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LA COUNTY FAIR - BEE BOOTH


Welcome to the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association!

For over 130 years the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association has been serving the Los Angeles Beekeeping Community. Our group membership is composed of commercial and small scale beekeepers, bee hobbyists, and bee enthusiasts. So whether you came upon our site by design or just 'happened' to find us - welcome! Our primary purpose is the care and welfare of the honeybee. We achieve this through education of ourselves and the general public, supporting honeybee research, and practicing responsible beekeeping in an urban environment. 
 

"The bee is more honored than other animals, not because she labors, but because she labors for others."        Saint John Chrysostom

Next LACBA Meeting:  Monday, March 7, 2016. Open: 6:45P.M./Start: 7:00P.M.  All are welcome! 

Beekeeping Class 101:
  First class of 2016 is Sunday, February 21, 9AM-Noon, at Bill's Bees Bee Yard. Topic: Introduction to Beekeeping Equipment, Locating a Hive, Rules and Regulations in LA County. Learn responsible beekeeping for an urban environment. All are Welcome! 

Check out our Facebook page for lots of info and updates on bees; and please remember to LIKE US: https://www.facebook.com/losangelesbeekeeping 

THE LATEST BUZZ:  

Monday
Feb082016

Surveys Posted

(Note: In addition to reporting surveys in posts, we now have a SURVEY section in the right sidebar of this website. Currently posted are the US National Beekeeper Survey (TAKE THE SURVEY!) and the 2015 CSBA Pollination Survey Results. More surveys will be posted as they are received. Thank you!)

Monday
Feb082016

US National Beekeeper Survey

Thank you for taking the time to complete this survey! Through this brief questionnaire we are hoping to gain a better understanding of current beekeeper demographics. We aim to provide current statistics to the beekeeping industry, beekeepers, and also better focus our education, outreach, and networking efforts in the beekeeping community. Your information is completely anonymous. Data will be analyzed by the Bee Girl organization’s Executive Director, Sarah Red-Laird, and Scientific Adviser, Scott Debnam, and published on www.beegirl.org. This survey will close on March 18th, 2016. 

TAKE SURVEY!

Monday
Feb082016

History of the Beekeeping Merit Badges

Reposted February 8, 2016 from Historical Honeybee Articles - Beekeeping History

On This Date In History: February 8, 1910 - The Boy Scouts of America was formed.

Scouting came to the United States from the United Kingdom in 1910, and by 1911, the BSA manufactured the first official 57 merit badges and began awarding them, among them the first beekeeping badge named 'Bee Farming.' Merit badges have been an integral part of the Scouting program since the start of the movement and are an important part of the uniform and insignia of the Boy Scouts. Among Boy Scout merit badges, the Beekeeping badge in particular has undergone a series of changes over the years.

1911 ~ Bee Farming 
Image 1
The first Boy Scout merit badge for Beekeeping was issued in 1911 and was called Bee Farming, It looked something like a fly with four legs. Square patches were used from 1911 to 1933.

To obtain a merit badge for Bee Farming a scout must:

1. Have a practical knowledge of swarming, hiving, hives and general apiculture, including a knowledge of the use of artificial combs.

2. Describe the different kinds of honey and tell from what sources gathered.

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1915 ~ Bee Keeping 
Image 1
In 1915 the badge was renamed Bee Keeping. It still looked something like a fly with four legs.

To obtain a merit badge for Bee Keeping, a scout must

1. Know how to examine a colony of bees, remove the combs, find the queen, and determine the amount of the brood, number of queen cells, and the amount of honey in the hive.

2. Distinguish between the drones, workers, eggs, larvae, pupae, honey, wax, pollen, and propolis; tell how the bees make the honey, and where the wax comes from; and explain the part played in the life of the colony by the queen, the drones, and the workers.

3. Have had experience in hiving at least one swarm. Explain the construction of the modern hive. especially in regard to the "Bee spaces."

4. Put foundations in sections and fill supers with sections; and also remove filled supers from the hive and prepare honey for the market.

In 1928 an additional requirement was added to obtain a Bee Keeping merit badge:

5. Write an acceptable article of not more than two hundred words on the differences in honeys according to the flowers from which the nectar is obtained.

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1934-1935 ~ Bee Keeping
Image 2

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1936-1937 ~ Bee Keeping
Image 3

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1937-1938 ~ Bee Keeping
Not Shown

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1940-1942 ~ Bee Keeping
Image 4

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1940-1942 ~ Bee Keeping
Image 5

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1947-1951 ~ Bee Keeping
Image 6

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1952-1956 ~ Bee Keeping
Image 7

In 1956 the badge was renamed Beekeeping.

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1957-1960 ~ Beekeeping
Image 8

In 1957 the badge was redesigned to look like a real live bee.

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1961-1971 ~ Beekeeping
Image 9

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1967 ~ Beekeeping
Image 10

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1972-1975 ~ Beekeeping
Image 11

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1972-1975 ~ Beekeeping
Image 12

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1976-1980 ~ Beekeeping
Image 13

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1994-1995 ~ Beekeeping
Image 14

1995 ~ The Beekeeping merit badge was discontinued.

The Beekeeping merit badge was offered from 1911 until 1995. From 1980 to 1994, the number of youth earning this merit badge ranged from 700 to 1,000 per year. That decline in interest eventually led to its demise in 1995.

