LAST WEEKEND FOR THE LA COUNTY FAIR - FUN, FUN, FUN AT THE BEE BOOTH!

LA County Fair 2019 logo 320.jpg

LAST WEEKEND FOR THE LA COUNTY FAIR!

Pomona Fairgrounds
1101 West McKinley Avenue
Pomona, CA 91768
(The Bee Booth is located across from the “Big Red Barn”)
https://www.lacountyfair.com/

Fair Runs August 30 - September 22, 2019
(Closed Mondays & Tuesdays)
Fair Times & Schedule

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LA County Fair Bee Booth 2019 - Catch the Buzz About Bees!

Catch the Buzz About Bees at the Bee Booth at the LA County Fair. Honey bees are one of the most fascinating creatures on the planet. Step inside the bee booth and you'll hear the 'buzz of the bees'. Peer inside our live observation hive for an exciting look at what goes on inside a beehive. Our experienced beekeepers will explain how bees communicate through sent and the 'waggle dance,' how they travel for miles to gather nectar to make honey, learn about the different jobs worker bees do, the duties of the drones, and how a bee becomes a queen. See if YOU CAN FIND THE QUEEN!

The exquisite macro-photography of Kodua Galieti shows the amazing intricacies of bees.

Come, meet the bees!

[Many thanks to Lia @OlivewoodBees Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/olivewoodbees/ for this wonderful video peek inside the Los Angeles County Fair Bee Booth!]

THE BEE BOOTH’S-A-BUZZING!

a sweet welcome!

a sweet welcome!

CONGRATULATIONS! FIRST TO FIND THE QUEEN TODAY!

CONGRATULATIONS! FIRST TO FIND THE QUEEN TODAY!

EXCITEMENT IN THE BEE BOOTH!

EXCITEMENT IN THE BEE BOOTH!

SWEET HONEY IN THE COOL MIST!

SWEET HONEY IN THE COOL MIST!

2 WEEKENDS LEFT FOR THE LA COUNTY FAIR!

LA County Fair 2019 logo 480.jpg

Pomona Fairgrounds
1101 West McKinley Avenue
Pomona, CA 91768
(The Bee Booth is located across from the “Big Red Barn”)
https://www.lacountyfair.com/

Fair Runs August 30 - September 22, 2019
(Closed Mondays & Tuesdays)
Fair Times & Schedule for the General Public

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for the LA County Fair Bee Booth (LACBA & BASC Members)

LACBA/BASC Members
Volunteers Are Needed
at the
Los Angeles County Fair Bee Booth

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Message from Cynthia Alvarado
Bee Booth Chair Person

Hello Fellow Members/Beekeepers:
We have 2 weekends left in the 2019 Fair Season.  I want to thank all the members that have come to support and continue to participate in the event.  The public greatly appreciate the information that you provide to educate them about bees and beekeeping.

Your volunteer participation is greatly needed at:

The Observation Hive
To Educate Others

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This is a great opportunity for new beekeepers (especially those who attended our LACBA Beekeeping Class 101) to share the information you acquired about bees and beekeeping with the general public. Come out and meet your fellow beekeepers and you’ll learn more than you ever dreamed possible by sharing your knowledge with others.

The Honey Table

Proceeds from honey sales go to benefit the bees through honey bee education and research.

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There are still 8 days left of the fair and many spots need to be filled.  Check your email - Your E-vite came through Sign-up.com (Copy Los Angeles fair). Review the Schedule for the dates that do not say Full, and please Sign-up. If you did not receive your E-vite, check your spam. If you don’t have the E-vite, call me (323) 243-0756 and I will be happy to resend or help you schedule a day and shift time.

Come, be a part of helping the honey bees.

Thank you,
Cindy

Invasive Honeybee-Eating Hornets With Toxic Sting Found On Vancouver Island For First Time

Peninsula News Review Nanaimo News Staff September 11, 2019

The B.C. Ministry of Agriculture says three insects found in Nanaimo in August have been confirmed to be Asian giant hornets. (Submitted photo)

The B.C. Ministry of Agriculture says three insects found in Nanaimo in August have been confirmed to be Asian giant hornets. (Submitted photo)

Invasive honeybee-eating hornets with stings that can be toxic have been found on Vancouver Island for the first time, says the B.C. government.

According to a B.C. Ministry of Agriculture press release, three large insects, Asian giant hornets, were found in Nanaimo, on central Vancouver Island, in August. They are well-known to prey on honeybees and are capable of destroying hives in a short time period. However, the hornets are dormant and unlikely to be seen in the autumn and winter months, the press release said.

People who encounter an Asian giant hornet nest are asked not to disturb it, said the ministry.

“Asian giant hornets do not seek out human food and feed on insects only,” the press release said. “If a nest of hornets is encountered, do not disturb the nest or the hornets and leave the area. Stings are rare, but may occur if their nest is disturbed. Due to the larger amount of venom injected, a sting from an Asian giant hornet can be very painful and cause localized swelling, redness and itching.”

The ministry recommends that people who are stung by the hornet compress ice or a cold pack on the affected area in order to reduce inflammation and stop the venom from spreading. People are asked not to rub the wound, as that will lead to the venom moving to surrounding tissue, the ministry said.

The press release also warned that people who are stung 10 times or more are at risk of developing toxic or allergic reactions, which can include dizziness. If this occurs, seek immediate medical help, the ministry said.

The ministry is investigating how it can assist beekeepers with surveillance and trapping equipment in the spring, should other hornets emerge from their dormancy or be introduced to the area.

Asian giant hornets are large-headed and can be orange, yellow and brown in colour, said the ministry. Worker hornets are about 3.5 centimetres in length, while queens are known to be four to five cm in length, with a wingspan between four to seven cm, it said.

To find out more about the effects of insect stings, click here.

People who think they’ve come across the hornets can contact the Invasive Species Council of B.C. at 1-888-933-3722, through the council’s Report Invasives mobile phone app or at www.bcinvasives.ca/report.

https://www.peninsulanewsreview.com/news/invasive-honeybee-eating-hornets-with-toxic-sting-found-on-vancouver-island-for-first-time/?fbclid=IwAR2vS06LfX0PyMa66-X2X49hNrPBwePXEljQSXRzx7rrFWdHJGH10idQE7s

Study Shows Bee Brains Process Positive and Negative Experiences Differently

Phys.org By Bob Yirka September 11, 2019

Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Credit: CC0 Public Domain

A team of researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has found that when bees experience positive versus negative events, their brains process and remember the events differently. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of bee brain processing and memory retention and what they found.

