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This is the official website for the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association, established in 1873. We are a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization.

Bare Bees:
kevin.heydman@gmail.com
Bill's Bees
Holly Hawk 626-807-0572
The Valley Hive 

Equipment, Supplies (Local)
LA COUNTY FAIR - BEE BOOTH


Welcome to the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association!

For over 130 years the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association has been serving the Los Angeles Beekeeping Community. Our group membership is composed of commercial and small scale beekeepers, bee hobbyists, and bee enthusiasts. So whether you came upon our site by design or just 'happened' to find us - welcome! Our primary purpose is the care and welfare of the honeybee. We achieve this through education of ourselves and the general public, supporting honeybee research, and practicing responsible beekeeping in an urban environment. 

"The bee is more honored than other animals, not because she labors, but because she labors for others."  Saint John Chrysostom 



Next LACBA Meeting:
Monday, May 7, 2018. General Meeting: 7PM. Open Board Meeting: 6:30PM.  

Next LACBA Beekeeping Class 101:
Sunday, April 15, 2018, 9AM-Noon at The Valley Hive.

Check out our Facebook page for lots of info and updates on bees; and please remember to LIKE US: https://www.facebook.com/losangelesbeekeeping 

THE LATEST BUZZ:  

Saturday
Apr212018

AB-2468 Bees: apiaries: registration: colony relocation. (2017-2018)

 DATE PUBLISHED: 03/23/18 09:00PM

CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE - 2017-2018 REGULAR SESSION

An act to amend Section 29043 Sections 29042, 29045, 29046, 29070, 29070.5, and 29074 of the Food and Agricultural Code, relating to bees.

ASSEMBLY BILL No. 2468

Introduced by Assembly Member Arambula

February 14, 2018

An act to amend Section 29043 Sections 29042, 29045, 29046, 29070, 29070.5, and 29074 of the Food and Agricultural Code, relating to bees.

LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST

AB 2468, as amended, Arambula. Bees: apiaries: registration. registration: colony relocation.

Existing law

(1) Existing law, the Apiary Protection Act, provides for the regulation and management of apiaries. Existing law requires that registration of an apiary be filed with the agricultural commissioner of the county in which the apiary is located, or with the Secretary of Food and Agriculture if there is no agricultural commissioner in the county. Existing law requires the secretary to adopt a form of registration to be used statewide, which includes a request for notification of use of pesticide, as prescribed, and specifies that all county agricultural commissioners shall use the same form. Existing law requires every person who moves bees into the state or otherwise comes into possession of an apiary that is located within the state after the first day of January to register the number of colonies moved into the state or so acquired within 30 days after coming into possession of the apiary.

This bill would make nonsustative changes in those provisions requiring the registration of apiaries.

This bill would instead require every person who moves bees into the state or otherwise comes into possession of such an apiary to register the name of the owner, number, and location of colonies moved into the state or so acquired within 30 days after coming into possession of the apiary. To the extent that the bill would impose additional duties on county agricultural commissioners, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.

Existing law prohibits a person from maintaining any apiary that is not registered pursuant to the above-described provisions.

This bill would instead provide that it is unlawful for a person to maintain any apiary that is not registered pursuant to those provisions.

Existing law requires any person relocating a colony of bees from a registered apiary in one county to another county, where the apiary is currently not registered, to notify the destination county agricultural commissioner by telephone within 5 days of the first movement.

This bill would instead require any such person relocating a colony of bees to make that notification within 72 hours of the first movement.

Existing law provides that any apiary operator or his or her designated representative relocating a colony of bees within a county where the apiary is currently registered is not required to notify the county agricultural commissioner of the movement.

This bill would instead require any apiary operator or his or her designated representative relocating a colony of bees within a county where the apiary is currently registered to notify the county agricultural commissioner of the movement. By imposing new notification requirements, a violation of which is a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.

This bill would also make various nonsubstantive changes.

The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.

This bill would provide that with regard to certain mandates no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

With regard to any other mandates, this bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs so mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

DIGEST KEY

Vote: majority   Appropriation: no   Fiscal Committee: noyes   Local Program: noyes  


BILL TEXT

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:

SECTION 1.

 Section 29042 of the Food and Agricultural Code is amended to read:

29042.

 Every person who moves bees into the state or otherwise comes into possession of an apiary that is located within the state after the first day of January, shall register the number name of the owner, number, and location of colonies moved into the state or so acquired within 30 days after coming into possession of the apiary.

SEC. 2.

 Section 29045 of the Food and Agricultural Code is amended to read:

29045.

 No person shall It is unlawful for a person to maintain any apiary which that is not registered pursuant to this article. Each registration is valid until January 1 of the following year.