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2012 ~ The Boy Scouts of America respond to demands for reinstatement of the beekeeping merit badge:

"In recent years, Scouts and Scouters have expressed a desire for the Beekeeping merit badge to be reinstated. They have been concerned about the vital role bees play in our ecosystem and that Scouts seem increasingly unaware of the problems honeybees face today. After a great deal of research and consideration, much of the old Beekeeping merit badge requirements and related activities and lessons will soon be incorporated into several existing badges. Those affected include Environmental Science, Forestry, Gardening, Insect Study, Nature, and Plant Science. As a result, more Scouts will be exposed to honeybee issues than if the merit badge were reinstated." -Advancement News June/July 2012

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1994 ~ Insect Study
Image 15

At the present state, beekeeping is a partial requirement in the merit badge; Insect Study. Much of the old Beekeeping merit badge requirements and related activities and lessons were incorporated into this badge.

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1952 ~ Nature
Image 16

At the present state, beekeeping is a partial requirement in the merit badge; Nature. Much of the old Beekeeping merit badge requirements and related activities and lessons were incorporated into this badge.

Source:

Advancement News June/July 2012
http://www.scouting.org/…/advancement…/512-075_June_July.pdf

Boy Scouts of America: The Official Handbook for Boys By Boy Scouts of America, 1911, page 41

Boy Scouts of America: The Official Handbook for Boys By Boy Scouts of America, 1915, page 36

Beekeeping Merit Badge
http://scouteradam.com/2013/10/04/beekeeping-merit-badge/

Handbook for Boys
By Boy Scouts of America 1915 page 36

Insect Study
http://www.usscouts.org/mb/mb065.asp

Nature
http://www.usscouts.org/usscouts/mb/mb078.asp

Collecting Merit Badges
http://www.scouttrader.org/collecting/meritbadge.pdf

Scouting.org - insect study 
http://www.scouting.org/filest…/boyscouts/…/insect_study.htm

Nature Merit Badge
http://bsaseabase.org/…/advancemen…/meritbadges/mb-natu.aspx

Boy Scout Insignia Virtual Museum 
http://boyscoutimages.com/search

The Future of Beekeeping and the BSA
http://www.threefirescouncil.org/…/a…/additional-recognition

Boy Scout Merit Badges
http://www.boyscoutstore.com/…/national-bsa-i…/merit-badges/

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Research in progress:
Number of beekeeping merit badges issued by year:
Can you help fill in the missing dates?

1911 - 0
1912 - 25
1913 - 62
1914 - 214
1915 - 39
1916 - 19

Annual Report of the Boy Scouts of America: 1917 page 55
https://books.google.com/books…

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1917 - 19
1918 - 51
1919 - 97
1920 - 66
1921 - 147
1922 - 199
1923 - 207
1924 - 190

1927 - 407?
1941 - 5,027?
1928 - 1,154?

Annual Report of the Boy Scouts of America. 1924 page 49
Comparative merit-badge table for eight years

https://books.google.com/books…

Monday
Feb082016

Boy Scouts Bee Keeping Merit Badge

Reposted from February 7, 2016 Historical Honeybee Articles - Beekeeping History

circa. 1926~ Bee Keeping Merit Badge Pamphlet

On February 8, we will celebrate 106 years since the founding of the Boy Scouts of America on February 8, 1910. On the 8th, I will publish The History of the Beekeeping Merit Badge

Invite your friends to participate:
Historical Honeybee Articles - Beekeeping History

To obtain a merit badge for Bee Keeping in 1928, a scout must

1. Know how to examine a colony of bees, remove the combs, find the queen, and determine the amount of the brood, number of queen cells, and the amount of honey in the hive.

2. Distinguish between the drones, workers, eggs, larvae, pupae, honey, wax, pollen, and propolis; tell how the bees make the honey, and where the wax comes from; and explain the part played in the life of the colony by the queen, the drones, and the workers.

3. Have had experience in hiving at least one swarm. Explain the construction of the modern hive. especially in regard to the "Bee spaces."

4. Put foundations in sections and fill supers with sections; and also remove filled supers from the hive and prepare honey for the market.

Sunday
Feb072016

National Honey Board Recipes for February

Score Big With Honey!

This weekend the National Football League (NFL) is celebrating 50 years. That’s 50 years of “I could hear that from here!” tackles, “Did that just happen?!?” plays, “I can’t believe it!” tear-inducing losses and “We are the champions!” sweet victories.

But it’s not just about the game, or the coaches or the players. What makes the Super Bowl great is the experience of it all, the atmosphere you create when you bring good friends together with great food. That’s right, this is a holiday for food, and we’ve got five new recipes that will show you how to score big this weekend with honey!

So much more than just a sweetener, all-natural honey performs a slew of tasks, making it a true game changer in the kitchen: 

  • Flavor: Honey not only imparts a unique flavor to any dish, but it also balances and enhances the flavor profiles of other ingredients used in a recipe.
  • Emulsifier: Honey acts as a binder and thickener for sauces, dressings, marinades and dips.
  • Humectant: Honey provides and retains moisture to a variety of dishes, helping you lock in moisture for grilled meats. 

 So take it to the house and make honey your VIP this weekend.

Curried Honey-Glazed Chicken Wings
Chipotle-Mango Salsa
Grilled Chicken Satay with Honey Peanut Sauce
Peppered Asiago Bacon Burgers with Honeyed Arugula  
Honey Shanty 
Super Bowl Recipes 
http://www.honey.com/