Scientists have known for a long time that vertebrates handle positive and negative events differently, storing and retrieving those memories in their brains differently, as well. In this effort, the researchers wanted to know if the same could be said of invertebrates such as the common honeybee. To find out, they exposed test bees to positive or negative events and then studied gene expression in a part of their brain known as the mushroom body—an area involved in processing sensory information, learning and memory.

More specifically, the researchers exposed the bees to positive experiences such as tending to their young or negative experiences such as dealing with a threat like an enemy or a predator. They then quickly froze the bees to keep the brain chemical state intact. Next, they studied the brain chemistry related to gene expression in samples taken from the mushroom bodies, focusing on genes that prior research has shown respond very quickly to external stimuli. The team then looked for differences in other parts of the mushroom bodies after the bee had been exposed to a positive or negative event. They report that they did find differences between the two, which, they suggest, indicates that bee brains process and store memories of the two types of events differently. The researchers were surprised by the results, considering the very small size of the bee brain.

The researchers suggest their findings could lead to a better understanding of social behavior in invertebrates and how they respond to different sorts of stimuli. They also note that because of the two types of memory involved in the two types of events, there is a link between vertebrate and invertebrate cognition despite the two groups diverging approximately 600 million years ago.

More information: Ian M. Traniello et al. Valence of social information is encoded in different subpopulations of mushroom body Kenyon cells in the honeybee brain, Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences (2019). DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2019.0901

Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B

https://phys.org/news/2019-09-bee-brains-positive-negative-differently.html

Related: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-09-brain-function-impacts-contribute-depression.html

The Asian Hornet

This week there were three talks about the Asian hornet at Apimondia 2019 at Montreal, Canada.

Photo: Vespa velutina. Courtesy of The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA). Crown Copyright - Jean Haxaire.

Photo: Vespa velutina. Courtesy of The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA). Crown Copyright - Jean Haxaire.

Prof. Stephen Martin (Salford University, UK) talking about Asian hornet biology at the OIE (World Organisation for Animal Health) symposium at Apimondia 2019 at Montréal, Canada

Prof. Stephen Martin (Salford University, UK) talking about Asian hornet biology at the OIE (World Organisation for Animal Health) symposium at Apimondia 2019 at Montréal, Canada

Carreck Consultancy LTD Facebook Post dated September 11, 2019: https://www.facebook.com/CarreckBees/.
“Prof. Stephen Martin (Salford University, UK) talking about Asian hornet biology at the OIE (World Organisation for Animal Health) symposium at Apimondia 2019 at Montréal, Canada. There were three talks about the Asian hornet in Europe and in South Korea. Much useful discussion took place on new tracking methods and experiments aimed at better understanding the biology and spread of the pest.

This comes against the background of a new confirmed finding yesterday of a single Asian hornet near Ashford, Kent, some considerable distance from previous findings. The Defra Asian hornet page with details of all previous sightings is here: https://www.gov.uk/…/news/asian-hornet-uk-sightings-in-2018…

Further information about the Asian hornet can be found here:
http://www.nationalbeeunit.com/index.cfm?sectionid=117

Prof. Martin’s book “The Asian hornet - threats, biology and expansion” can be purchased from the IBRA website: http://www.ibrabee.org.uk/component/k2/item/3634

The book “The Asian hornet handbook” by Sarah Bunker can be purchased from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Asian-Hornet-Handbook…/…/ref=sr_1_1?

If you think you may have seen an Asian hornet, you should visit the UK Non-Native species Secretariat website: http://www.nonnativespecies.org/alerts/index.cfm where there is an identification guide and app for your phone and information on where to report it.

Next week 9th - 15th September is the British Beekeepers Association Asian Hornet week. Further details can be found on the BBKA website: https://www.bbka.org.uk/2019-asian-hornet-week

And further information about the Asian hornet can be found here:

http://www.nonnativespecies.org/alerts/index.cfm?id=4

https://www.bbka.org.uk/pages/faqs/category/asian-hornet-faq


Invasive Asian Giant Hornets Gound on Vancouver Island

CTV News Staff / Vancouver Island September 11, 2019

While Asian giant hornet stings are rare, the large volume of venom they carry can cause localized swelling, redness, itchiness and significant pain. (BC government)

While Asian giant hornet stings are rare, the large volume of venom they carry can cause localized swelling, redness, itchiness and significant pain. (BC government)

For the first time ever, Asian giant hornets have been discovered on Vancouver Island.

The invasive species was found in the Nanaimo area in August, according to the Ministry of Agriculture, sparking concern for honeybee populations on the island.

Asian giant hornets are known to feed on honeybees and other large insects and are capable of destroying a beehive in a short time, according to the province.

The Ministry of Agriculture says it is already at work investigating how it can assist Vancouver Island beekeepers with hive surveillance and with trapping the invasive hornets in the spring.

While three Asian giant hornets were found in Nanaimo this summer, the province is unsure if more will appear next year as the large insect lies dormant during the fall and winter seasons.

Anyone who sees one of these types of hornets is asked to contact the Invasive Species Council of B.C. at 1-888-933-3722 or file a report through the government's "Report Invasives" mobile phone app found here.

According to the province, the hornets make their nests in the ground and not in trees or buildings. If people stumble upon a nest, officials recommend that they avoid it and leave the area.

While Asian giant hornet stings are rare, the large volume of venom they carry can cause localized swelling, redness, itchiness and significant pain.

If stung, the province recommends that people treat it as they would a regular bee or wasp sting by placing an ice pack or cold compress on the sting to reduce inflammation and the spread of venom. Avoid rubbing the sting as it can cause the venom to spread into surrounding tissue.

The province warns that if people are stung 10 or more times they are at a higher risk of developing toxic or allergic reactions, such as dizziness or headaches. Anyone who feels like they are developing these symptoms should seek medical attention immediately.

https://vancouverisland.ctvnews.ca/invasive-asian-giant-hornets-found-on-vancouver-island-1.4589009


Asian Hornets Attack and Brutally Kill Bees!

BBC Earth Unplugged Published August 9, 2018

European bees are defenceless against the killer Asian Hornets, and even humans need to look out.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QzeDskBHl8U

Male Honeybees Inject Queens With Blinding Toxins During Sex

SciTechDaily University of California Riverside By Jules Bernstein September 10, 2019

Queen honeybee in a hive. Credit: Barbara Baer-Imhoff / UCR


Queen honeybee in a hive. Credit: Barbara Baer-Imhoff / UCR

They say love is blind, but if you’re a queen honeybee it could mean true loss of sight.

