Public Invited to Beekeeping Workshop

Cal Poly Pomona Apiary.jpg

Cal Poly Pomona
Beekeeping Workshop
Saturday, November 9, 2019
9AM - 4PM

Cal Poly Pomona Apiary and Pollinator Garden
Cal Poly Pomona - Parking Lot M
3801
Pomona, CA 91768
View Map

Lecturer Mark Haag examines a frame that he selected from a beehive.

Lecturer Mark Haag examines a frame that he selected from a beehive.

The course of the year!

Expert instructors with decades of combined beekeeping experience provide an intimate hands-on workshop where you can handle bees and learn hive manipulation from the very best. Varroa mite testing will also be taught.

We will even extract a little honey!

The workshop is suitable for those interested in beekeeping from beginners to intermediate.
Lunch and learning materials provided. Don't have a bee suit.... borrow one of ours!!

For more information and questions contact - Mark Haag mjhaag@cpp.edu

This event sells out each session, Register Early!

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/cal-poly-pomona-fall-beekeeping-class-tickets-54654771894

Special Note:
Long time beekeeper, Bill Lewis (Owner of Bill’s Bees), past President of the California State Beekeepers Association and the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association will be among the industry experts and training advisers at this exceptional Beekeeping Workshop.

Using Probiotics to Protect Honey Bees Against Fatal Disease

Science Daily Source: University of Western Ontario October 30, 2019

A group of researchers combined their expertise in probiotics and bee biology to supplement honey bee food with probiotics, in the form a BioPatty, in their experimental apiaries. The aim was to see what effect probiotics would have on honey bee health.

Probiotics, beneficial microorganisms best known for promoting gut health in humans, are now being used by Western University and Lawson Health Research Institute scientists to save honey bee colonies from collapse. A new study published in the Nature journal ISME J demonstrates how probiotics could potentially stave off a common bacterial hive infestation called American Foulbrood.

"Probiotics aren't just for humans," said Gregor Reid, PhD, Professor at Western's Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry and Endowed Chair in Human Microbiome and Probiotics at Lawson. "Our idea was that if you could use beneficial microbes to stimulate the immune response or attack the pathogens that are infecting the hives, then maybe we can help save the bees."

Honey bees are an important part of the cultural and economic landscape in Canada and globally because of their role in food production both through pollination of crops and through honey production. However, the world's bee population is being threatened by the spread of viruses and bacteria that infect the hives.

The team's previous work in a fruit-fly model suggested that the wide-use of pesticides reduces bees' immunity and their ability to fight back against these harmful pathogens.

With that in mind, a group of researchers at Western and Lawson combined their expertise in probiotics and bee biology to supplement honey bee food with probiotics, in the form a BioPatty, in their experimental apiaries. The aim was to see what effect probiotics would have on honey bee health.

During their experiment, the hives became inadvertently infected with American Foulbrood, a common hive disease produced by the bacteria P. larvae, which would typically cause the bees to die.

"Bee colonies are really interesting little microcosms of biology. There are lots of individuals bees, but they are all genetically related and they are living in a close confined space," said Graham Thompson, PhD, Associate Professor in the Faculty of Science at Western who studies the biology and social behaviour of bees. "They are all very susceptible to contagious disease and they are demographically disposed to outbreaks."

What they found was that in the bee hives treated with probiotics, the pathogen load was reduced by 99 per cent, and the survival-rate of the bees increased significantly. When they examined the bees in the lab, they also found that there was increased immunity against the bacteria that causes American Foulbrood in the bees treated with the probiotics.

"The results from our study demonstrated that probiotic supplementation could increase the expression of a gene called Defensin-1 -- a key antimicrobial peptide shown to play a pivotal role in honey bee defense against P. larvae infection," said Schulich Medicine & Dentistry PhD Candidate Brendan Daisley who was the lead author on the paper. "Alongside these findings, we also observed an increase in pathogen clearance and overall survival of honey bee larvae."

Another interesting observation was that the bees that were given the BioPatty, but no probiotic, were the most susceptible, even more so than bees that were given nothing at all. The research team says this suggests there may be a negative outcome to the common practise of supplementing bee colonies with extra food as it could stimulate the pathogens to proliferate.

"Long term we hope to add a viable, practical and available treatment alternative to chemicals and antibiotics that beekeepers can readily adopt into their bee-keeping habits to help prevent colony collapse," said Thompson.

Story Source:

Materials provided by University of Western OntarioNote: Content may be edited for style and length.

Journal Reference:

  1. Brendan A. Daisley, Andrew P. Pitek, John A. Chmiel, Kait F. Al, Anna M. Chernyshova, Kyrillos M. Faragalla, Jeremy P. Burton, Graham J. Thompson & Gregor Reid. Novel probiotic approach to counter Paenibacillus larvae infection in honey bees. ISME J, 2019 DOI: 10.1038/s41396-019-0541-6

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/10/191030132715.htm

LACBA Meeting Monday, November 4, 2019

Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association.jpg

Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association
Next Meeting: Monday, November 4, 2019
General Meeting: 7:00PM / Doors Open: 6:30PM (Meet & Greet)
https://www.losangelescountybeekeepers.com/

Mt. Olive Lutheran Church 
3561 Foothill Boulevard 
La Crescenta, CA  91214
Map to Meeting

See Election Information at the bottom of the post.

