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This is the official website for the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association established in 1873.

 

Bare Bees:
kevin.heydman@gmail.com
Bill's Bees
Holly Hawk 626-807-0572
The Valley Hive 

Equipment, Supplies (Local)
LA COUNTY FAIR - BEE BOOTH


Welcome to the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association!

For over 130 years the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association has been serving the Los Angeles Beekeeping Community. Our group membership is composed of commercial and small scale beekeepers, bee hobbyists, and bee enthusiasts. So whether you came upon our site by design or just 'happened' to find us - welcome! Our primary purpose is the care and welfare of the honeybee. We achieve this through education of ourselves and the general public, supporting honeybee research, and practicing responsible beekeeping in an urban environment. 

"The bee is more honored than other animals, not because she labors, but because she labors for others."  Saint John Chrysostom 



Next LACBA Meeting:
Monday, June 4, 2018. General Meeting: 7PM. Open Board Meeting: 6:30PM.  

Next LACBA Beekeeping Class 101:
Sunday, June 17, 2018, 9AM-Noon at The Valley Hive.

Check out our Facebook page for lots of info and updates on bees; and please remember to LIKE US: https://www.facebook.com/losangelesbeekeeping 

THE LATEST BUZZ:  

Thursday
May242018

Honey Bee Colony Losses 2017-2018: Preliminary Results

Written by The Bee Informed Partnership Team   May 23, 2018

Note: This is a preliminary analysis. Sample sizes and estimates are likely to change. A more detailed final report is being prepared for publication in a peer-reviewed journal at a later date.

Selina Bruckner1, Nathalie Steinhauer2, Karen Rennich2, S. Dan Aurell3, Dewey M. Caron4, James D. Ellis5, Anne Marie Fauvel2, Kelly Kulhanek2, Kristen  C. Nelson6, 7, Juliana Rangel3, Robyn Rose8,: Ramesh Sagili4, Garett P. Slater9, Robert Snyder10, Christopher A. Thoms6, James T. Wilkes11, Michael E. Wilson12, Dennis vanEngelsdorp2, Geoffrey R. Williams1

1Department of Entomology & Plant Pathology, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA
2Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA
3Department of Entomology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA
4Department of Horticulture, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA
5Department of Entomology & Nematology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
6Department of Forest Resources, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, USA
7Department of Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, USA
8Plant Protection & Quarantine, USDA APHIS, Riverdale, MD, USA
9Department of Entomology, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, USA
10Northern California Technology Transfer Team, Bee Informed Partnership, Oroville, CA, USA
11Department of Computer Science, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC, USA
12Department of Entomology & Plant Pathology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA

Corresponding Authors: dvane@umd.edu (DvE) & williams@auburn.edu (GRW)

The Bee Informed Partnership (http://beeinformed.org) recently conducted the twelfth annual survey of managed honey bee colony losses in the United States. This year, 4,794 beekeepers collectively managing 175,923 colonies in October 2017 provided validated survey responses. This represents 6.6% of the estimated 2.67 million managed honey-producing colonies in the nation (USDA, 2018).

During the 2017-2018 winter (1 October 2017 – 1 April 2018), an estimated 30.7% of managed colonies in the United States were lost (Fig. 1). This represents an increase of 9.5 percentage points over that of the previous year, and an increase of 2.8 percentage points over that of the 10-year average total winter colony loss rate of 27.9%.

Similar to previous years, backyard beekeepers lost more colonies in winter (46.3%) compared to those lost by sideline (38.0%) and commercial (26.4%) beekeepers. Backyard, sideline, and commercial beekeepers are defined as those managing 50 or fewer colonies, 51 – 500 colonies, and 501 or more colonies, respectively.

Interestingly, the self-reported ‘level of acceptable winter colony loss’ increased from 18.7% last year to 20.6% this year. Sixty-nine percent of responding beekeepers lost more of their colonies than deemed to be acceptable.

During the summer 2017 season (1 April 2017– 1 October 2017), an estimated 17.1% of managed colonies were lost in the U.S. This level is on par with summer colony loss estimates of 18.2% that were reported the previous year, and lower than the 20.9% average experienced by beekeepers since 2010-2011, when summer losses were first recorded by the Bee Informed Partnership.