New research finds male honeybees inject toxins during sex that cause temporary blindness. All sexual activity occurs during a brief early period in a honeybee’s life, during which males die and queens can live for many years without ever mating again.

UC Riverside’s Boris Baer, a professor of entomology, said males develop vision-impairing toxins to maximize the one fleeting opportunity they may ever get to father offspring.

“The male bees want to ensure their genes are among those that get passed on by discouraging the queen from mating with additional males,” said Baer, senior author of the study that discovered these blinding findings published today in the journal eLife. “She can’t fly if she can’t see properly.”

The toxins identified by the team are proteins contained in male bees’ seminal fluid, which is a substance that helps maintain sperm. Earlier work by Baer’s team also discovered honeybee seminal fluid toxins that kill the sperm of rivals. All honeybees make these proteins, though some may make more of it than others.

Baer first became interested in bees’ seminal fluid years ago as a doctoral student. During early projects, he noticed that if bumblebee queens were injected only with the fluid and not the sperm during insemination, the queens stopped mating and became increasingly aggressive toward males. He wanted to understand why.

Roughly 10 years ago, Baer and his international team began analyzing which proteins could be found in honeybees’ fluids.

“We found at least 300 of these ‘James Bonds,’ little secret agents with specific missions,” he said.

It isn’t easy being queen. Queens can mate with as many as 90 males during a single, brief mating flight. Credit: Markus Imhoff / UCR


It isn’t easy being queen. Queens can mate with as many as 90 males during a single, brief mating flight. Credit: Markus Imhoff / UCR

The team was not entirely surprised to find a protein that attacks the sperm of other males, as this behavior can be found in other insects. But they were surprised to find the protein that impacts genes responsible for vision in the queen’s brains.

To test whether the protein had this effect, Baer’s team presented inseminated queens with a flickering light, and measured her response to it via tiny electrodes in her brain. The vision and corresponding flight-impairing effects kick in within hours, but Baer notes that it is likely reversible in the long term because queens do tend to fly successfully later in life when they establish new colonies.

Studying the seminal fluid proteins required an interdisciplinary team of entomologists, biologists, biochemists, and more to identify them and examine their effects on the queens.

This team included Baer’s wife and co-author, Barbara Baer-Imhoof, a UC Riverside pollination specialist. As part of this project, Baer-Imhoof conducted experiments in which she installed tiny tags on queen bees’ backs read by scanners at the hive entrances.

“The tags were similar to those at the self-checkout counter in grocery stores,” Baer-Imhoof said. The experiment showed queens had difficulties finding their way back to their colonies if they had been inseminated.

A molecular understanding of honeybee mating habits could eventually be used to improve breeding programs and help insects that pollinate many of the foods we eat.

“More than a third of what we eat depends on bee pollination, and we’ve taken bees’ services for granted for a very long time,” Baer said. “However, bees have experienced massive die-offs in the last two decades. Anything we can do to help improve their numbers will benefit humans, too.”

Reference: “Seminal fluid compromises visual perception in honeybee queens reducing their survival during additional mating flights” by Joanito Liberti, Julia Görner, Mat Welch, Ryan Dosselli, Morten Schiøtt, Yuri Ogawa, Ian Castleden, Jan M Hemmi, Barbara Baer-Imhoof, Jacobus J Boomsma, and Boris Baer, 10 September 2019, eLife.
DOI: doi.org/10.7554/eLife.45009

https://scitechdaily.com/male-honeybees-inject-queens-with-blinding-toxins-during-sex/

2019 North American 2019 Mite-A-Thon Date Extension

Mite-A-Thon is a tri-national effort to collect mite infestation data and to visualize Varroa infestations in honey bee colonies across North America within a two week window. All beekeepers can participate, creating a rich distribution of sampling sites in Canada, the United States, and Mexico. Their Varroa monitoring data will be uploaded to www.mitecheck.com.

The parasitic mite, Varroa destructor (Varroa), and the viruses it vectors is a significant driver of this honey bee colony mortality. Yet, indicators suggest that many beekeepers are not monitoring honey bee colony Varroa infestations and therefore not able to connect infestation to colony loss.

OBJECTIVE: 1) To raise awareness about honey bee colony Varroa infestations in North America through effective monitoring methods. 2) Management strategies will be made available for discussion within bee organizations utilizing Mite-A-Thon partner developed information and outreach materials.

DATE: Starting the week of September 7, 2019, with a practice test during summer 2019

PARTICIPANTS: All beekeepers in North America are encouraged to participate

COST: There is no cost. You can create your own test materials or kits can be purchased online and at your local bee supply store.

OUTREACH: Promotion of Mite-A-Thon will be through local bee clubs, state beekeeping organizations, and national associations (see partners for examples)

DATA COLLECTION: Participants will monitor the level of mites (number of mites per 100 bees) using a standardized protocol utilizing two common methods of assessment (alcohol wash or powdered sugar roll) and then enter data, including location, total number of hives, number of hives tested, local habitat, and the number of Varroa mites counted from each hive. The published information will not identify individual participants.

SPONSORS: Sponsorships are being solicited to underwrite costs and grants, as necessary.

CONTACT: Miteathon@pollinator.org or 415-362-1137

TO DO: Determine your preferred method of testing for mites and commit to a day for testing, either individually or through beekeeping organizations, and report your data (see above).

CLICK HERE for the 2017 and 2018 Mite-A-Thon Analysis Report.

Email miteathon@pollinator.org with any questions.

Partners:

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A special thanks to our Mite-A-Thon Sponsors:

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Come Find the Queen at the LA County Fair Bee Booth

LOS ANGELES COUNTY FAIR
August 30 - September 22, 2019

LA County Fair 2019 logo 480.jpg

Pomona Fairgrounds
1101 West McKinley Avenue
Pomona, CA 91768
(The Bee Booth is located across from the “Big Red Barn”)
https://www.lacountyfair.com/

Fair Runs August 30 - September 22, 2019
(Closed Mondays & Tuesdays)
Fair Times & Schedule for the General Public



The Bee Booth at the LA County Fair is all a buzz about bees this week. Nicole Medina, the 2019 American Honey Princess, has been busy teaching fair goers about honey bees. Come find out about the fascinating life inside a bee hive. You’ll learn about the different jobs bees have, about the worker bees, the drones, and the queen bee. Nicole will explain how bees communicate, forage for nectar and pollen, how bees make honey, and the importance honey bees play in our lives. Head over to the Bee Booth and see if YOU can FIND THE QUEEN!