October Minutes

Agenda:

Meet and Greet - 6:30pm / General Meeting: 7:00pm

a.      Welcome

b.     Flag Salute

c.      Introduce the board Kevin Heydman, Vice President; Merrill Kruger, Secretary; Danny White, Treasurer, El Rey Ench, Member at Large and I, Jon Reese, LACBA President.  

d.     Select Raffle ticket seller, index cards for questions

e.      New Members and/or guests

f.       Thank Doug Noland for the treat du jour

Topic Speaker for November:
Mark Haag with research at Cal Poly Pomona. - New mite test.

Reports:

Beekeeping 101 - Keith Roberts, Class final Observations…Next year, thoughts, ideas?

Meeting Minutes: Mary Ann Laun

Secretary’s Report: Merrill Kruger

Treasurer's Report: Danny White

Membership Report: Cheryl Thiele

Website: Eva Andrews

Education: Mary Landau – opportunities to educate.   

Holiday Banquet: Doug Noland 

Elections: Mary Ann Laun

Disbursement of Donations: Boards donation policy is changing to supporting local organizations and getting them to tell about their organization/research for our buck.

We are already committed to: (See LACBA Fair Sheet)

What’s blooming?

Index cards Q&A

Next Month - 2019 LACBA Annual Holiday Dinner (There will not be an LACBA Meeting in December.)

Raffle –

Election & Voting Information:

Mary Ann Laun has agreed to prepare a ballot of nominees for the November election of LACBA officers. Offices open for nomination include:

  • Vice-President (who will become the next president)

  • Secretary

  • Treasurer

  • Member at large (5th board member)

Please submits names for consideration before November 1 and include email and phone number of the nominee. Be sure to ask the person you would like to nominate if they would be interested, before you nominate them.

Send to Maryannlaun@yahoo.com

Nominations will also be taken from the floor, as well, before the vote.

Only voting members can vote:

Voting Membership (Household) $20: A Voting Membership requires 5 hours of volunteer participation with the LACBA during the course of the previous year for each member in the household who wishes to vote. A Voting Membership requires: 1. Attending monthly LACBA meetings, 2. Donating time (5 hr or one shift to club activities - LA County Fair, LA Zoo, Honey Harvest Festival, various fairs and events we do), and/or participating in Beekeeping Class 101, etc.

2019 CSBA ANNUAL CONVENTION

Join us for the Annual Business Meeting & Convention!

November 19-21, 2019Pechanga Resort CasinoTemecula, CA

It’s time once again for the annual California State Beekeepers Association convention! This is the one time each year when beekeepers from California and throughout the U.S. come together as an industry. Here are few reasons to attend:

Pechanga Resort Casino: This year’s convention has moved to a great new venue that features dining, entertainment and
gambling. Wait until you see what this elegant resort has to offer!

Get Updated on Critical Topics: This year’s conference agenda will include the latest information on important issues like bee health, honey safety and regulatory updates on interstate travel, California law and county importation. CSBA Convention 2019 is bringing in experts to share insights that will help you successfully manage your business.

President’s Opening Reception on the Patio: Always a fun event, this year we will enjoy the beautiful patio of the Pechanga Resort.

Annual Banquet Dinner and Surprise Entertainment: You won’t want to miss this evening of food and laughter.

Please take some time to look through the information available here. We’ve made it easy to register for everything online. We have a terrific event planned. We hope to see you there!

Late Registration Fees (Oct. 22– Nov 19) will be an additional $50 to all categories.

https://www.californiastatebeekeepers.com/annual-convention/

Randy Oliver Workshop - October 19 & 20, 2019


This Weekend
The Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association
Presents
The Randy Oliver Workshop
(at 2 locations)
Join Us!
Registration Required

Randy Oliver headshot.jpg

Randy Oliver is a world renowned speaker, educator, bee biologist, leading researcher, commercial beekeeper, and regular contributor to the American Beekeeping Journal.  He is one of the premier beekeeping speakers in the U.S. and the owner/author of http://scientificbeekeeping.com.

WHEN:
Saturday, October 19, 2019, 9AM - 1 or 2PM (approx.)
WHERE:
California State Polytechnic University (CalPolyPomona)
3801 West Temple Ave., Pomona, CA 91768
Building 34 marked as the Meat Laboratory
https://www.foundation.cpp.edu/content/maps/foundation-map.pdf
Lunch Provided: Pulled Pork, Beans, Cole Slaw, Chips, Water & Soda
(Registration Required)

and

WHEN:
Sunday, October 20, 2019, 11AM - 3PM (approx.)
WHERE:
The Valley Hive
10538 Topanga Canyon Blvd.
Chatsworth, CA 91311 (818) 280-6500
Please park on Topanga Canyon Blvd.
Lunch Provided: TBD
(Registration Required)

COST:
Registration Required
FREE for LACBA Members
$25 for Non-Members
Become a Member: $20
If you haven’t registered yet, please do so now - we need a food count!

The Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. Through the volunteer efforts of LACBA members we raise monies throughout the year at events such as the LA County Fair Bee Booth, LA Zoo Spring Fling, Honey Harvest Festival and other endeavors. Through honey sales at various events and donations to our organization, we gain the funds necessary to provide educational and informational opportunities such as the Randy Oliver Workshop.
Please come to our LACBA Meeting and learn more about the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association.

https://www.losangelescountybeekeepers.com/

2019 LACBA Annual Holiday Dinner

2019 Holiday Dinner at Pickwick Gardens.jpg

You’re Invited to Our 2019 LACBA Annual Holiday Dinner
at the Beautiful Pickwick Gardens!

