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2014 Bee Calendar 
 @Kodua Photography


Welcome to the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association!

For over 130 years the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association has been serving the Los Angeles Beekeeping Community. Our group membership is composed of commercial and small scale beekeepers, bee hobbyists, and bee enthusiasts. So whether you came upon our site by design or just 'happened' to find us - welcome! Our primary purpose is the care and welfare of the honeybee. We achieve this through education of ourselves and the general public, supporting honeybee research, and practicing responsible beekeeping in an urban environment. 
 

"The bee is more honored than other animals, not because she labors, but because she labors for others."        Saint John Chrysostom

Next LACBA Meeting:  Monday, August 4, 2014. Open: 6:45P.M./Start: 7:00P.M.  All are welcome!

Next Beekeeping Class 101:  Sunday, July 20, 2014. Time: 9:00am-noon.  Location:  Bill's Bees Bee Yard. Topic: Hive Management.  BEE SUITS REQUIRED. Come, learn responsible beekeeping for an urban environment.  Everyone welcome!.   

THE LATEST BUZZ:  

Friday
Jul252014

Time Running Out for Good Food Awards. Get YOUR Honey in the Running

The Good Food Awards launches its fifth year with a call for entries July 7 - August 1!

The Good Food Merchants Guild invites food and drink producers from across the country to submit their beer, charcuterie, cheese, chocolate, coffee, confections, pickles, preserves, oils, spirits and – new this year – honey to the premier program recognizing excellence in tasty, authentic and responsible hand crafted food. In celebration of its fifth anniversary and to recognize more exceptional food crafters, the Good Food Awards has expanded existing categories to include cider (Beer), kombucha (Pickles), yogurt and kefir (Cheese), preserved fish (Charcuterie) and cocktail modifiers (Spirits).

In September, a Blind Tasting with 200 food producers, chefs, journalists and industry experts will determine which products become the 2015 Good Food Award Winners. The catch: everything must be produced with a commitment to environmental and social responsibility, which means eliminating the use of synthetic inputs, ensuring supply chain transparency and supporting local economies.

The short online entry form and sustainability criteria are available at goodfoodawards.org from July 7-August 1. The entry fee is $65, which goes to cover the cost of sorting, storing and transporting the anticipated 1,800 entries. To receive one FREE entry, become part of the emerging network of tasty, authentic and responsible businesses by joining the Good Food Merchants Guild.

The anticipated 140 winners are honored at a gala Awards Ceremony alongside food luminaries in San Francisco (this year’s keynote and MC are being kept under wraps, last year Alice Waters, Ruth Reichl and Zeke Emanuel did the honors). Award Winners are also invited to sell their winning products at a 15,000-person Good Food Awards Marketplace in the iconic San Francisco Ferry Building and proudly display the Good Food Awards Seal all year long. Additional benefits include media coverage in 200 outlets nationwide - last year winners were covered in the San Francisco Chronicle, SierraFood + Wine andWashington Post; as well as new retail opportunities with sponsors Williams-Sonoma, Whole Foods Markets, Bi-Rite Market and more. Winning businesses have reported significant sales increases, in some cases up to 400%. Enter by August 1 at www.goodfoodawards.org.

Thursday
Jul242014

Vasculature of the Hives: How Honey Bees Stay Cool

Science Daily    Source: Tufts University    July 23, 2014

Honey bees, especially the young, are highly sensitive to temperature and to protect developing bees, adults work together to maintain temperatures within a narrow range. Recently published research led by Philip T. Starks, a biologist at Tufts University's School of Arts and Sciences, is the first to show that worker bees dissipate excess heat within a hive in process similar to how humans and other mammals cool themselves through their blood vessels and skin.

"This study shows how workers effectively dissipate the heat absorbed via heat-shielding, a mechanism used to thwart localized heat stressors," says Starks. The research is published in the June 10 edition of the journal Naturwissenschaften, which appeared online April 24.

This discovery also supports the theoretical construct of the bee hive as a superorganism -- an entity in which its many members carry out specialized and vital functions to keep the whole functioning as a unit.

Young bees develop within wax cells. For healthy development, the youngsters must be maintained between 32 degrees Celsius, or 89.6 degrees Fahrenheit, and 35 degrees Celsius, or 95 degrees Fahrenheit. In contrast, adults can withstand temperatures as high as 50 degrees Celsius, or 122 degrees Fahrenheit

Previous research has shown that workers bees, among other duties, control the thermostat essential to the hive's survival.

When temperatures dip, worker bees create heat by contracting their thoracic muscles, similar to shivering in mammals. To protect the vulnerable brood when it's hot, workers fan the comb, spread fluid to induce evaporative cooling, or -- when the heat stress is localized -- absorb heat by pressing themselves against the brood nest wall (a behavior known as heat-shielding).

But until the Tufts study, scientists did not know how the bees got rid of the heat after they had absorbed it.

Starks' team included doctoral student Rachael E. Bonoan, former undergraduate student Rhyan R. Goldman, and Peter Y. Wong, a research associate professor in the department of mechanical engineering in the School of Engineering at Tufts. Bonoan and Goldman collected data on seven active honeybee hives that were framed by clear Plexiglas walls.

Each colony numbered 1,000 to 2,500 adult bees. An eighth hive, empty of bees, was used as a control. Using a theater light, the researchers raised the internal temperature of all eight hives for 15 minutes. Temperature probes recorded internal temperature throughout the heating portion of the experiment.