SEC. 3.

 Section 29046 of the Food and Agricultural Code is amended to read:

29046.

 (a) No person shall maintain an apiary on premises other than that of his or her residence unless the apiary is identified as follows:

(1) By a sign that is prominently displayed on the entrance side of the apiary or stenciled on the hive, that states in dark letters not less than one inch in height on a background of contrasting color, the name of the owner or person responsible for the apiary, his or her address and telephone number, or if he or she has no telephone, a statement to that effect.

(2) If the governing body of the county or city in which the apiary is located has provided by ordinance for the identification of apiaries, in the manner whichthat is prescribed in the ordinance.

(b) No person shall locate or maintain an apiary on private land not owned or leased by the person unless the person has approval from the owner of record, or an authorized agent thereof, of the owner of record, and can establish approval upon demand of the director secretary or commissioner. The approval shall include the name and phone number of the person granting approval.

(c) (1) No person shall locate or maintain an apiary on any public land without the expressed oral or written approval of the entity which that owns, leases, controls, or occupies the land, and can establish this approval upon demand of the director secretary or the commissioner. The approval shall include the name and telephone number of the person granting the approval. During the citrus bloom period, as established by the commissioner, including 72 hours prior to before the declaration of the bloom period until 48 hours after the conclusion of the bloom period, the apiary operator shall obtain written permission to place bees on public land, and shall make it available to the director secretary or the commissioner upon demand. Any apiary located or maintained on public land without lawful consent is a public nuisance and may be subject to seizure by the director secretary or the commissioner.

(2) The director secretary or commissioner may commence proceedings in the superior court of the county or city and county in which the seizure is made petitioning the court for judgment forfeiting the apiary. Upon the filing of the petition, the clerk of the court shall fix a time for a hearing and cause notices to be posted for 14 days in at least three public places in the place where the court is held, if the person owning the apiary is unknown, setting forth the substance of the petition and the time and place fixed for its hearing. At that time, the court shall hear and determine the proceeding and upon proof that the apiary was located or maintained on public lands without approval of the entity, may order the apiary forfeited. Any apiary so forfeited shall be sold or destroyed by the director secretary or the commissioner. The proceeds from all sales shall be used in accordance with Section 29032.

SEC. 4.

 Section 29070 of the Food and Agricultural Code is amended to read:

29070.

 (a) Any person relocating a colony of bees from a registered apiary in one county to another county, where the apiary is not registered for the current calendar year, shall notify the destination commissioner by telephone within five days within 72 hours of the first movement. The notification shall include all of the following:

(1) The name and address of the apiary operator or his or her designated representative.

(2) A telephone number where the apiary operator or his or her designated representative may be reached.

(b) The apiary operator or his or her designated representative shall provide locations of each colony upon request by the commissioner of any county.

(c) Subsequent movement into the destination county shall not require further notification to the commissioner if, when the apiary operator removes the last colony from the county, he or she notifies the commissioner of that final movement within 72 hours.

SEC. 5.

 Section 29070.5 of the Food and Agricultural Code is amended to read:

29070.5.

 (a)Any apiary operator or his or her designated representative relocating a colony of bees within a county where the apiary is currently registered is not required to shall notify the commissioner of the movement.

(b)The apiary operator or his or her designated representative shall provide the commissioner with all locations of colonies upon request.

SEC. 6.

 Section 29074 of the Food and Agricultural Code is amended to read:

29074.

 The director secretary, by written permit, subject to conditions the director secretary may determine are necessary to protect the beekeeping industry of this state, may authorize federal and state agencies to transport and maintain within the state diseased bees, comb, hives, appliances, or colonies for the purpose of studying methods of eradicating and controlling bee diseases.

SEC. 7.

 No reimbursement is required by this act pursuant to Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution for certain costs that may be incurred by a local agency or school district because, in that regard, this act creates a new crime or infraction, eliminates a crime or infraction, or changes the penalty for a crime or infraction, within the meaning of Section 17556 of the Government Code, or changes the definition of a crime within the meaning of Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution.

However, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that this act contains other costs mandated by the state, reimbursement to local agencies and school districts for those costs shall be made pursuant to Part 7 (commencing with Section 17500) of Division 4 of Title 2 of the Government Code.

SECTION 1.Section 29043 of the Food and Agricultural Code is amended to read:

29043.

Registration of an apiary shall be filed with the commissioner of the county in which the apiary is located, or with the secretary if there is no commissioner in the county. The secretary shall adopt a form of registration to be used statewide, which shall include a request for notification of the use of pesticide in accordance with Section 29101. All commissioners shall use the same form.

***
http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201720180AB2468

pdf: AB-2468 date 03232018

(Thank you to Nick Heydman for sharing this latest information on bee registration in California.)