1001 W. Riverside Dr,
Burbank, CA 91506
(Conference Center - Directions & Map)

When: Monday, December 2, 2019
Time: 6-9pm
Cost: $10 per person + bring a dessert, appetizer or an item to be raffled

PURCHASE DINNER TICKETS ONLINE BY
Sunday November 25, 2019
Click Here to Purchase Dinner!

Now that we’re equipped to take payments online,
we will not be taking payment for dinner or membership dues at the dinner.

We are excited to announce our 2019 LACBA Annual Holiday Dinner. This is the time of year when we get together to kick back, relax, and talk about anything and everything, including…BEES! Our Holiday Dinner is a family friendly open event - feel free to bring your spouse, partner, kids and friends. We will hold our largest RAFFLE of the year and present the Golden Hive Tool Award.

We will have a guest speaker from CSU Channel Islands.

Thank you to Doug Noland, LACBA Member, for providing a wonderful dinner from Outback Catering.

'The Pollinators' Opens nationwide in November!

The Pollinators.jpg

The Pollinators is going into cinemas nationwide in November!  Woo Hoo!!!

November 6th is a national day of screening in the U.S. for The Pollinators with hundreds of cinema screenings on that day. 
 
In Canada, the day will be November 11th.  

The Pollinators will be available in cities and towns, big and small from coast to coast in movie theaters.  We’re excited about this new distribution model––it’s cinema screenings by crowd sourcing––Bringing films to the big screen and directly to the people who want to see them.  Watch The Pollinators trailer.  
                                            
Demand.Film is distributing The Pollinators theatrically and works with cinema chains and arthouses to book theaters.  You can find or request a screening near you.  Tickets are available on the Demand.Film website and people reserve tickets in advance.  Word is spread within your community and when the ticket reservation threshold is met (usually about 50 seats), the screening is confirmed and the movie screens as a single night event.  Tickets are charged only at that point, so there is no risk to the audience or the theater. 

There is a time limit however.

Reserve your tickets by October 28th so we can lock in the theaters.  If you are interested in going, please reserve your tickets today.  Once a venue is booked, tickets will still be available right up to the actual day of screening.
Because of your interest in the film, we would like to offer a limited time discount code.  Use the code Pollinator10 at purchase. 

on demand.jpg

There is also another opportunity for you to help support The Pollinators.
Each screening page has a promoter and that could be you!
It's simple to do, it doesn't cost anything and you will probably meet some very cool people along the way.
Show your support for bees and our food system by sharing and promoting the screening in person and through your social media channels. Use the event to gather your friends and colleagues.
Be The Pollinators "ambeesador" in your community.
Contact us to find out how to put your name on a screening.

Check out The Pollinators website to see the latest updates and be sure to connect with us on social media. Please email us with any questions and feel free to share this with your friends and colleagues.
Many thanks for all your enthusiastic support of The Pollinators.
Best, Peter

U.C. San Diego Nieh Research Lab

The Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association was honored to have Dr. James Nieh, Professor/Chief Investigator and Amy Geffre, PhD Candidate, share their latest honey bee research at our meeting, Monday, October 7, 2019.

Following are links to the US Can Diego Nieh Lab:

Honey bee health - https://labs.biology.ucsd.edu/nieh/honeybee_health.html
What’s new - https://labs.biology.ucsd.edu/nieh/inthenews.html
All our publications - https://labs.biology.ucsd.edu/nieh/publications.html

James C. Nieh
Professor, Section of Ecology, Behavior, and Evolution
Division of Biological Sciences
UCSD

Office: Muir Biology Room 1116
(w) 858 822 5010
(fax) 858 534 7108

Mailing address for letters:
James C. Nieh
UCSD
9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0116
La Jolla, CA 92093-0116
USA

Mailing address for packages:
James C. Nieh
UCSD
Biology Building Rm1121
7835 Trade St. Suite 100
San Diego, CA 92121-2460
USA
http://labs.biology.ucsd.edu/nieh/

You can email Amy Geffre at: ageffre@ucsd.edu

You can also access links to the UC San Diego Nieh Lab on the LACBA Education & Research page.

James Nieh To Speak at the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association Meeting October 7, 2019

Honey Bee Research

Professor James Nieh

Professor James Nieh

Research in the Nieh lab focuses on how natural and man-made stressors affect the biology of and cognitively sophisticated behaviors exhibited by bees. Our research focuses on two areas: (1) the selective pressures that may have shaped the evolution of communication in highly social bees and (2) honey bee health. We use the tools of Behavioral Ecology, Chemical Ecology, Animal Communication and Neuroethology to work with bumble bees, stingless bees, and honey bees. Five different topic areas are detailed below. For further information, please view the Nieh Lab Homepage.

Evolution of Communication.jpg

Evolution of Communication
Selective pressures from competitors and predators has shaped social bee communication. Our lab studies multiple bee groups: honey bees, stingless bees, and bumble bees to learn how this communication works and why it may have evolved.

Honey Bee Health.jpg

Honey Bee Health
Concern is growing over pollinator declines. Our lab examines the effects of natural stressors, such as pathogens, and man-made stressors, such as pesticides, on honey bee health, foraging, flight, and orientation.