As anticipated, the worker bees pressed their bodies against the heated surfaces near the brood. Like insect sponges, they absorbed the heat, which lowered temperatures. After 15 minutes, a time brief enough to prevent serious harm to the bees, the theater light was turned off.

Immediately following, heat movement within the hive and external hive temperatures were tracked via thermal imaging. Within 10 minutes of cooling, temperatures in the active hives were down to safe levels. Meanwhile, the control hive remained at 40 degrees Celsius. "Since the control hive did not have bees, the differences in temperature were likely caused by worker behavior," Starks says.

Using thermal imaging, the scientists observed that temperatures increased peripheral to the heated regions of the hive as the brood nest began to cool. The thermal images clearly showed that the bees had physically moved the absorbed heat in their bodies to previously cooler areas of the hive. "Moving heat from hot to cool areas is reminiscent of the bioheat transfer via the cardiovascular system of mammals," says Starks.

This research was supported by the Tufts University Biology Department and the Tufts University National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates Program (DBI 263030).

Read at: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140723161912.htm

Thursday
Jul242014

China-Beeswax Sculptures

ApiNews  By Analia Manriquez   July 9, 2014
 
Artist Ren Ri (who trained at Tsinghua Academy of Art and Saint Petersburg State University in Russia) creates works that explore the relationship between humans and nature.

View at: http://www.apinews.com/en/news/item/25998-china-beewax-sculptures

Wednesday
Jul232014

Radio Frequency ID Tags on Honey bees Reveal Hive Dynamics

 This message brought to us by CATCH THE BUZZ: Kim Flottum    July 22, 2014

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Scientists attached radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags to hundreds of individual honey bees and tracked them for several weeks. The effort yielded two discoveries: Some foraging bees are much busier than others; and if those busy bees disappear, others will take their place.

The findings are reported in the journal Animal Behaviour.

Tagging the bees revealed that about 20 percent of the foraging bees in a hive brought home more than half of the nectar and pollen gathered to feed the hive.

"We found that some bees are working very, very hard – as we would have expected," said University of Illinois Institute for Genomic Biology director Gene E. Robinson, who led the research. "But then we found some other bees that were not working as hard as the others."

Citizen scientist Paul Tenczar developed the technique for attaching RFID tags to bees and tracking their flight activity with monitors. He and Neuroscience Program graduate student Claudia Lutz measured the foraging activities of bees in several locations, including some in hives in a controlled foraging environment. (Watch a video about this work.)

Vikyath Rao, a graduate student in the laboratory of U. of I. physics professor Nigel Goldenfeld, analyzed the data using a computer model Rao and Goldenfeld developed.

Previous studies, primarily in ants, have found that some social insects work much harder than others in the same colony, Robinson said.

"The assumption has always been that these 'elite' individuals are in some way intrinsically better, that they were born that way," he said.

While it is well known that genetic differences underlie differences in many types of behavior, the new findings show that "sometimes it is important to give individuals a chance in a different situation to truly find out how different they are from each other," Robinson said.

Removal of the elite bees "was associated with an almost five-fold increase in activity level in previously low-activity foragers," the researchers wrote. The change occurred within 24 hours, Tenczar said. This demonstrates that other individuals within the hive also have the capacity to become elites when necessary, Robinson said.

"It is still possible that there truly are elite bees that have some differential abilities to work harder than others, but it's a larger group than first estimated," Robinson said. "Or it could be that all bees are capable of working at this level and there's some kind of colony-level regulation that has some of them working really, really hard, making many trips while others make fewer trips."

Perhaps the less-busy bees function as a kind of reserve force that can kick into high gear if something happens to the super-foragers, Robinson said.

"Our observation is that the colony bounces back to a situation where some bees are very active and some are less active," he said. "Why is that? We don't know. Do all bees have that capability? We still don't know."

Read at: http://home.ezezine.com/1636/1636-2014.07.23.07.08.archive.html

Read more at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003347214002589

CATCH THE BUZZ: Kim Flottum,  Bee Culture, The Magazine Of American Beekeeping, published by the A.I. Root Company. Twitter.FacebookBee Culture’s Blog.

Monday
Jul212014

National Honey Board Calls for Research Proposals to Seek Ways to Increase US Honey Production

This message brought to us by CATCH THE BUZZ: Kim Flottum  July 21, 2014

Firestone, Colo., July 21, 2014 – The National Honey Board has issued a call for research proposals to study how to increase U.S. honey production. The goal of the study will be to provide the National Honey Board as well as the U.S. honey and beekeeping industry with possible strategies and action steps to proactively address ways of increasing U.S. honey production. The amount being considered by the Honey Board is in the healthy five figures, according to Bruce Boynton,Chief Executive Officer.

“Many ideas have been mentioned as possible causes of declining honey production,” said Bruce Boynton, CEO of the National Honey Board. “This project could take any one of several directions, from looking into declining forage, changes in agricultural crops, re-seeding with crops that are less favorable to honey production, and challenges to maintaining the health of the honeybees.”

The deadline for proposals is October 15, 2014. Proposals will be reviewed and considered for funding in the Board’s calendar year 2015 budget.

The National Honey Board is an industry-funded agriculture promotion group that works to educate consumers about the benefits and uses for honey and honey products through research, marketing and promotional programs.

CATCH THE BUZZ by Kim Flottum: Bee Culture, The Magazine Of American Beekeeping, published by the A.I. Root Company. Twitter.FacebookBee Culture’s Blog.