2019 American Honey Princess, Nicole Medina, and Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association, President, Jon Reese.

2019 American Honey Princess, Nicole Medina, and Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association, President, Jon Reese.

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Scientists Use Honey and Wild Salmon to Trace Industrial Metals in the Enviroment

ScienceMag August 21, 2019

Credit: Dominique Weis

Credit: Dominique Weis

Scientists have combined analyses from honey and salmon to show how lead from natural and industrial sources gets distributed throughout the environment. By analysing the relative presence of differing lead isotopes in honey and Pacific salmon, Vancouver-based scientists have been able to trace the sources of lead (and other metals) throughout the region. Scientists in France, Belgium and Italy are now looking to apply the same approach to measure pollutants in honey in major European cities. The research* is being presented at the Goldschmidt conference in Barcelona.

Scientists have long known that honey bees pick up small amounts of metal elements (i.e., iron, zinc, and pollutants such as lead, and cadmium) when they alight on flowers and leaves. They carry these metals back to the hive where tiny amounts are incorporated into the honey. However, this is the first time researchers have been able to establish clearly the sources of the metals carried by the bees and their products, making them reliable biomarkers for environmental pollution.

“We’ve found that we can let the bees do the hard the work for us: they go to thousands of sites where metal-containing dust particulates might land, then bring samples back to a central hive. From there we can take the honey to have it analysed and begin to identify the source of pollutants like lead” said Ph.D. candidate Kate Smith, part of a team working at the Pacific Centre for Isotopic and Geochemical Research (University of British Columbia).

Once they have sampled the honey gathered by the bees, it is taken to a specialised geochemistry lab to be analysed using a high-resolution ICP-MS (Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) instrument. This allows scientists to distinguish between different types (isotopes) of certain metal pollutants, like lead.

Smith continued, “Looking at the lead isotopic composition of the honey samples, we can tell the difference between honey gathered in the city centre of Vancouver and honey gathered in rural areas. We see that the trace amounts of lead in urban honey samples contain higher 208Pb/206Pb ratios that have no local natural equivalent, indicating that they come from man-made sources like aging city infrastructure and fuel combustion (e.g. cars and ships). Lead ratios measured in rural honey, on the other hand, reflect those of natural sources, like the local geology or particulates from nearby forest fires.”

Presenting the work on salmon, postdoctoral researcher Dr. Miling Li added “This work with honeybees is mirrored in initial findings from shellfish and salmon. Juvenile salmon breed and live in remote freshwater ecosystems in British Columbia, and their lead composition reflects that found in nature, e.g. the nearby Garibaldi volcano range. Adult salmon that forage in the open ocean off the BC coast reveal isotopic compositions consistent with downtown Vancouver honeys. This indicates that Pacific salmons were exposed to lead during their sea life mostly from anthropogenic sources in the Northeast Pacific Ocean.”

Although we can identify the sources of lead, the lead concentrations in both the honey and salmon from Vancouver and the surrounding areas are extremely low and well below the reported world-wide average of lead in honey.

Following the proof of concept work in Metro Vancouver (and similar work in Australia, in Sydney and the site of the vast Broken Hill lead mines, the main source of lead added to gasoline in Europe, Asia and many other places in the world), the UBC team has now developed standardised protocols for measurement of lead isotopes in honey to apply the technique to other cities. Experiments are now being set up in Paris, Brussels, and Piacenza, with interest also coming from the U.S. Simultaneously, the UBC team is confirming the efficacy of the Vancouver honey data by monitoring topsoil and air quality near the hives.

Kate Smith said, “Honey is particularly useful because honeybees can be found pretty well everywhere, so we believe that using honey as a proxy measurement for lead pollution may become an important urban geochemistry and environmental tool. This means we need to make sure that we have a framework that gives results of consistent quality from year to year and city to city. This is what we are now testing.”

Research team leader Professor Dominique Weis said “Urban geochemistry has become an important discipline in understanding the spread of heavy metal pollutants in cities, as long as the natural background is well characterized. Lead isotopic analysis is a standard geochemical method that for decades provided a signal dominated by lead that was used as an additive in gasoline. Honey is an effective biomonitor, and allows us to identify the source of some pollutants even at very low levels; we think that this method could become an internationally accepted way of assessing metal sources and distribution in urban environments”.

Airborne lead pollution varies significantly from area to area. It is found naturally at low levels. Major sources of pollution are metal processing, incinerators, and other industrial processes. Lead in gasoline was banned in the 1990s in North America, which caused a significant decrease in airborne lead levels (98% in the USA). Depending on the level of exposure, lead can have significant health effects**.

Commenting, Professor Mark P Taylor***, Macquarie University, Australia, leader of the Australian group working on honey said,

“This research is emblematic of contemporary science because it touches on two emerging key public interests in an increasingly urbanised world: it examines environmental quality by way of assessing anthropogenic changes to trace element sources in the wider environment and it engages citizens directly through the collection and sharing of honey for geochemical analysis. Nothing could be sweeter for science.”

This is an independent comment; Professor Taylor was not involved in this work.

https://scienmag.com/scientists-use-honey-and-wild-salmon-to-trace-industrial-metals-in-the-environment/?fbclid=IwAR0zbMwynvYS6sGZdYdGS8ZQtkleI8Jw19Ub64BrYyprWC063kdDM_DcUYo

"Pollinators Under Pressure" Screens at McGinty's Gallery on Friday, September 6, 2019

McGinty’s Gallery
At The End Of The World
Presents Their First Annual Themed Show,
”Casa de la Mariposa”

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McGinty’s Gallery
At The End Of The World
869 E. Mariposa St.
Altadena, CA 91001
https://www.facebook.com/events/880742618971093/
Show runs September 6 - October 11, 2019

Opening Reception September 6th 6-10pm

Centering on butterflies and metamorphosis, the show features over 60 local artists.
Enjoy tacos by Sofia and live music by Artichoke.

With a Special Screening
of
Pollinators Under Pressure”
with executive producers Laura Cox and George DiCaprio

pollinators under pressure.jpg

Pollinators Under Pressure” is a short film (approx. 14 min.)

Narrated by Leonardo DiCaprio

Featuring: Dominic Monaghan, Michael A. Hill, Dr. Kimberly Winter, Sam Droege, Gunther Hauk, Laurie Davis Adams, Scott Hoffman Black, Josefina Navarro, Elvis Cordova, Emerson Hernandez, Juan Elizondo, Kala Price

(The screening is much less formal than a ticketed event. It will be in the alley behind the gallery around 8:30pm.
The main focus of the event - the visual art inside the gallery.)