For the entire survey period (1 April 2017 – 1 April 2018), beekeepers in the U.S. lost an estimated 40.1% of their managed honey bee colonies. This is 2.7 percentage points greater than the average annual rate of loss experienced by beekeepers since 2010-2011. Fig 1. Total winter colony loss rate in the United States across years of the Bee Informed Partnership’s National Honey Bee Colony Loss Survey (yellow bars; 1 October – 1 April)1. Total annual loss estimates (orange bars) include total winter and summer (1 April – 1 October) losses; the latter has been estimated since 2010-2011 only. The acceptable winter loss rate (grey bars) is the average percentage of acceptable winter colony loss declared by the survey participants in each year of the survey.

1 Previous survey results estimated total winter colony loss values of 21% in the winter of 2016-17, 27% in 2015-16, 22% in 2014-15, 24% in 2013-14, 30% in 2012-13, 22% in 2011-12, 30% in 2010-11, 32% in 2009-10, 29% in 2008-09, 36% in 2007-08, and 32% in 2006-07 (see reference list).

References

Kulhanek, K; Steinhauer, N; Rennich, K; Caron, DM; Sagili, RR; Pettis, JS; Ellis, JD; Wilson, ME; Wilkes, JT; Tarpy, DR; Rose, R; Lee, K; Rangel, J; vanEngelsdorp, D (2017) A national survey of managed honey bee 2015-2016 annual colony losses in the USA. Journal of Apicultural Research 56: 328-340.

Lee, KV; Steinhauer, N; Rennich, K; Wilson, ME; Tarpy, DR; Caron, DM; Rose, R; Delaplane, KS; Baylis, K; Lengerich, EJ; Pettis, J; Skinner, JA; Wilkes, JT; Sagili, R; vanEngelsdorp, D; for the Bee Informed Partnership (2015) A national survey of managed honey bee 2013–2014 annual colony losses in the USA. Apidologie 46: 292-305.

Seitz, N; Traynor, KS; Steinhauer, N; Rennich, K; Wilson, ME; Ellis, JD; Rose, R; Tarpy, DR; Sagili, RR; Caron, DM; Delaplane, KS; Rangel, J; Lee, K; Baylis, K; Wilkes, JT; Skinner, JA; Pettis, JS; vanEngelsdorp, D (2016) A national survey of managed honey bee 2014-2015 annual colony losses in the USA. Journal of Apicultural Research 54: 292-304.

Spleen, AM; Lengerich, EJ; Rennich, K; Caron, D; Rose, R; Pettis, JS; Henson, M; Wilkes, JT; Wilson, M; Stitzinger, J; Lee, K; Andree, M; Snyder, R; vanEngelsdorp, D (2013) A national survey of managed honey bee 2011-12 winter colony losses in the United States: results from the Bee Informed Partnership. Journal of Apicultural Research 52: 44-53.

Steinhauer, N; Rennich, K; Caron, DM; Ellis, JD; Koenig, P; Kulhanek, K; Klepps, J; Lee, K; Milbrath, M; Range; J; Rose, R; Sagili, RR; Sallmann, B; Skinner, J; Snyder, R; Topitzhofer, E; Wilkes, JT; Wilson, ME; Williams, GR; Wyns, D; vanEngelsdorp, D (2017) Honey Bee Colony Losses 2016-2017. Preliminary Results. https://beeinformed.org/results/colony-loss-2016-2017-preliminary-results/ (Accessed 20 May 2019).

Steinhauer, NA; Rennich, K; Wilson, ME; Caron, DM; Lengerich, EJ; Pettis, JS; Rose, R; Skinner, JA; Tarpy, DR; Wilkes, JT; vanEngelsdorp, D (2014) A national survey of managed honey bee 2012-2013 annual colony losses in the USA: results from the Bee Informed Partnership. Journal of Apicultural Research 53: 1- 18.

