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LA COUNTY FAIR - BEE BOOTH


Welcome to the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association!

For over 130 years the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association has been serving the Los Angeles Beekeeping Community. Our group membership is composed of commercial and small scale beekeepers, bee hobbyists, and bee enthusiasts. So whether you came upon our site by design or just 'happened' to find us - welcome! Our primary purpose is the care and welfare of the honeybee. We achieve this through education of ourselves and the general public, supporting honeybee research, and practicing responsible beekeeping in an urban environment. 
 

"The bee is more honored than other animals, not because she labors, but because she labors for others."        Saint John Chrysostom

Next LACBA Meeting:  Monday, November 3, 2014. Open: 6:45P.M./Start: 7:00P.M.  All are welcome!

Beekeeping Class 101:  Our 2014 Beekeeping Class 101 has ended for the season. Check back in January of next year for information on the 2015 Beekeeping Class 101.

2014 CSBA ANNUAL CONVENTION - 'Celebrating 125 Years of California Beekeeping'
November 18-20, 2014
HYATT REGENCY VALENCIA, 24500 Town Center Drive, Valencia, CA 91355
http://www.californiastatebeekeepers.com/ http://www.californiastatebeekeepers.com/events.html 
http://www.losangelescountybeekeepers.com/2014-csba-convention-info/

 Visit our Los Angeles County Beekeeping Association page on Facebook and LIKE us. We hope you enjoy the posts: https://www.facebook.com/losangelesbeekeeping 

THE LATEST BUZZ:  

Friday
Oct312014

Happy Halloween!

Have a Safe and Happy Halloween!

Thursday
Oct302014

CSBA Annual Convention: Register Now!

 You can Save on the 2014 CSBA Annual Convention if you Register Now!
Online Pre-Registration Cut-Off is November 6.  Mail no later than October 30. 

"Celebrating 125 Years of California Beekeeping" 

When the California State Beekeeper's Association, founded in 1889, meets November 18-20, in Valencia, CA for its 2014 convention, it will mark a milestone: 125 years of beekeeping. Thus the theme of this year's convention: "Celebrating 125 Years of California Beekeeping."

CSBA President, Bill Lewis, has put together a Convention Program that will inform, entertain, and enlighten.  Take some time to look it over. You should be able to find presentations addressing your level of beekeeping, from the beginning backyard hobbyist to the largest commercial beekeeper.  The hard part will be making decisions as to which sessions to attend.

Learn About Our Excellent Speakers!
 "We'll hear about things going on in the world of beekeeping on the local, state, and national levels," says Lewis. Our Keynote Speaker is Dr. Thomas Seeley, bee behavior expert from Cornell University. He'll share with us the results of his study, "A Survivor Population of European Honey Bees Living in the Wild in New York State."

Read more about A Gathering of Beekeepers.

If you're visiting from out of town and have a few more days to spend, there's lot's of Activities in Valencia/Santa Clarita Valley/and Beyond!

Each year funds raised at the CSBA convention go to research. Researchers attend the conference and provide updates. They are in "the front lines of the bee health battle," Lewis noted.

The convention (as well as membership in the California State Beekeeper's Association) is open to all interested persons.

CSBA President, Bill Lewis, says: "I hope everybody noticed page 92 of the October 2014 'Bee Culture' magazine.  Thanks Kim!"
  
It's going to be a great convention!  Don't Miss It!
Thursday
Oct302014

Good News for the Bees!

Bug Squad    By Kathy Keatley Garvey   October 29, 2014

Honey bee foraging on mustard. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)Good news for the honey bees!

And none too soon.

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Tom Vilsack announced today (Oct. 29) in a press release that "more than $4 million in technical and financial assistance will be provided to help farmers and ranchers in the Midwest improve the health of honey bees, which play an important role in crop production."

 “The future of America's food supply depends on honey bees, and this effort is one way USDA is helping improve the health of honey bee populations,” Vilsack said in the USDA release. “Significant progress has been made in understanding the factors that are associated with Colony Collapse Disorder and the overall health of honey bees, and this funding will allow us to work with farmers and ranchers to apply that knowledge over a broader area.”

The declining honey bee population is besieged with health issues, exacerbated by pests, parasites, pesticides, diseases, stress and malnutrition  Nationally, however, honey bees pollinate an estimated $15 billion worth of crops, including more than 130 fruits and vegetables. If you enjoy such produce as almonds, apples, cherries, cucumbers, and peaches, thank a bee for its pollination services.

USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is focusing the effort on five Midwestern states: Michigan, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin.

Why the Midwest? "From June to September, the Midwest is home to more than 65 percent of the commercially managed honey bees in the country. It is a critical time when bees require abundant and diverse forage across broad landscapes to build up hive strength for the winter."