For more info: https://www.facebook.com/events/880742618971093/

Come Meet the 2019 American Honey Princess at the LA County Fair Bee Booth!

LOS ANGELES COUNTY FAIR
August 30 - September 22, 2019

LA County Fair 2019 logo 320.jpg

Pomona Fairgrounds
1101 West McKinley Avenue
Pomona, CA 91768
(The Bee Booth is located across from the “Big Red Barn”)
https://www.lacountyfair.com/

Fair Runs August 30 - September 22, 2019
(Closed Mondays & Tuesdays)
Fair Times & Schedule for the General Public

Come Meet the 2019 American Honey Princess

2019 American Honey Princess Nicole Medina lacba .JPG

Nicole Medina
The American Beekeeping Federation
2019 American Honey Princess

Nicole Medina, the 2019 American Honey Princess, will visit Los Angeles, California, September 3-8, as part of her National Honey Month Tour.  She will be a guest of the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association at the Los Angeles County Fair, speaking to fair goers about the importance of honeybees to California agriculture and how honeybees drive the quantity and quality of our food.  She will also share information about the bonuses that honeybees provide beyond honey.  Nicole’s trip is sponsored by the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association.

Nicole is the daughter of Joel and Nolvia Medina of Green Township, New Jersey.  She is a sophomore at Sussex County Community College studying business administration.  Nicole has been keeping bees for five years with her family and is an active volunteer in the Sussex County Beekeepers Association. 

As the 2019 American Honey Princess, Nicole serves as a national spokesperson on behalf of the American Beekeeping Federation, a trade organization representing beekeepers and honey producers throughout the United States.  The American Honey Queen and Princess speak and promote in venues nationwide, and, as such Princess Nicole will travel throughout the United States in 2019.  Prior to being selected as the American Honey Princess, Nicole served as the 2018 New Jersey Honey Queen.  In this role, she promoted the honey industry at fairs, festivals, and farmers’ markets, via media interviews, and in schools. 

The beekeeping industry touches the lives of every individual in our country.  In fact, honeybees are responsible for nearly one-third of our entire diet, in regards to the pollination services that they provide for a large majority of fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes. This amounts to nearly $19 billion per year of direct value from honeybee pollination to United States agriculture.

The Bee Booth

Bee Booth at the LA County Fair.jpg

From August 30 through September 22, 2019, volunteer members of the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association and the Beekeepers Association of Southern California will be on hand at the Los Angeles County Fair Bee Booth educating thousands of school children and the general public about honeybees and the importance they play in our lives. The LA County Fair is one of the largest county fairs in the country and is the most-visited event in the Los Angeles region in September. It's an end-of-summer tradition for many.

The Observation Hive

LA County Fair Bee Booth Observation Hive.jpg

Gather round our fabulous HONEY BEE OBSERVATION HIVE.

See if you can FIND THE QUEEN!

Let us spark your interest in honey bees, their amazing lifestyle and social structure, how they help feed the world, how they have survived for millions of years.

HONEY! HONEY! HONEY!

LA County Fair Bee Booth Local Honey.jpg

Delicious pure, natural, 100% raw local honey direct from Los Angeles County beekeepers is available for purchase.

Pick up HONEY STIX in YUMMY flavors and vibrant colors.

Proceeds from honey sales go to Honey Bee Research.

Come catch the BUZZ ABOUT BEES at the Bee Booth!

Bees: How Important Are They and What Would Happen If They Were Extinct?

The Conversation - I Need to Know August 19, 2019

How important are bees and what will happen when they go extinct? Is there research into what is killing them? I’ve been told it’s weed killers… – Tink, aged 18, Cornwall, UK.

Bees – including honey bees, bumble bees and solitary bees – are very important because they pollinate food crops. Pollination is where insects move pollen from one plant to another, fertilising the plants so that they can produce fruit, vegetables, seeds and so on. If all the bees went extinct, it would destroy the delicate balance of the Earth’s ecosystem and affect global food supplies.

There are more than 800 wild bee species within Europe, seven of which are classified by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) as critically endangered. A further 46 are endangered, 24 are vulnerable and 101 are near threatened. While it’s unlikely that all bee species will be wiped out anytime soon, losing these threatened species would still have a big impact on pollination around the world, wiping out plant species, some of which we rely on for our food.


I Need To Know is a series by The Conversation, which gives teenagers the chance to have their questions about the world answered by experts. Send your questions – along with your first name, age and the area where you live – to ineedtoknow@theconversation.com, or find out more ways to get in touch at the end of this article.


But the problem goes far beyond bees. In fact, honeybees are responsible for only one third of crop pollination and a very small proportion of the wild plant pollination. There are a diverse range of other insects including butterflies, bumblebees and small flies that do the rest of the work – and it looks like these insects are in trouble too.

A bumblebee, pulling it’s weight. Emily L Brown, Author provided

A bumblebee, pulling it’s weight. Emily L Brown, Author provided

A recent study suggests that as many as 40% of the world’s insect species are in decline. Insects are facing extinction rates that are eight times higher than vertebrates. In Germany, scientists have recorded losses of up to 75% of the total mass of insects in protected areas.

These trends lead scientists to believe that about a third of all insect species – that’s nearly 2m – may be threatened with extinction. And that figure is growing by over 100,000 species every year. Yet hard data on threatened insect species is lacking, with only 8,000 records actually assessed by the IUCN.

Here’s a rundown of what scientists believe to be the top causes of declines in insect diversity and abundance.

Invasive species

Invasive predators, parasites and disease-causing bacteria called “pathogens” have been blamed for the collapse of honeybee colonies around the world.

Recently, the spread of the Asian Hornet in Europe has caused great concern. This species preys on honey bees, and a single hornet is capable of killing an entire hive.

There is some evidence that wild bees in North America have declined in the face of fungal and bacterial diseases.



Of course, in the past bees have coexisted with these pathogens. The fact that scientists have seen more bees lost to these diseases in recent times is probably linked with the bees’ increased exposure to pesticides, which can damage their immune systems.

Pesticides

Pollution – particularly from exposure to pesticides – is a key cause of pollinator decline. There are three types of chemical pesticide widely used in the UK: insecticides targeting insect pests, fungicides targeting fungal pathogens of crops and herbicides targeting weeds.