Superorganism.jpg

Superorganism Inhibitory Communication
What happens if conditions change and the communicated food source becomes depleted, contested, or dangerous? The honey bee stop signal provides inhibition  that counteracts the positive feedback of honey bee waggle dances. Using field studies and modeling, we are studying this signal in detail and exploring conditions under which inhibitory signals may evolve.

Superorganism 2.jpg

Superorganism Inhibitory Communication
We study olfactory eavesdropping in stingless bees and honey bees and examine the advantages of eavesdropping upon competitors and predators.

neurotheology.jpg

Neuroethology of Bee Learning and Memory
Despite their small brain size and limited number of neurons relative to the central nervous systems of many vertebrates, social insects have evolved sophisticated learning and memory abilities and are therefore important models for animal cognition. However, these abilities can be impaired by field-realistic exposure to pesticides and other man-made stressors.

http://biology.ucsd.edu/research/faculty/jnieh

LACBA Meeting Monday, October 7, 2019

Beekeepers' Logo border600.jpg

Next LACBA Meeting
Monday, October 7, 2019
Doors Open: 6:30PM (Meet & Greet)
General Meeting: 7:00PM
All are Welcome!

Mt. Olive Lutheran Church 
3561 Foothill Boulevard 
La Crescenta, CA  91214

Agenda:

Meet and Greet - 6:30pm

General Meeting: 7:00pm

a.      Welcome

b.     Flag Salute

c.      Introduce the board Kevin Heydman, Vice President; Merrill Kruger, Secretary; Danny White, Treasurer, El Rey Ench, Member at Large and I, Jon Reese, LACBA President.  

d.     Select Raffle ticket seller, index cards for questions

e.      New Members and/or guests

f.       Thank Doug Noland for the treat du jour

Topic Speaker for October:
James Nieh, Principal Investigator, and another Researcher from the UC San Diego Nieh Bee Lab will present ongoing studies.  

Note: We are endeavoring to support research in our area. Cal Poly Pomona, UC San Diego, UC Riverside and UC “Bee Campus”Channel Islands all have honey bee programs and we are supporting these programs by inviting them to present experiments and findings at our meetings and giving scholarships/donations to further their research.

Mite load?

Reports:

Meeting Minutes: Mary Ann Laun

Secretary’s Report: Merrill Kruger

Treasurer's Report: Danny White

Membership Report: Cheryl Thiele

Website: Eva Andrews

Education: Mary Landau – opportunities to educate.   

Beekeeping 101 - Keith Roberts - How did bee class go and what’s in the next class

Holiday Banquet: Doug Noland 

Economic Planning:  Next month

Elections next month Nominations?

Disbursement of Donations: Boards donation policy is changing to supporting local organizations and getting them to tell about their organization/research.

We are already committed to:

American Honey Federation: Honey Queen

Pollinator Stewardship Council: Michelle Colopy

Randy Oliver:  2 day w. lunch 2 locations– this year.

USC San Diego: October

Cal Poly Pomona: November

USC Channel Islands: Present Banquet     

 What’s blooming?

Index cards Q&A

Next month Elections yes?  Donations 

Raffle –

The 2019 LA County Fair Bee Booth

The 2019 LA County Fair Bee Booth was a grand adventure with thousands of fair goers stopping by to learn about honey bees.

We’d like to say a big THANK YOU to all the volunteer members of the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association and the Beekeepers Association of Southern California who worked countless hours to bring their adventures in beekeeping, knowledge of honey bees, and joy for this amazing creature to so many.

Fair goers love the Bee Booth at the LA County Fair.

Fair goers love the Bee Booth at the LA County Fair.

Fair goers enjoy listening to Nicole Medina, the 2019 American Honey Princess, share her experience and knowledge about honey bees at the LA County Fair Bee Booth.

Fair goers enjoy listening to Nicole Medina, the 2019 American Honey Princess, share her experience and knowledge about honey bees at the LA County Fair Bee Booth.

These are some of the many volunteer members of the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association and the Beekeepers Association of Southern California who donated their time and expertise at the 2019 LA County Fair Bee Booth.

These are some of the many volunteer members of the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association and the Beekeepers Association of Southern California who donated their time and expertise at the 2019 LA County Fair Bee Booth.

Enjoy more images in our 2019 LA County Fair Bee Booth Photo Album.

Go to our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/losangelesbeekeeping/ and share in our 2019 LA County Fair Bee Booth Photo Album what you learned about honey bees at the fair. We’d love to hear from you!

Canada's York University to Develop 'BEECSI' Tool to Help Canada's Rapidly Declining Honey Bees, and, BBKA on Guard for Asian Hornet

CATCH THE BUZZ October 2, 2019

Associate Professor Amro Zayed – York University, Asian Hornet

Associate Professor Amro Zayed – York University, Asian Hornet

TORONTO, September 18, 2019 – When Canada’s honey bees are thriving, they produce honey and pollinate valuable crops like blueberries, apples and hybrid canola seeds.

But the health of honey bees is declining, with more than a quarter of honey bee colonies dying each winter. These deaths have left beekeepers and government regulators struggling to find ways to quickly diagnose, manage and improve bee health.

The solution could be a new bee health diagnosis tool being created as part of a research project led by bee genomics expert Associate Professor Amro Zayed, of York University, along with Professor Leonard Foster, of the University of British Columbia. On October 1, they will launch a $10 million project to develop a new health assessment and diagnosis platform, supported by Ontario Genomics and Genome Canada.

“We need to think of innovative solutions to fix the bee health crisis. The current tools are just not cutting it,” said Zayed in the Department of Biology, Faculty of Science.