USDA (2018) National Agricultural Statistics Service – Honey Report. http://usda.mannlib.cornell.edu/MannUsda/viewDocumentInfo.do?documentID=1191 (Accessed May 16, 2018).

vanEngelsdorp, D; Caron, D; Hayes, J; Underwood, R; Henson, M; Rennich, K; Spleen, A; Andree, M; Snyder, R; Lee, K; Roccasecca, K; Wilson, M; Wilkes, J; Lengerich, E; Pettis, J (2012) A national survey of managed honey bee 2010-11 winter colony losses in the USA: results from the Bee Informed Partnership. Journal of Apicultural Research 51: 115-124.

vanEngelsdorp, D; Hayes, J; Underwood, RM; Caron, D; Pettis, J (2011) A survey of managed honey bee colony losses in the USA, fall 2009 to winter 2010. Journal of Apicultural Research 50: 1-10.

vanEngelsdorp, D; Hayes, J; Underwood, RM; Pettis, J (2008) A Survey of Honey Bee Colony Losses in the U.S., Fall 2007 to Spring 2008. PLoS ONE 3: e4071.

vanEngelsdorp, D; Hayes, J; Underwood, RM; Pettis, JS (2010) A survey of honey bee colony losses in the United States, fall 2008 to spring 2009. Journal of Apicultural Research 49: 7-14.

vanEngelsdorp, D; Underwood, R; Caron, D; Hayes, J (2007) An estimate of managed colony losses in the winter of 2006-2007: A report commissioned by the apiary inspectors of America. American Bee Journal 147: 599-603.

Tuesday
May222018

Jon Reese: Beekeeping in Scotland

(NOTE: Thank you to LACBA President, Jon Reese, for sharing his visit with members of the Newbattle Abbey Beekeeping Association, his visit to their apiary, and meeting the honey bees of Edinburgh, Scotland.)

Friday May 4, 2018

Kim and Jubin (Credit: Jon Reese)Bonnie and I ended our April vacation in Edinburgh, Scotland. I found there was a bee club in Edinburgh and Emailed them.  Kimberley Moore Ede responded to my email. She and Jubin Santra came and picked me up at my hotel in the Grass market square area and we went to their apiary that was a local churches property that also provides grounds for a local flower shop to grow flowers for use in their business.  Their apiary is in an out building with mail slots (3) for the bees access to the landing boards as in the picture following.  We got to open their two hives and find one queen and evidence of another.  Spring buildup is just starting.  Their bees are the dark gentle European/German bee or possibly a cross with the Scottish Black Bee.  A Candid shot of Kim & Jubin.

Then we went to their club apiary (Newbattle Abbey Beekeeping Association) which has the 4 slot apiary building above with outside hives also, the last picture.  I met their president Myriam Baete, and members David Hennessey and Malcolm Evans. Their 5 members and I sat down and had an exchange of bee customs, practices and procedures of our two clubs.  We had coffee tea and cookies which seem to be universal.





Bee Equipment storage. (Credit: Jon Reese)

Bee Equipment Storage (Credit: Jon Reese)

Bee suit room. (Credit: Jon Reese)

Their club offers bee classes.  The fee for the year-long course is £270/year and that includes one ‘foster’ hive to manage with a mentor, use all the equipment, suit, gloves, hive tools, smoker but not boots they use wellies or the rubber high top boots as it can be wet in Edinburgh.  The student is taken through a year of beekeeping and at the end a pretty rigorous test (Basic Beemaster).  All members have passed with distinction, the youngest of whom was 10.  Annual fees for the club are £10/year.

We compared the number of club members 40 and 400 and all of us were awed at the thought of being in that position.  EBC can and does teach queen rearing as one of the skills in the first year class.  I remarked, I wish we could and went on to tell of our Africanized condition of our feral colonies and the low percentage of gentle queens that would be the result of mating in our area.

We spoke a lot of varroa and their treatments are the same as ours.  They have screened bottom boards that can be closed off and make use of sticky boards or unsticky to count mite drop for mite monitoring.   

I had a great time and thanks to Kim and Jubin for taking the time to pick me up and escort me around and the others for their time.  They have a solid program.  They rent a building and the outside space you see from Newbattle Abbey College for one pound a year on a ten year lease and their new Bee Academy opens soon.  They are working on incorporating their beekeeping classes into a curriculum at the college and like Mark Haag and Pomona and Mark at Pierce College, they have an inside professor to open doors for this to happen. 