Insecticides contain chemicals that can kill pollinators, so they’re clearly a threat. But they may not be the greatest problem pollinators experience. Herbicides are actually used five times as much in farming as insecticides. These weed killers target a huge variety of the wild plants that bees need to forage.

Environmentally-friendly farming schemes recommend planting wildflower strips on the edge of crops, to provide safe refuge and food sources for pollinators. Yet drifting clouds of herbicide from growing fields can contaminate these wildflower strips.

Wildflowers border farmland in Sussex, UK.  Shutterstock.

Wildflowers border farmland in Sussex, UK. Shutterstock.

The most cutting-edge research suggests glyphosate (the most commonly used weed killer) can impact the gut microbes of bees, which can have devastating implications for their health.

Although exposure to herbicides and pesticides used by farmers is likely to be one of the main causes of pollinator decline, the chemicals used by city authorities and civilian gardeners might also be harming bees and other insects. So, for the bees’ sake, it’s best to avoid using them where possible.

Climate change

Global warming is believed to be a major driver of wild bee declines. Some wild bees can only survive in a narrow range of temperatures. As their habitats get warmer, the places where they can live grow smaller. For example, some might be forced to live at higher altitudes, where it’s cooler, reducing the space they have to live in.

Habitat destruction

The way land is farmed has been associated with declines in biodiversity and pollination. Farming destroys the kinds of spaces that bees use to nest, it takes away the diversity of food that bees use to forage on and it even has wider impacts on other animals like wild birds, mammals and amphibians.

While countless insect species are currently going extinct, those that remain are taking their place, so it’s unlikely that crops will stop being pollinated any time soon. Generalist species such as the buff-tailed bumblebee, the European honey bee and common small black flies, which can survive in a huge range of temperatures and conditions, will become the main species pollinating our food sources, while rarer, more specialist species will decline.

But as generalist species move in to take the place space left by the losses of specialists, and complex ecosystems become dominated by a couple of generalists, the whole system becomes far more susceptible to a single sudden change. Insects form the base of many intricate food webs, their decline will result in a complex cascade of impacts on vertebrates, threatening ecological stability.

https://theconversation.com/bees-how-important-are-they-and-what-would-happen-if-they-went-extinct-121272

The Conversation:

The Conversation.jpg

If you’re a teenager aged 12 to 18, and you’ve got questions you’d like an expert to answer, send them our way! Include your first name, age and the area you live in. To get in touch, you can:

We have a huge pool of experts at our fingertips, and we can’t wait to share their knowledge with you.

The Laborious Honey Bee

BugSquad By Kathy Keatley Garvey September 9, 2019

Today is Labor Day 2019, a federal holiday celebrated the first Monday of September.

However, "the girls" are working, as they do every day of the year, weather permitting.

"The girls" are the worker honey bees.

Unless you keep bees or have access to a hive, you mostly see them foraging. But inside the hive, they are also nurse maids, nannies, royal attendants, builders, architects, dancers, honey tenders, pollen packers, propolis or "glue" specialists, air conditioning and heating technicians, guards, and undertakers.

They ensure the survival of the hive, but their life span is short.

"Worker bees live for approximately five to six weeks in the spring and summer," writes author and retired bee scientist and bee wrangler Norman Gary, emeritus professor of entomology at the University of California, Davis, in his book, Honey Bee Hobbyist: The Care and Keeping of Bees."Those reared in the fall live for several months--long enough for the colony to survive the winter--and are replaced by young bees in late winter or early spring."

In peak season, a honey bee queen can lay 1500 to 2000 eggs a day, and most of them will be worker bees, the most needed of the three castes (queen, drone and worker) in the hive.  Although the smallest, but they do most of the work.  The queen is the egg layer. The drone's role is strictly reproduction.

Worker bees forage within four to five miles of their hive. If you provide no nectar or pollen sources in your yard, they'll go elsewhere.

Theirs is a dangerous occupation. No thanks to predators (such as birds, praying mantids and spiders) and pesticides, many do not return home at night.

Like to photograph them? Try the "magic hour," which occurs about an hour before the sun sets. We love photographing them on Mexican sunflowers (Tithonia). The light is soft, warm and welcoming.

(Editor's Note: Interested in becoming a beekeeper or learning more about beekeeping? Be sure to check out the UC Davis-based California Master Beekeeper Program, directed by Extension apiculturist Elina Lastro Niño of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. The next course is on managing varroa mites, a major pest.)

Worker honey bee forages on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in the magic hour, the hour before sunset. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Worker honey bee forages on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in the magic hour, the hour before sunset. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Illuminated by the late afternoon sun, the worker bee prepares to fly to another Tithonia blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Illuminated by the late afternoon sun, the worker bee prepares to fly to another Tithonia blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A worker bee takes flight, lifting over a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A worker bee takes flight, lifting over a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

OPENING WEEKEND - Los Angeles County Fair - Buzz By the Bee Booth!

LA County Fair 2019 logo 320.jpg

LOS ANGELES COUNTY FAIR
BEE BOOTH
August 30 - September 22, 2019

Pomona Fairgrounds
1101 West McKinley Avenue
Pomona, CA 91768
(The Bee Booth is located across from the “Big Red Barn”)
https://www.lacountyfair.com/

Fair Opens Labor Day Weekend (Fri-Mon)
Fair Runs August 30 - September 22, 2019
(Closed Mondays & Tuesdays except Labor Day, Sept. 2)
Fair Schedule for the General Public


VISIT THE BEE BOOTH!

Bee Booth at the LA County Fair.jpg

From August 30 through September 22, 2019, volunteer members of the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association and the Beekeepers Association of Southern California will be on hand at the Los Angeles County Fair Bee Booth educating thousands of school children and the general public about honeybees and the importance they play in our lives. The LA County Fair is one of the largest county fairs in the country and is the most-visited event in the Los Angeles region in September. It's an end-of-summer tradition for many. 

OBSERVATION HIVE!

LA County Fair Bee Booth Observation Hive.jpg

Gather round our fabulous HONEY BEE OBSERVATION HIVE. See if you can FIND THE QUEEN!
Let us spark your interest in honey bees, their amazing lifestyle and social structure, how they help feed the world, and how they have survived for millions of years.

HONEY! HONEY! HONEY!

LA County Fair Bee Booth Local Honey.jpg

Delicious pure, natural, 100% raw local honey direct from Los Angeles County beekeepers is available for purchase. Pick up HONEY STIX in YUMMY flavors and vibrant colors.
Proceeds from honey sales go to Honey Bee Research. 