Honey bees produce 90 million pounds of honey each year and are needed to pollinate some of Canada’s most lucrative crops. Their pollination services are valued at $5.5 billion per year in Canada alone.

The causes of bee decline are complex, variable, and difficult to identify. But beekeepers and government regulators need to rapidly identify the stressors impacting specific populations before they can make changes to improve bee health. Currently, the industry uses post-mortem analysis to test for the presence of a few known pathogens or toxins in dead colonies. These tests are often expensive, time consuming, and provide an incomplete picture of the stressors affecting bee health.

The research team is looking to modernize the industry by delivering a tool to quickly assess bee health in living colonies that would allow loss-mitigating strategies to be implemented.

“You can identify the stressors affecting a colony, not by searching for the stressor itself, but by looking for specific signatures of stress in the bee – what we call biomarkers,” explained Zayed. “The biomarker approach has a lot of potential for quickly screening stressors affecting bees before colonies decline.”

The researchers will use genomic tools to measure stressor-induced changes in bees to identify biomarkers for specific stressors. By the end of the project, the researchers envision a system where beekeepers can send their samples for biomarker testing and receive a report with both a health assessment and information on the most effective management strategies, which can then be applied in the field to improve the health of their colonies.

The research team is comprised of 22 researchers from across Canada including researchers from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), University of Manitoba, University of Guelph and University of Laval. The project is funded through Genome Canada’s Large-Scale Applied Research Project Competition: Genomics Solutions for Agriculture, Agri-food, Fisheries and Aquaculture. Funding partners include Genome Canada, AAFC, Genome British Columbia and Genome Quebec.

__________________________________

Dorset on the Front Line in Fight Against Asian Hornets

James Moules @DorsetEchoJames

DORSET has been described as on the “front line” of the threat that Asian Hornets pose to bee colonies.

The British Beekeepers Association (BBKA) promoted Asian Hornet Week from September 9 to September 15 to raise awareness of the danger of these insects.

Asian Hornets are predators to flying insects, including honey bees, which has caused a problem for beekeepers in areas where they have been found. They have been causing trouble on the island of Jersey, and a few sightings have been reported on mainland Britain in recent years.

Beekeepers have raised concerns of the effect these hornets could have on the pollinator population.

Mark White, the Asian Hornet Action Team coordinator for Dorset, said: “Being the Channel Islands gateway, Dorset is very much on the front line in the fight against the Asians Hornets.

“Bees make up a substantial part of their diet. Anything that will fly, they will try and catch it in mid-flight and decapitate it.”

People who suffer from anaphylaxis should be aware that the stings from Asian Hornets can trigger an anaphylactic shock.

Anyone trying to identify an Asian Hornet should look for insects that can be up to 30mm in length for a queen and 25mm for a worker, have a mostly black body with a small yellow band near the rear and have yellow legs and an orange face with brown-red compound eyes.

Anne Rowberry, the BBKA’s Asian Hornet coordinator, said: “We are asking everyone to be vigilant in looking out for this alien species, the Asian Hornet, Vespa velutina. It could decimate our pollinators, including our honey bees, it is important to have everyone actively looking for it. It’s not just a beekeeping problem.

“Now is the time for trapping and spending a little more time watching to see if hornets are hawking your hives in your apiary, put an hour aside to watch each day for hornets during Asian Hornet week and remember to look for them on late sources of nectar like ivy.”

A BBKA spokesman said that risk of Asian Hornet nests drops considerably during the winter months, but is greater during summer and autumn.

There have been a total of 15 confirmed sightings of Asian Hornets in England since 2016. Six nests have been destroyed. One of the confirmed sightings happened in Poole last year.

People are implored to report any sightings of Asian Hornets, along with photographs, to alertnonnative@ceh.ac.uk

For more information about Asian Hornets and how to identify them, visit bbka.org.uk

https://www.beeculture.com/catch-the-buzz-canadas-york-university-to-develop-beecsi-tool-to-help-canadas-rapidly-declining-honey-bees-and-bbka-on-guard-for-asian-hornet/?utm_source=Catch+The+Buzz&utm_campaign=ca942c1b77-Catch_The_Buzz_4_29_2015&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0272f190ab-ca942c1b77-256252085

CATCH THE BUZZ: All Around The Beeyard

CATCH THE BUZZ October 4, 2019

“ALL AROUND THE BEEYARD IS A REGULAR COLUMN IN BEE CULTURE, WRITTEN BY OUR READERS FOR OUR READERS. HOW TO SOLVE THOSE TRICKY PROBLEMS.”
.

all around the beeyard.jpg

Have  you figured out a way to fix it, move it, make it, shake it, show it, know it, record it, get to it, or anything else that has made what you do with bees easier, faster, smarter, better, cheaper, or just plain more fun? You can’t buy these in a catalog, they are the GREAT ideas that everyday beekeepers see, do, make, discover, uncover that makes what they do more fun, cheaper, easier or faster.

We’ll bet you have one of those ideas, tricks or tips or maybe 2 or 3 or 10. Share them with the world with a short write up, a photo or two or a drawing or two and we’ll share them with our thousands of readers. Everyone that gets picked every month gets a free 1 year subscription, and the best one each month gets a $100 prize.