Myriam and David working hives in Edinburgh Club Bee yard moderately gentle black/brown bees…well just one chased us.  Malcolm was the only one hard at work on the scheduled tasks, weeding and cleaning up the grounds (sorry Malcolm, no pictorial evidence).   Again, that you to the Newbattle Bee Association Malcolm, David, Myriam Kimberly and Jubin for their time and effort.  Edinburgh is in good hands.

http://newbattlebees.co.uk/

Monday
May212018

AB-2062 State highways: landscaping. (2017-2018)

AB-2062 State highways: landscaping. (2017-2018)

AMENDED IN SENATE  APRIL 30, 2018

AMENDED IN ASSEMBLY   MARCH 12, 2018

CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE - 2017-2018 REBULAR SESSION

ASSEMBLY BILL

Introduced by Assembly Member Maienschein
(Coauthors: Assembly Members Acosta, Friedman, Gallagher, and Lackey

February 07, 2018

An act to amend Section 92.3 of the Streets and Highways Code, relating to state highways.

LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST

AB 2062, as amended, Maienschein. State highways: landscaping.

Existing law provides that the Department of Transportation has full possession and control of all state highways and associated property, and sets forth the powers and duties of the department with respect to the operation, maintenance, and improvement of state highways. Existing law authorizes the department to enter into an agreement to accept funds, materials, equipment, or services from any person for maintenance or roadside enhancement of a section of a state highway. Existing law requires the department to discontinue further water intensive freeway landscaping and to use drought resistant landscaping whenever feasible, taking into consideration specified factors.

This bill would require planting projects undertaken or approved by the department to include, when appropriate, appropriate and consistent with integrated pest management strategies, California native wildflowers and native and climate-appropriate vegetation as an integral and permanent part of the planting design, with priority given to those species of wildflower and native and climate-appropriate vegetation that will help rebuild pollinator populations.

DIGEST KEY

Vote: majority   Appropriation: no   Fiscal Committee: yes   Local Program: no  


BILL TEXT

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:

SECTION 1.

 Section 92.3 of the Streets and Highways Code is amended to read:

92.3.

 (a) The department shall do both of the following:

(1) Discontinue further water intensive freeway landscaping and use drought resistant landscaping whenever feasible, taking into consideration such factors as erosion control and fire retardant needs.

(2) Eliminate any dependency on imported water for landscaping as soon as practicable.

(b) The department shall require the use of recycled water for the irrigation of freeway landscaping when it finds and determines that all of the following conditions exist:

(1) The recycled water is of adequate quality and is available in adequate quantity for the proposed use.

(2) The proposed use of the recycled water is approved by the California regional water quality control board having jurisdiction.

(3) There is a direct benefit to the state highway program for the proposed use of recycled water.

(4) The recycled water is supplied by a local public agency or water public utility able to contract for delivery of water and the installation, maintenance, and repair of facilities to deliver the water.

(5) The installation of the water delivery facilities does not unreasonably increase any hazard to vehicles on the freeway or create unreasonable problems of highway maintenance and repair.

(c) In cooperation with local public agencies and water public utilities, the department shall permit local public agencies and water public utilities to place transmission lines for recycled water in freeway rights-of-way for use by the local public agencies and water public utilities to transmit recycled water to others, when to do so will promote a beneficial use of recycled water and that transmission does not unreasonably interfere with use of the freeway or unreasonably increase any hazard to vehicles on the freeway, subject to paragraphs (1) to (5), inclusive, of subdivision (b) and the following additional requirements:

(1) The local public agency or water public utility holds the department harmless for any liability caused by a disruption of service to other users of the recycled water and will defend the department in any resulting legal action and pay any damages awarded as a result of that disruption.

(2) The department, in cooperation with the local public agency or water public utility, may temporarily interrupt service in order to add to or modify its facilities without liability, as specified in paragraph (1).

(3) The local public agency or water public utility obtains and furnishes the department an agreement by all other users of recycled water from the transmission system holding the department harmless for any disruption in service.

(4) The local public agency or water public utility has furnished the department a list of other recycled water users and information on any backup system or other source of water available for use in case of a service disruption.

(5) The local public agency is responsible for the initial cost or any relocation cost of the recycled water transmission lines for service to other users in the right-of-way and waives its rights to require the department to pay the relocation costs pursuant to Sections 702 and 704.

(6) The local public agency or water public utility maintains the water transmission system subject to reasonable access for maintenance purposes to be negotiated between the department and the local public agency or water public utility.

(7) The department has first priority with respect to the recycled water supply contracted for by the department.

(8) The local public agency or water public utility installs an automatic control system which will allow the water transmission system to be shut down in case of an emergency. The department shall have access to all parts of the transmission system for purposes of the agreement.