The announcement renews and expands what USDA calls "a successful $3 million pilot investment that was announced earlier this year and continues to have high levels of interest."  It's all part of the June 2014 Presidential Memorandum – Creating a Federal Strategy to Promote the Health of Honey Bees and Other Pollinators, which directs USDA to expand the acreage and forage value in its conservation programs.

Funding will be provided to producers through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP). Applications are due Friday, Nov. 21.

This means that the farmers and ranchers will receive support and guidance to implement conservation practices that will provide safe and diverse food sources for honey bees. This will include appropriate cover crops or rangeland and pasture management. In addition to providing good forage and habitat for honey bees and other pollinators, the actions taken are expected to reduce erosion, increase soil health and inhibit invasive species.

California also will benefit. "This year, several NRCS state offices are setting aside additional funds for similar efforts, including California – where more than half of all managed honey bees in the U.S. help pollinate almond groves and other agricultural lands – as well as Ohio and Florida," according to the release.

A nice push for the pollinators!

Read at http://ucanr.edu/blogs/blogcore/postdetail.cfm?postnum=15758

Thursday
Oct302014

USDA to Provide $4 Million for Honey Bee Habitat

The following is brought to us by ABJ Extra.  Subscribe to the American Bee Journal and sign up for ABJ Extra 


Announcement Builds on Previous Investment in Michigan, Minnesota,
North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin


WASHINGTON, Oct.29, 2014 – Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced today that  more than $4 million in technical and financial assistance will be provided to help farmers and ranchers in the Midwest improve the health of honey bees, which play an important role in crop production.

“The future of America’s food supply depends on honey bees, and this effort is one way USDA is helping improve the health of honey bee populations,” Vilsack said. “Significant progress has been made in understanding the factors that are associated with Colony Collapse Disorder and the overall health of honey bees, and this funding will allow us to work with farmers and ranchers to apply that knowledge over a broader area.”

An estimated $15 billion worth of crops is pollinated by honey bees, including more than 130 fruits and vegetables. USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is focusing the effort on five Midwestern states: Michigan, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin. This announcement renews and expands a successful $3 million pilot investment that was announced earlier this year and continues to have high levels of interest.  This effort also contributes to the June 2014 Presidential Memorandum – Creating a Federal Strategy to Promote the Health of Honey Bees and Other Pollinators, which directs USDA to expand the acreage and forage value in its conservation programs.

Funding will be provided to producers through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP). Applications are due Friday, November 21.

From June to September, the Midwest is home to more than 65 percent of the commercially managed honey bees in the country. It is a critical time when bees require abundant and diverse forage across broad landscapes to build up hive strength for the winter.

The assistance announced today will provide guidance and support to farmers and ranchers to implement conservation practices that will provide safe and diverse food sources for honey bees. For example, appropriate cover crops or rangeland and pasture management may provide a benefit to producers by reducing erosion, increasing the health of their soil, inhibiting invasive species, and providing quality forage and habitat for honey bees and other pollinators.

This year, several NRCS state offices are setting aside additional funds for similar efforts, including California – where more than half of all managed honey bees in the U.S. help pollinate almond groves and other agricultural lands – as well as Ohio and Florida.

The 2014 Farm Bill kept pollinators as a high priority, and these conservation efforts are one way USDA is working to help improve pollinator habitat. 

USDA is actively pursuing solutions to the multiple problems affecting honey bee health. The Agricultural Research Service (ARS) maintains four laboratories across the country conducting research into all aspects of bee genetics, breeding, biology and physiology, with special focus on bee nutrition, control of pathogens and parasites, the effects of pesticide exposure and the interactions between each of these factors. The National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) supports bee research efforts in Land Grant Universities. The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) conducts national honey bee pest and disease surveys and provides border inspections to prevent new invasive bee pests from entering the U.S. The Farm Service Agency (FSA) and NRCS work on improved forage and habitat for bees through programs such as the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and EQIP. The Forest Service is restoring, improving, and/or rehabilitating pollinator habitat on the national forests and grasslands and conducting research on pollinators. Additionally, the Economic Research Service (ERS) is currently examining the direct economic costs of the pollinator problem and the associated indirect economic impacts, and the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) conducts limited surveys of honey production, number of colonies, price, and value of production which provide some data essential for research by the other agencies.

For more on technical and financial assistance available through conservation programs, visitwww.nrcs.usda.gov/GetStarted or a local USDA service center 

Wednesday
Oct292014

Invasion of the Zombees: A Bee Horror Movie

Science Friday   October 28, 2014

 

Up and down the West coast of the U.S., bees are leaving their hives, flying around at night and then suddenly dropping dead. Learn all about the parasitic horror that quietly zombifies these insects and how you can become a real-life zombee hunter.
Produced by Christian Baker 
Additional footage provided by Chris Quock and Dr. John Hafernik 
Music by Audio Network

Learn how you can become a Zombee Hunter!