Send your tips and tricks and best ideas, along with a short write up and a photo or 2 or 3 to kim@beeculture, with BEEYARD in the subject line, and we’ll share them with the world. Hurry, somebody somewhere needs and wants that best idea you have, and you can give them a hand. And thanks.

https://www.beeculture.com/catch-the-buzz-all-around-the-beeyard-is-a-regular-column-in-bee-culture-written-by-our-readers-for-our-readers-how-to-solve-those-tricky-problems-2/?utm_source=Catch+The+Buzz&utm_campaign=aa15765df2-Catch_The_Buzz_4_29_2015&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0272f190ab-aa15765df2-256252085

New Tool Improves Beekeepers' Overwintering Odds and Bottom Line

PHYS.org By Kim Kaplan, US Department of Agriculture September 18, 2019

Credit: Lilla Frerichs/public domain

Credit: Lilla Frerichs/public domain

A new tool from the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) can predict the odds that honey bee colonies overwintered in cold storage will be large enough to rent for almond pollination in February. Identifying which colonies will not be worth spending dollars to overwinter can improve beekeepers' bottom line.

Beekeepers have been losing an average of 30 percent of overwintered colonies for nearly 15 years. It is expensive to overwinter colonies in areas where winter temperatures stay above freezing. So a less expensive practice of overwintering bee colonies in cold storage is becoming popular.

This new tool calculates the probability of a managed honey bee colony surviving the winter based on two measurements: the size of colony and the percent varroa mite infestation in September, according to ARS entomologist Gloria DeGrandi-Hoffman, who headed the team. DeGrandi-Hoffman is research leader of the ARS Carl Hayden Bee Research Center in Tucson, Arizona.

By consulting the probability table for the likelihood of a colony having a minimum of six frames of bees—the number required for a colony to be able to fulfill a pollination contract for almond growers come February—beekeepers can decide in September if it is economically worthwhile to overwinter the colony in cold storage.

"The size of a colony in late summer or early fall can be deceiving with respect to its chances of making it through the winter. Even large colonies with more than 12 frames of bees (about 30,000 bees) have less than a 0.5 probability (50 percent chance) of being suitable for almond pollination if they have 5 or more mites per 100 bees in September," DeGrandi-Hoffman said.

Even with this cost-cutting help, the research team found that revenue from pollination contracts by itself is not likely to provide a sustainable income to a beekeeper anymore. They followed 190 honey bee colonies and recorded all costs.

Considerable resources were expended to feed colonies and on varroa mite and pathogen control. Costs were about $200 per colony.

Almond pollination contracts paid an average of $190 per colony in 2019.

One way for beekeepers to remain economically viable as a business, is to produce a honey crop from their bees. This is most often facilitated by moving colonies to the Northern Great Plains where bees can forage for nectar and pollen from a wide variety flowering plants.

"The situation has changed a lot. It is more expensive to manage honey bees with costs to feed colonies when flowers are not available and to control varroa mites. And it is more difficult to find places for honey bee colonies that provide the diverse nutrition they need," said DeGrandi-Hoffman. "Pollination revenue alone is just not adequate for beekeepers to stay in business. But we need beekeepers because managed bees are a lynchpin in agricultural production today."

Successfully using cold storage will help beekeepers' bottom line, but we are really just learning what the best management practices should be with cold storage," she added.

https://phys.org/news/2019-09-tool-beekeepers-overwintering-odds-bottom.html

MSU Economist's Research on Colony Collapse Disorder Published in National Journal

PHYS.org By Montana State University October 4, 2019

The work of a Montana State University professor examining the economic impacts of colony collapse disorder among commercial honeybees was published in the Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists last month.

Randy Rucker, a professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics and Economics in the MSU College of Agriculture, began looking into colony collapse disorder several years ago with colleagues from North Carolina State University and Oregon State University, for the purpose of estimating its economic impacts. The onset of the disorder was an unexpected shock to commercial beekeeping and pollination markets that first received national attention in the winter of 2006-07 when mortality rates were estimated to be almost 30%.

Colony collapse disorder is still a poorly understood phenomenon, wrote Rucker and his co-authors in the paper's introduction. Since its onset, along with other pollinator health issues such as the Varrona mite, which feeds on developing bees, it has caused significant concern among beekeepers and the public.

"With colony collapse disorder, a beekeeper goes out and virtually all the worker bees are gone," said Rucker. "Twenty thousand, 30,000, 40,000 worker bees, just gone. There are very few dead worker bees on the ground near the colony, and the queen, the brood and all the food are still there. But the bees are just gone."

With so little known about what causes colony collapse disorder, Rucker and his team set out to identify its economic ripple effects by examining trends in four categories: number of commercial honeybee colonies nationwide, honey production, prices of queens and packaged bees and pollination fees charged by commercial beekeepers to growers. The team found some surprising results.

Bee population is known to fall during the winter, said Rucker. Prior to the onset of colony collapse disorder, the average winter mortality rate was about 15%. Beekeepers have long known how to replace dead hives and are prepared to deal with losses, typically in one of two ways.

The first method of offsetting winter losses is called splitting, where a beekeeper takes half the bees in a healthy colony, moves them to a struggling colony and adds a newly fertilized queen, purchased for $18-25 and received through the mail. After about six weeks, there are once again two healthy hives.

The other way to increase colony numbers after winter losses is to simply buy a package of bees, also through the mail, which includes a fertilized queen and several thousand worker bees. Beekeepers place the bees in the dead hive and then watch as a healthy hive develops. Both methods are relatively easy and inexpensive for beekeepers—and have remained so after the onset of colony collapse disorder, the study found.