(9) All transmission lines are placed underground and as close as possible to the freeway right-of-way boundary or at other locations authorized by the department.

(10) The plans and specifications for the recycled water transmission facilities have been approved by the department prior to construction.

(d) When appropriate, appropriate and consistent with integrated pest management strategies as defined in subdivision (d) of Section 14717 of the Government Code, planting projects undertaken or approved by the department shall include California native wildflowers and native and climate-appropriate vegetation as an integral and permanent part of the planting design, with priority given to those species of wildflowers and native and climate-appropriate vegetation that will help rebuild pollinator populations.

(e) As used in this section:

(1) “Local public agency” means any local public agency that transmits or supplies recycled water to others.

(2) “Water public utility” means any privately owned water corporation that is subject to the jurisdiction and control of the Public Utilities Commission.

https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=201720180AB2062

BILL ANALYSIS:

SENATE COMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION AND HOUSING
Senator Jim Beall, Chair
2017 - 2018 Regular

Bill No:  AB 2062          Hearing Date:  5/15/18
Author:  Maienschein
Version: 4/30/2018
Urgency: No                  Fiscal:  Yes
Consultant:  Manny Leon

SUBJECT:  State highways: landscaping

DIGEST: This bill requires the Department of Transportation (Caltrans) to include California native wildflowers and climate-appropriate vegetation in planting projects, as specified.

ANALYSIS:

Existing law:

1) Provides that Caltrans has full possession and control of all state highways and associated property.

2) Authorizes Caltrans to take any act necessary, convenient, or proper for the construction, improvement, maintenance, or use of all highways within its jurisdiction.

3) Requires Caltrans, where practical or desirable, to replace trees that have been destroyed or removed because of projects undertaken to widen the highway.

4) Requires Caltrans to use drought resistant landscaping along freeways whenever feasible, taking into consideration such factors as erosion control and fire retardant needs.

This bill:

1) Requires Caltrans, when appropriate, to include California native wildflowers and native and climate-appropriate vegetation in planting projects.

2) Provides that a priority shall be given to those species of wildflowers that will help rebuild pollinator populations.

COMMENTS:

1) Purpose. According to the author, “Honeybees and pollinators alike are vital to the success of California’s agricultural industry and play an important role in our daily lives. One in every three bites of food consumed around the world depends on pollination, in particular bee pollination. We must secure California’s bee population to ensure the future success and well-being of our state. There is no single cause for the decline of our bee populace; however, the increase of foraging opportunities is one solution that will promote pollinator health year-round. California’s highway landscape is the perfect place to increase pollinator friendly vegetation to increase pollinator foraging opportunities.”

2) Existing requirements. Highway landscaping requirements currently exist in both Caltrans’ Highway Design Manual and Maintenance Manual. Specifically, the highway design manual notes in chapter 900, “planting and irrigation design should minimize ongoing intensive maintenance activities” and specifies conserving water by “using regionally appropriate drought tolerate native and non-native plants that will require little or no supplemental water… select and arrange regionally appropriate drought tolerant native and non-native plants to be visually and culturally compatible with local indigenous plant communities and the surrounding landscape.”

3) Pollinators. Pollinators, specifically the honey bee, are essential to the agricultural industry of our state and nation. In the United States, bees pollinate crops valued at more than $15 billion per year including many varieties of fruits, vegetables, and plants such as alfalfa and clover to feed cattle and other grazing animals. The author asserts that California’s bee population has declined in recent years due to multiple factors including lack of foraging opportunity, parasitic infestation, and pesticide use. California must secure its bee population to ensure the future success and well-being of the state. While both the Highway Design Manual and Maintenance Manual do in fact contain similar landscaping requirements as provided in this bill, existing requirements are silent on placing a priority on wildflowers and native plants that would benefit pollinator populations when appropriate. This bill will provide that clarification.

FISCAL EFFECT: Appropriation: No Fiscal Com.: Yes Local: No

Assembly votes:

Floor: 68-0
Approps: 15-0
Trans: 13-0

POSITIONS: (Communicated to the committee before noon on Wednesday, May 9, 2018.)

SUPPORT:

California State Beekeepers Association

Center for Food Safety

Occidental Arts and Ecology Center

Pesticide Action Network North America

OPPOSITION:

None received.

