.

Tuesday
Feb132018

EPA Needs to Hear from Beekeepers

The following is a FB post from Virginia Bee Supply dated 2/12/18:

"This message is for all beekeepers having problems with their honeybee colonies collapsing failing to build up etc.

Tom Steeger EPA 703-305-5444 (email: steeger.thomas@epa.gov) would like to hear from you. He would to hear from as many beekeepers as he can. His comment to me was a few days ago if we don't hear from beekeepers and many of them we EPA can't began to fix the problem.
 
Send this to fellow beekeepers as well as encourage them to call. Don't put it off Do it today!!
If Tom doesn't answer leave him a message with your phone number and best time to contact you and which time zone you are in.

Tom will get back to you. He is concerned. I have known Tom for over 10 years and one of few people at EPA trying to help.

This message was sent to me this weekend for me to spread the word."

Monday
Feb122018

Happy Birthday ~ Abraham Lincoln

“I don't like to hear cut and dried sermons. No—when I hear a man preach,
I like to see him act as if he were fighting bees.”
~Abraham Lincoln

 Historical Honeybee Articles - Beekeeping History

February 12, 2014 · 

Happy Birthday ~ Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln - Born February 12, 1809 
via: Historical Honeybee Articles - Beekeeping History
DID YOU KNOW?...Abraham Lincoln was "very fond of honey."

As a child in Indiana Abraham Lincoln was used to eating honey, and a biography quoted the following from a letter written shortly after his death: "Mr. Lincoln was very fond of honey. Whenever he went to Mr. Short's house he invariably asked his wife for some bread and honey. And he liked a great deal of bee bread in it. He never touched liquor of any kind." - 68. N. W. Branson to William H. Herndon. Petersburg Ill Aug 3. 1865

“I don't like to hear cut and dried sermons. No—when I hear a man preach, I like to see him act as if he were fighting bees.”
― Abraham Lincoln

"It is an old and a true maxim, that a "drop of honey catches more flies than a gallon of gall." So with men. If you would win a man to your cause, first convince him that you are his sincere friend. Therein is a drop of honey that catches his heart, which, say what he will, is the great highroad to his reason,..." -Abraham Lincoln, Temperance Address of February 22, 1842 -Springfield, Illinois

Image: Abraham Lincoln photographed holding his glasses and a newspaper on August 9, 1863.

Sunday
Feb112018

Honey as Medicine: Historical Perspectives

IBRA   Source: Journal of Apiculture Research - 2018

The use of honey as an internal and external health agent is much older than the history of medicine itself. In a new article published in the Journal of Apicultural Research, Andrzej Kuropatnickia and colleagues from the Pedagogical University of Krakow, Poland explore the history of the use of honey for medical purposes.

The earliest recorded medical prescription including honey is from Sumer. Honey was used as a remedy against a variety of illnesses in ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome (see photo of a Roman honey jar from the IBRA / Eva Crane Historical Collection). There are frequent references to honey in sacred texts. Honey has a long tradition, not only in Western medicine but also in traditional Chinese medicine and Ayurveda. Honey was not commonly used by medical practitioners after the fall of the Roman Empire. In medieval times honey was not a popular subject of medical texts and very little was written on its use in that period. In the nineteenth century honey was neglected due to the development of modern synthetic medicine. Its comeback has, however, been observable as early as the beginnings of the twentieth century, and honey has been used again as a remedy for a variety of health problems and an excellent wound healer.

The article: “Honey as medicine: historical perspectives” can be found here: http://www.tandfonline.com/…/…/10.1080/00218839.2017.1411182

You can join IBRA here to to gain access to all papers in issue 57(1), and the entire back catalogue of the Journal of Apicultural Research to Issue 1 in 1962 and the entire back catalogue of Bee World to Issue 1 in 1919:http://www.ibrabee.org.uk/2013-05-01-02…/2014-12-12-12-06-01

IBRA is a Registered Charity No 209222. You can make a donation to help our work here: http://www.ibrabee.org.uk/ibra-donations

Sunday
Feb112018

Winter Pruning in the Bee Garden

The Bee Gardener    By Christine Casey     February 8, 2018

The Haven volunteers and I are busy doing winter pruning. I'm often asked about pruning by garden visitors: what to prune, when to do it, and how much to cut back. We prune most of our plants fairly hard to stimulate as much new growth as possible since new growth often produces more flowers. After all, making flowers to feed the bees is what we're all about!

We perform this task every year in late January and into early February. We delay pruning until then to provide forage and cover for the many birds that use the Haven and to ensure that any frost damage is confined to the outer part of the plant. Here's how we prune different types of plants at the Haven.

Herbaceous perennials

These plants are typically cut back to the base, although in the case of plants like milkweed that are late to re-sprout, it can be helpful to leave visible stems so you'll remember where the plant is located. Some examples from the Haven:

The first photo shows calamint, Calamintha nepetoides, just before pruning. You can clearly see last year's dead flower stalks with this year's new growth at the base. Cut the old stalk down to the top of the new growth.

The next picture is sedum 'Autumn Joy', Hylotelephium 'Autumn Joy' just after pruning. Isn't the new growth cute? It looks like tiny heads of lettuce! I prune this plant earlier -- in late fall or early winter -- as the hollow stems make great overwintering sites for beneficial insects like ladybird beetles.

The final example is 'Walker's Low' catmint, Nepeta x faassenii 'Walker's Low'. No need to be gentle with this plant; we prune ours with electric hedge trimmers. The photos show the same patch of plants before and after pruning.  

Calamint before pruning. Note the new growth at the base of the plant.

continue reading: http://ucanr.edu/blogs/blogcore/postdetail.cfm?postnum=26190.

NOTE: This is a really good article on gardening for bees.