"Beekeepers know how to replace dead hives," said Rucker. "As winter mortality increased after CCD appeared and beekeepers worried about having enough hives to meet their pollination contracts in the spring, they responded by splitting more hives in mid- to late summer and would then end up with the number they needed."

Even with more hives split and more bees purchased, the prices of queens and packaged bees have not increased dramatically, the study found. From this result, the authors infer that "the supply of queens and packaged bees is sufficiently elastic that any increases in demand associated with CCD have not resulted in measurable increases in price."

The team found similar results when they examined trends in colony numbers and honey production. While there were pre-existing downward trends in both metrics before the onset of colony collapse disorder, the rate of decline has not increased, said Rucker. In fact, colony numbers in 2018 were higher than they had been over the last 20 years.

The sole instance of a pronounced negative impact came when the team studied trends in pollination fees for commercial crops. Even there, however, only one commercially important crop showed a significant increase in price: almonds.

"Almonds get pollinated in February or March, and it's really the only major crop that requires pollination during that time of year," said Rucker. With about a million acres of almonds in need of pollination each year, it takes about 70% of U.S. managed honeybee colonies to get the job done.

Pollination fees for almonds rose from roughly $70 to almost $160—adjusted for inflation—over the winters of 2004-05 and 2005-06, but Rucker and his co-authors noticed something unusual about the timing. Those increases happened before colony collapse disorder appeared on the scene over the winter of 2006-07.

"Almond pollination fees did go up substantially, but they went up before CCD hit," said Rucker. "You can't attribute those increases to colony collapse disorder."

The bottom line, he said, is that while there have been changes in the commercial pollinator markets, few can be directly linked to colony collapse disorder or any other recent pollinator health concerns. This is good news for beekeepers and consumers alike, he added.

"When we started this project, we expected to find huge effects, but we found very small ones," said Rucker. "The only effects we found on consumers, for example, is that they probably pay about 10 cents more for a $7, one-pound can of almonds at the grocery store."

The reason the disorder's impacts are so small, said Rucker, is directly linked to the fact that most beekeepers know that bees and honeybee colonies are going to die over the course of the year, and they have developed methods of dealing with those fluctuations. As a result, they have been able to react quickly to disruptions like CCD. But there are still a lot of unknowns about the disorder, and the paper focused on the particular overlap of colony collapse disorder and economics.

"The bottom line is that beekeepers are savvy [businesspeople]," he said. "Our research provides reason for optimism about the future ability of commercial beekeepers to adapt to environmental or biological shocks to their operations and to pollination markets. It says nothing, however, about non-managed pollinators. Data on those pollinators' populations are sparse, and the impacts of maladies like CCD on their populations are not well understood. There is definitely much more work to be done to grasp the effects of CCD and other threats to bee health."

https://phys.org/news/2019-10-msu-economist-colony-collapse-disorder.html

Randy Oliver Workshop

The Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association
is pleased to present the
Randy Oliver Workshop

Registration Required

Randy Oliver headshot.jpg

Randy Oliver is a world renowned speaker, educator, bee biologist, leading researcher, commercial beekeeper, and regular contributor to the American Beekeeping Journal.  He is one of the premier beekeeping speakers in the U.S. and the owner/author of http://scientificbeekeeping.com.

WHEN:
Saturday, October 19, 2019, 9AM - 1 or 2PM (approx.)

(Registration Required)
WHERE:
California State Polytechnic University (CalPolyPomona)
3801 West Temple Ave., Pomona, CA 91768
Building 34 marked as the Meat Laboratory
https://www.foundation.cpp.edu/content/maps/foundation-map.pdf

Lunch Provided: Pulled Pork, Beans, Cole Slaw, Chips, Water & Soda

and

WHEN:
Sunday, October 20, 2019, 11AM - 2PM (approx.)

(Registration Required)
WHERE:
The Valley Hive
10538 Topanga Canyon Blvd.
Chatsworth, CA 91311 (818) 280-6500
Please park on Topanga Canyon Blvd.
Lunch Provided: TBD

COST:

Registration Required
FREE for LACBA Members
$25 for Non-Members
Become a Member: $20

Additional information about the Randy Oliver Workshop will be provided
at our upcoming
LACBA Meeting October 7, 2019.

The Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. Through the volunteer efforts of LACBA members we raise monies throughout the year at events such as the LA County Fair Bee Booth, LA Zoo Spring Fling, Honey Harvest Festival and other endeavors. Through honey sales as various events and donations to our organization, we gain the funds necessary to provide educational and informational opportunities such as the Randy Oliver Workshop.
Please come to our LACBA Meeting and learn more about the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association.

https://www.losangelescountybeekeepers.com/

Researchers Determine Pollen Abundance and Diversity In Five Major Pollinator Dependent Crops

Oregon State University Lab Manager September 2, 2019

Ramesh Sagili, Oregon State University associate professor of apiculture and Extension specialist, examines honeybees in Madras, Oregon.CREDIT: LYNN KETCHUM, OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

Ramesh Sagili, Oregon State University associate professor of apiculture and Extension specialist, examines honeybees in Madras, Oregon.CREDIT: LYNN KETCHUM, OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

CORVALLIS, Ore. — A new study provides valuable insights into pollen abundance and diversity available to honeybee colonies employed in five major pollinator-dependent crops in Oregon and California, including California’s massive almond industry.