Saturday
Apr212018

Breakthrough Could Aid Development of Bee-Friendly Pesticides

Science Daily    University of Exeter     March 22, 2018

A new discovery opens up the door to designing bee-friendly insecticides. Credit: © Igor / Fotolia

Efforts to create pesticides that are not toxic to bees have been boosted by a scientific breakthrough.

A joint study by the University of Exeter, Rothamsted Research and Bayer AG has discovered the enzymes in honeybees and bumblebees that determine how sensitive they are to different neonicotinoid pesticides.

The potential impact of neonicotinoids on bee health is a subject of intensive research and considerable controversy, with the European Union having restricted three compounds on crops that are attractive to bees in 2013.

However, both honeybees and bumblebees exhibit profound differences in their sensitivity to different members of this insecticide class. The researchers aimed to understand why this is, in order to aid the development of pesticides that are non-toxic to them.

Just as in other organisms, toxins in bees can be broken down by enzymes called cytochrome P450s. The study identified one subfamily of these enzymes in bees -- CYP9Q -- and found it was responsible for the rapid breakdown of certain neonicotinoids.

"Identifying these key enzymes provides valuable tools to screen new pesticides early in their development to see if bees can break them down," said Professor Chris Bass, who led the team at the University of Exeter.

"It can take a decade and $260 million to develop a single pesticide, so this knowledge can help us avoid wasting time and money on pesticides that will end up with substantial use restrictions due to intrinsic bee toxicity."

Dr Ralf Nauen, insect toxicologist and lead investigator of the study at Bayer added: "Knowing the mechanisms contributing to inherent tolerance helps us and regulators to better understand why certain insecticides have a high margin of safety to bees."

"The knowledge from our study can also be used to predict and prevent potential harmful effects that result from inadvertently blocking these key defence systems, for instance by different pesticides (such as certain fungicides) that may be applied in combination with insecticides."

Professor Lin Field, Head of the Department of Biointeractions and Crop Protection at Rothamsted Research added: "Some neonicotinoids are intrinsically highly toxic to bees but others have very low acute toxicity, but in public debate they tend to get tarred with the same brush.

"Each insecticide needs to be considered on its own risks and merits, not just its name."

The researchers carried out the most comprehensive analysis of bee P450 detoxification enzymes ever attempted.

Comparing the effects of two neonicotinoids, they found bees metabolise thiacloprid very efficiently, while they metabolise imidacloprid much less efficiently.

Although previous work had suggested rate of metabolism might explain why bees react differently to different neonicotinoids, the specific genes or enzymes were unknown until now.

The research was part funded by Bayer, which is a manufacturer of neonicotinoid insecticides.


Story Source:

Materials provided by University of Exeter. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

Cristina Manjon, Bartlomiej J. Troczka, Marion Zaworra, Katherine Beadle, Emma Randall, Gillian Hertlein, Kumar Saurabh Singh, Christoph T. Zimmer, Rafael A. Homem, Bettina Lueke, Rebecca Reid, Laura Kor, Maxie Kohler, Jürgen Benting, Martin S. Williamson, T.G. Emyr Davies, Linda M. Field, Chris Bass, Ralf Nauen. Unravelling the Molecular Determinants of Bee Sensitivity to Neonicotinoid Insecticides. Current Biology, 2018; DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2018.02.045

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/03/180322125021.htm

Saturday
Apr212018

Bust A Move! A German Robot Dances To Communicate With Honey Bees

DigitalTrends    By Luke Dormehl    April 8, 2018

Humans use tools like Google Maps to tell us the location of our nearest restaurant or supermarket, and very soon foraging bees might get a similarly high-tech helping hand. Researchers at Germany’s Free University of Berlin have developed the RoboBee robot, which shows the best foraging locations by mimicking a dance that bees employ to relay this information to one another.

“Honeybees communicate newly found food locations to nestmates via the bee ‘waggle dance,’ a series of motion patterns they perform in the darkness of the hive,” Tim Landgraf, a professor in the Dahlem Center for Machine Learning and Robotics, told Digital Trends. “Interested bees somehow decode the dance and know how to reach the new food place. To understand this process better we have built a robot that imitates the bee dance in its various components. Essentially, the robot is a bee-sized piece of soft sponge on a stick, moved by a plotter-like positioning system. It can perform the typical waggle dance motion, beat its wings and provide drops of food samples to interested bees.”

Landgraf notes that the idea of using a robot to communicate with bees had been discussed for decades. However, the Berlin-based researchers were the first to show that bees can successfully decode the robot’s message. Not all of the bees were interested in the robot, though. “This may be due to the robot being slightly off in terms of the way it reproduces dance-related cues, or it may produce unwanted stimuli that disturb the bees,” he continued. “One cause may also that our understanding of the bee dance is incomplete. Even natural dances have only a few followers.”