MEET THE 2019 AMERICAN HONEY PRINCESS!

2019 AMERICAN HONEY PRINCESS, NICOLE MEDINA.

2019 AMERICAN HONEY PRINCESS, NICOLE MEDINA.

Nicole Medina
The American Beekeeping Federation
2019 American Honey Princess

Nicole Medina, the 2019 American Honey Princess, will visit Los Angeles, California, September 3-8, as part of her National Honey Month Tour.  She will be a guest of the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association at the Los Angeles County Fair, speaking to fair goers about the importance of honeybees to California agriculture and how honeybees drive the quantity and quality of our food.  She will also share information about the bonuses that honeybees provide beyond honey.  Nicole’s trip is sponsored by the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association.

Nicole is the daughter of Joel and Nolvia Medina of Green Township, New Jersey.  She is a sophomore at Sussex County Community College studying business administration.  Nicole has been keeping bees for five years with her family and is an active volunteer in the Sussex County Beekeepers Association. 

As the 2019 American Honey Princess, Nicole serves as a national spokesperson on behalf of the American Beekeeping Federation, a trade organization representing beekeepers and honey producers throughout the United States.  The American Honey Queen and Princess speak and promote in venues nationwide, and, as such, Princess Nicole will travel throughout the United States in 2019.  Prior to being selected as the American Honey Princess, Nicole served as the 2018 New Jersey Honey Queen.  In this role, she promoted the honey industry at fairs, festivals, and farmers’ markets, via media interviews, and in schools. 

The beekeeping industry touches the lives of every individual in our country.  In fact, honeybees are responsible for nearly one-third of our entire diet, in regards to the pollination services that they provide for a large majority of fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes. This amounts to nearly $19 billion per year of direct value from honeybee pollination to United States agriculture.

VOLUNTEER MEMBERS OF THE LACBA AND BASC

The following information, schedule, and times is for the LACBA and BASC Bee Booth Volunteers. Schedule and times for the General Public can be found here: https://lacountyfair.com/.

2018 Bee Booth Observation Hive.jpg

Hello Fellow Beekeepers:

The Los Angeles County Fair is upon us. All
E-vites were sent out Aug 5. Your email will come through Sign-up.com (Copy Los Angeles fair). If you did not receive your E-vite, check your spam, if not, call me (323) 243-0756 and I will be happy to either resend or help you schedule a day and shift time.

Some points to be aware of:

The day that you’re scheduled for, please plan to come early as I understand that security is going to be tight. Please bring your patience.

Your entry pass and parking pass will be at Gate 1 on McKinley at the "Will Call" window. Parking is only for 15 minutes, you'll then need to move your vehicle to the parking gates noted on your parking pass. Give them your name and tell them that you’re gong to the Bee Exhibit. Both these passes are good for the entire day.

The Bee Booth is located in the Heritage area. The last little red building before the farm area.

If you wish to purchase an LACBA green shirt they will be available at the venue. The cost is $15.00. If you already own one, please wear it. This helps our guests know who to go to with questions.

If you want to schedule a same day or next day time and shift, please call me so I may make arrangements to have your passes at the "Will Call" window.

Come help educate your community about bees! Mingle with fellow beekeepers! You'll learn more than you could ever imagine about bees by being a part of the LA County Fair Bee Booth. This is a great opportunity to share what you've learned in Beekeeping Class 101. We guarantee you won't be bored - and we could use your help at the Honey Table and with the Observation Hive.

Your presence helps to make the fair successful. Please remember that much of the funds that we raise goes to bee research. So, please come out and volunteer to help make this another successful year with your other fellow beekeepers.

If you have any questions please feel free to call or email me (323) 243-0756 or cynthia.alvarado56@yahoo.com.

Bee Booth Set Up - Saturday (August 24th) 9AM-2PM: Come help set up the Bee Booth. Enter through Gate 1. Drive to the Bee Booth across from the Big Red Barn. On Bee Booth SET UP DAY ONLY you can park near the Bee Booth. Lunch will be provided. There's plenty to do and we have lots of fun!!!

Bee Booth Volunteer Fair Days: The fair runs from August 30 - September 22 (Wed thru Sun) except for Labor Day Weekend (Fri thru Mon). We have 3 shifts per day (no less than 4 volunteers per shift). Shifts available: All Labor Day Weekend and all Saturdays and Sundays: 9:30-1:00, 12:30-5:00, 4:30-10:00. On Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays: 9:00-1:00, 12:30-5:00, 4:30-10:00.

Bee Booth Take Down - Sunday, (September 22rd): We start taking down the Bee Booth in the evening. The more help we have, the quicker we're done. We need to be finished and off the fairgrounds by 10PM.

Parking for Bee Booth Volunteers:
Lot 9
(across the street from the fair): Walk across the street, enter through the gate, go under the tunnel, turn right. We're across from the Big Red Barn.

Lot 17 Go across the race track to the far side of the Big Red Barn.

Tickets for Bee Booth Volunteers: Tickets will be at WILL CALL at the McKinley Entrance (Gate 1). They will be under Bee Booth Exhibit under your name. Please allow approx. 15 min. to get your tickets.

We had a great time at last year's fair. See our 2018 Bee Booth Photo Album on Facebook.

JUST SOME OF THE MANY VOLUNTEERS FROM THE LOS ANGELES COUNTY BEEKEEPERS ASSOCIATION AND THE BEEKEEPERS ASSOCIATION OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA! THANK YOU ALL FOR YOUR MANY HOURS HELPING THE HONEY BEES!

JUST SOME OF THE MANY VOLUNTEERS FROM THE LOS ANGELES COUNTY BEEKEEPERS ASSOCIATION AND THE BEEKEEPERS ASSOCIATION OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA! THANK YOU ALL FOR YOUR MANY HOURS HELPING THE HONEY BEES!

The Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. 100% of the funds raised through donations and all profit from honey sales go to honey bee education and research. Thank you!

LA County Fair Bee Booth Set Up

Thank you!

Thank you to all the member volunteers from the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association and the Beekeepers Association of Southern California for heading out to the Pomona Fairgrounds today to help set up the Bee Booth at the LA County Fair!

Beekeeper Bob is ready to greet you at the Bee Booth!

Beekeeper Bob is ready to greet you at the Bee Booth!

Bees and Honey at the Bee Booth!

Bees and Honey at the Bee Booth!

A fresh new coat of paint!

A fresh new coat of paint!

Lunch time at Bee Booth Set Up!

Lunch time at Bee Booth Set Up!