-END-

 Bill Analysis

(NOTE: Funds raised throughout the year by the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association support the California State Beekeepers Association in bee research and legislation such as AB-2062. Thank you to Anastasia Butler, attorney for the Sustainable Law Group, PC for providing information re AB-2062.)

Sunday
May202018

It's the First World Bee Day

United Nations
World Bee Day
20 May

The value of bees

Bees and other pollinators, such as butterflies, bats and hummingbirds, are increasingly under threat from human activities.

Pollinators allow many plants, including many food crops, to reproduce. Not only do pollinators contribute directly to food security, but they are key to conserving biodiversity - a cornerstone of the Sustainable Development Goals. They also serve as sentinels for emergent environmental risks, signaling the health of local ecosystems.

Invasive insects, pesticides, land-use change and monocropping practices may reduce available nutrients and pose threats to bee colonies.

To raise awareness of the importance of pollinators, the threats they face and their contribution to sustainable development, the UN designated 20 May as World Bee Day.

Why this date?

20 May coincides with the birthday of Anton Janša, who in the 18th century pioneered modern beekeeping techniques in his native Slovenia and praised the bees for their ability to work so hard, while needing so little attention.

http://www.un.org/en/events/beeday/

RELATED:

euronews    By Louise Miller     May 20, 2018

Sunday the 20th of May 2018 is the first World Bee day.

It was created last year by the UN General Assembly, after Slovenia initiated the idea, to focus on the essential role of bees and other pollinators in keeping the planet healthy.

Bee keepers from around the globe will work towards having the insects declared as an endangered species.

The stripy pollinators are declining every year largely due to human activity.

There are calls for modern intensive farming methods to be have more of a sustainable approach.

Threats include habitat loss, climate change, toxic pesticides and disease.

A third of the world’s food production is estimated to be dependent on the yellow and black creatures and other pollinators

Why we need bees:

- bees pollinate as many as 170,000 species of plants

- 80 percent of domestic fruit and vegetable varieties need them to ensure a good harvest

- Every third spoonful of food we eat is dependent on pollination

The brightly coloured insects don't just make honey. They're the largest pollinators in the world.

They're worth a tidy sum.

- economic worth of bees worldwide is 265 billion euros per year

- and 22 billion euros in Europe

An EU court upheld on Thursday (17 May 2018) a partial ban on three insecticides, saying that the European Commission had been right in 2013 to restrict their use to protect bees.

A German supermarket in Hannover emptied its shelves of pollinated products to show the significance if bees died out.

60 percent of the shelves remained empty.

http://www.euronews.com/2018/05/20/it-s-the-first-world-bee-day

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Bee_Day

Wednesday
May162018

LACBA Beekeeping Class 101 - #4: May 20, 2018, 9AM-Noon, at The Valley Hive

The Los Angeles County Beekeeping Association Beekeeping Class 101: Class #4
will meet at The Valley Hive bee yard located at 9633 Baden Avenue, Chatsworth, CA
from 9am-Noon this Sunday, May 20, 2018.


TOPIC: What Have You Learned So Far?
Assessing a Hive Before You Open the Lid
What to Look for During an Inspection
Understanding the Life Cycle of a Honeybee
Caste System of a Colony
Identifying Eggs, Larvae, Brood, and Honey

MEET AT OUR BEE YARD AT 9633 BADEN AVENUE.
Please be prompt - class is this Sunday at 9am.  
Please respect our neighbors.
We are guests on this property, and we are a very large group. 
Limited parking is available inside the gate and also on Baden Avenue.
The bee yard is located off a dirt road; a short walk up a hill from the parking lot. 

PROPER ATTIRE IS A MUST!
Full suit with veil and gloves are required to attend class.
Closed shoes/boots are required.
Bring bottled water.
Bring your own labeled tools, smoker, and smoker fuel  for a chance to receive more hands-on learning opportunities.

NEED SUPPLIES? Our store is located at 10538 Topanga Cyn, and it will open at 8am in case you need to purchase any last minute supplies.

REFRESHMENTS!
You are invited back to our Topanga location for refreshments and will have an opportunity to ask any questions you may have regarding your personal hive. 

If you have any last minute questions or concerns, you can contact The Valley Hive at (818) 280-6500 or via email at info@thevalleyhive.com. 

See you in class!
The Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association
The Valley Hive

https://mailchi.mp/a0d6563b557e/beekeeping-101-class-3-is-this-sunday-1451045