The researchers next plan to use the findings in another project called BeesBook, in which bees are tracked over the course of their entire lifespan. The hope is that this will allow greater understanding of bee behavior and enable the robot to be improved accordingly.

“Right now I am not thinking about commercializing,” Landgraf said. “Beekeepers don’t need robots to tell bees to pollinate their apple trees; they just put their hives on the plantation. However, the general idea of interfacing with living systems is worth investigating deeper. With or without robots, technology may help understand animal needs better, assess health status in an automatized fashion, enrich environments, and so on.”

https://www.digitaltrends.com/cool-tech/robot-dances-honeybees-robobee/?platform=hootsuite

Saturday
Apr212018

A New Hope: Rare Bee Discovered in Alberta, Canada

ABJ Extra     April 17, 2018

One of the host bee species, Macropis nuda, collecting oil from a Lysimachia terrestris flower. Credit: Dr. Cory S. Sheffield

The Macropis Cuckoo Bee is one of the rarest bees in North America, partly because of its specialized ecological associations. It is a nest parasite of oil-collecting bees of the genus Macropis which, in turn, are dependent on oil-producing flowers of the genus Lysimachia.

In fact, the cuckoo bee - which much like its feather-bearing counterpart does not build a nest of its own, but lays its eggs in those of other species instead - is so rare that it was thought to have gone extinct until it was collected in Nova Scotia, Canada, in the early 2000s. As a result, the Macropis Cuckoo Bee was brought to the attention of the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada(COSEWIC).

Recently, an individual reported from Alberta, Canada, brought new hope for the survival of the species. In addition to previously collected specimens from Ontario, this record greatly expands the known range of the cuckoo.

Scientists Dr. Cory S Sheffield, Royal Saskatchewan Museum, Canada, who was the one to rediscover the "extinct" species in Nova Scotia, and Jennifer Heron,British Columbia Ministry of Environment & Climate Change Strategy, present their new data, and discuss the conservation status of this species in their paper, published in the open access journal Biodiversity Data Journal.

"This species has a very interesting biology," they say, "being a nest parasite - or cuckoo - of another group of bees that in turn have very specialized dietary needs."

The hosts, bees of the genus Macropis (which themselves are quite rare) are entirely dependent on plants of the primrose genus Lysimachia. Moreover, they only go after those Lysimachia species whose flowers produce oil droplets, which the insects collect and feed to their larvae. Thus, Macropis bees require these oil-producing flowers to exist just like Macropis Cuckoo Bees need their hosts and their nests. Curiously, this reliance, as suggested by previous studies on related European species, has made the female cuckoos develop the ability to find their host's nests by the smell of the floral oils.

"This level of co-dependence between flower, bee, and cuckoo bee, makes for a very tenuous existence, especially for the cuckoo," the authors comment. "The recent specimen from Alberta lets us know that the species is still out there, and is more widespread than we thought."

In conclusion, the authors suggest that continuing to monitor for populations of rare bees, and documenting historic records, are crucial for conservation status assessments of at-risk species.

"Biodiversity Data Journal provides a great venue to share this type of information with our colleagues for regional, national, and international efforts for species conservation," they note.

Original source:
Sheffield C, Heron J (2018) A new western Canadian record of Epeoloides pilosulus (Cresson), with discussion of ecological associations, distribution and conservation status in Canada. Biodiversity Data Journal 6: e22837.https://doi.org/10.3897/BDJ.6.e22837

Thursday
Apr122018

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 - #3: Sunday, April 15, 2018, 9AM-Noon, at The Valley Hive Apiary Location

Join The Valley Hive & The Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association for Beekeeping 101 class #3.

PLEASE READ CAREFULLY!!

Our 3rd class will meet at our bee yard located at 9633 Baden Avenue at 9am this Sunday. This is in a residential neighborhood on a horse property. Please be respectful of our neighbors. Parking is available inside the gate.

The bee yard is located off a dirt road; a short walk up a hill from the parking lot. 

You must wear protective clothing, as we will be opening hives during this class. High Top shoes are suggested. 

Make sure to bring water; it may be hot!

Our store, located at 10538 Topanga Cyn, will open at 8am in case you need to purchase any last minute supplies.

Join us after class at our Topanga location for refreshments and the opportunity to talk to other beekeepers in your community. 

If you have any last minute questions or concerns, you can contact The Valley Hive at (818) 280-6500 or via email at info@thevalleyhive.com

For more information, check out our LACBA Beekeeping Class 101.