LACBA and BASC Member Volunteers

Thank you to the LACBA and BASC volunteer members who have already signed up to work the Bee Booth. This is a great opportunity to be of service to the honey bees, the LA County Fair, the General Public, and your Beekeeping Associations. If you have not already signed up - we can use your help! If you have not received your Evite, please contact our Bee Booth Coordinator Extraordinaire, Cindy Alvarado at (323- 243-0756 or cynthia.alvarado56@yahoo.com.

An Average Day at the Bee Booth!

Learn about bees, find the queen, pick up some raw local honey from Los Angeles County beekeepers.

Learn about bees, find the queen, pick up some raw local honey from Los Angeles County beekeepers.

Microbes on the Menu for Bee Larvae

PHYS.ORG (ARS News Service) By Jan Suszkiw (US Department of Agriculture) August 20, 2019

Newly hatched blue mason bee larvae feeding on pollen provisions within a hollow reed.  Photo Credit: Shawn Steffan

Newly hatched blue mason bee larvae feeding on pollen provisions within a hollow reed. Photo Credit: Shawn Steffan

MADISON, WISCONSIN, August 20, 2019—Bees only feast on nectar and pollen, right?

Wrong. Turns out, Nature's famously busy insect isn't strictly vegan, after all.

Reporting online in this month's American Naturalist, a team of Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and university scientists has shown that bee larvae (brood) have a taste for "microbial meat."

ARS entomologist Shawn Steffan and his colleagues at the University of Wisconsin, Cornell University, and Hokkaido University in Japan coined the term to describe an important ingredient in the brood's pollen provisions—namely, the protein of beneficial bacteria and fungi.

The microbes are naturally occurring in the pollen and feed and multiply within it. In the process, they increase the pollen's nutritional value to brood by enrichening it with amino acids—the building blocks of protein—that flowering plants alone may not always provide.

"Bees actually require the non-plant proteins of these pollen-borne symbionts to complete their growth and development—which makes them omnivores," explained Steffan, with the ARS Vegetable Crops Research Unit in Madison, Wisconsin.

In fact, the team observed an appetite for microbial meat among brood that spanned 14 species distributed across all major families of social and solitary bees—Melittidae, Apidae and Megachilidae among them.

The microbes don't just serve themselves up as critical sources of amino acids, though. They also secrete enzymes that help break down and age raw pollen into a more nutritious and digestible form known as "beebread." Nurse bees may recognize this benefit and encourage the microbes' growth in pollen fed to brood, note the researchers in their paper. This microbial mix-mash may also check the growth of harmful bacteria or fungi that can ruin beebread or sicken the hive.

For their study, the researchers used isotope- and gas chromatography-based methods to calculate the ratio of nitrogen in two types of amino acids (glutamic acid and phenylalanine) in the tissues of adult bees and in beebread. The team chose the method because of its accuracy in determining an organism's trophic position—where it stands on the proverbial food web of life based on the flow of nutrients and energy from producers to consumers of these resources.

In this case, the team's isotope analysis showed that bee brood's consumption of both plant and microbial proteins warranted raising the insect's trophic status from that of a strict herbivore to an omnivore.

More broadly, Steffan said, the findings underscore the need to examine what effects fungicide use on flowering crops can have on the microbial make up of pollen fed to brood and, in turn, their development.

The Agricultural Research Service is the U.S. Department of Agriculture's chief scientific in-house research agency. Daily, ARS focuses on solutions to agricultural problems affecting America. Each dollar invested in agricultural research results in $20 of economic impact.

https://phys.org/news/2019-08-microbes-menu-bee-larvae.html

How Bees Defend Themselves from Predators

AgNet West By Cathy Isom August 19, 2019

In this part of her series on raising bees, Cathy Isom lets you know about how bees defend themselves. That’s coming up on This Land of Ours.

In this part of her series on raising bees, Cathy Isom lets you know about how bees defend themselves. That’s coming up on This Land of Ours.

Honeybees tend to take excellent care of themselves, however, unlike most animals we care for, we have very little control over what happens when a busy bee leaves its hive in pursuit of pollen.

A honeybee’s primary defense mechanism is its ability to sting a predator, injecting a debilitating, sometimes deadly, venom. Amazingly, only female honeybees can deliver a sting to its enemies, and despite what most people believe, the bee does not die after stinging its attacker, unless it has stung a mammal with fleshy skin– such as a human.

A Japanese honeybee feeds from a garden cosmos flower

A Japanese honeybee feeds from a garden cosmos flower

The Japanese honeybee has come up with an ingenious way to kill larger insects that pose a threat to their hives, like the wasp. If an intruder is nearby, the honeybees will plot to ambush the unwanted visitor. Literally, they get together, hide, and then attack the intruder.

The bees attack the predator by forming a “bee ball” around it and begin flapping their wings to create an intolerable, deadly, environment for the predator. Heat and carbon monoxide from the rapid wing-flapping suffocate and kill the intruder. There is hope that this trait can be bred into other types of bees, but at this time, there has been little success.

Bees actually create their own entrance reducer with propolis— a strong mixture of wax, saliva, and sap. Honeybees have rarely been known to take this action on their own. Most of the reports of a bee-made reducer come after a manmade reducer has been removed.

I’m Cathy Isom…

http://agnetwest.com/how-bees-defend-themselves-predators/

Celebrate National Honey Bee Day at The Valley Hive Honey Competition & Recipe Contest

Celebrate National Honeybee Day
The Valley Hive's 4th Annual
HONEY COMPETITION AND RECIPE CONTEST
Sunday, August 18th from 4pm to 7pm
10538 Topanga Cyn Blvd in Chatsworth!

It's the perfect venue for celebrating NATIONAL HONEYBEE DAY.

Come on out to taste backyard honey and delectable recipes made with honey.  Meet local vendors.  Drink honey cocktails.  Learn how to make mead and how to cook with honey.  There will be kids activities. As well as a belly dance performance.

Got honey? Join dozens of other local beekeepers and show off your prize honey by entering our Honey Competition.  Submit 2 - 8oz jars of honey (1 labeled & 1 unlabeled) by Friday August 16th.

Not a beekeeper? Enter a favorite recipe that uses honey. From sweet to savory, give us your best dish!  Entries must be received by 3pm on Sunday August 18th.  Bring 3 servings for the Judges and more for the crowd to try at the event.

This event has always been held as a Fundraiser for honeybees, and this year is no different. 
This year, all donations received from this event will go to Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association.

honey competition winners 2018.jpg