The study, a collaboration between Oregon State University (OSU) and Texas A&M University, found that almond, cherry, and meadowfoam provide ample pollen to honeybees, but highbush blueberry and hybrid carrot seed crops may not. In addition, California almonds don’t provide as much pollen diversity as other crops, according to the findings, published in the Journal of Economic Entomology.

The western honeybee is the major pollinator of fruit, nut, vegetable, and seed crops that depend on bee pollination for high quality and yield. The findings are important because both pollen abundance and diversity are critical for colony growth and survival of the western honeybee, said study corresponding author Ramesh Sagili, associate professor of apiculture and honeybee Extension specialist in OSU’s College of Agricultural Sciences.

“Pollen diversity is important for the growth and development of bees, and low amounts of pollen availability to honeybee colonies can dramatically affect brood rearing,” Sagili said. “Beekeepers that employ their colonies for pollination of crops like hybrid carrot seed and highbush blueberry should frequently assess the amount of pollen stores in their colonies and provide protein supplements if pollen stores are low.”

Nectar and pollen provide essential nutrients for honeybees. A honeybee colony’s protein source is pollen, which has varying amounts of amino acids, lipids, vitamins, and minerals. These nutrients obtained from pollen are essential for honeybee larval development. Pollen largely contributes to the growth of fat bodies in larvae and egg development in the queen.

Well-nourished individuals in a honeybee colony are able to withstand the effects of other stressors such as parasites and insecticides, in addition to the long-distance transport of colonies known as “migratory management.” Bees are trucked across the county to pollinate various cropping systems—more than 1 million hives are transported to California each year just to pollinate almonds.

A diet low in pollen diversity hurts a colony’s defense system, which consequently increases disease susceptibility and pesticide sensitivity. During critical crop bloom periods, growers rent large numbers of honeybee colonies to pollinate their crops. Approximately 2.5 million commercially managed honeybee colonies are used for crop pollination in the United States every year.

Some cropping systems may put bees at risk for temporary nutritional deficiency if the crop plant’s pollen is deficient in certain nutrients and bees are unable to find an alternative source of these nutrients, Sagili said.

“It’s crucial for beekeepers and crop producers to understand the pollen abundance and diversity that honeybees encounter during crop pollination,” he said, adding that blueberry and hybrid carrot seed producers can mitigate nutritional deficiencies by providing supplemental food or forage, including commercially available protein supplements for bees.

Renting colonies to growers for pollination services is a significant source of income for commercial beekeepers, but it also requires them to repeatedly transport the colonies between crops throughout the growing season. In this study, the research team collaborated with 17 migratory commercial beekeepers for pollen collection from honeybee colonies in five different cropping systems from late February to August of 2012.

They installed pollen traps on at least five colonies at each site and collected pollen from the colonies at the height of the blooming season.

They found that California’s vast almond footprint—1 million acres and counting—provides more than enough pollen for the nearly 2 million honeybees employed to pollinate the orchards, but pollen diversity was low when compared with other crops.

“We think the reason for that is almonds bloom early in the year when there are so few plant species in bloom, so bees have few other forage options and primarily rely on almond pollen,” Sagili said. “There are parts of the northern and southern ends of California’s San Joaquin Valley where there are no other crops in bloom when almond trees bloom, which may further contribute to poor availability of diverse pollen.”

Study co-authors are Ellen Topitzhofer, Hannah Lucas, Priyadarshini Chakrabarti, and Carolyn Breece—all researchers at OSU’s Honey Bee Lab—and Vaughn Bryant at Texas A&M’s Palynology Laboratory.

The Oregon State Beekeepers Association provided funding for the study.

https://www.labmanager.com/news/2019/08/researchers-determine-pollen-abundance-and-diversity-in-five-major-pollinator-dependent-crops?fbclid=IwAR25BLUNpAsa1gGhpLtLh-uuzDQu_La7RHMeRBFGy28H6cCJWH0yeKoKHgk#.XYveelVKjIW

Related: https://academic.oup.com/jee/article/112/5/2040/5522909

Honey Bees Remember Happy and Sad Times, Scientists Discover

Newsweek (Tech & Science) By Aristos Georgiou September 10, 2019

While the brains of honey bees are tiny compared to those of humans, the insects are capable of some surprisingly advanced thinking. A study published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences has now cast new light on the insects' cognitive abilities.

A team of researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign found that honey bees can remember positive and negative experiences—such as taking care of their young or fending off an enemy. These memories are then stored in specific areas of their brains, according to how good or bad the experience was.

Scientists have long known that vertebrates—animals with tail bones—like ourselves are capable of storing memories of pleasure and pain in distinct brain areas such as this. However, this has never been documented before in the minds of bees.

"We wanted to know whether bees, with a tiny brain, devote different parts of it to processing social information that is either negative or positive," Gene Robinson, an author of the study from Urbana-Champaign's Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, told Newsweek.

"We found that bees do devote different parts of their brain to processing social information that is either negative or positive," Robinson said. "This discovery is striking given how small their brains are; we did not expect such spatial segregation in the processing of social information of different valence."

Valence is a term used in psychology when discussing emotions to refer to the intrinsic positivity or negativity of an event, object or situation.

In the study, the researchers looked at regions of the honey bee brain that's present in other invertebrates, referred to as "mushroom bodies," which are associated with sensory processing, learning and memory.

They compared the expression of genes following aggressive or collaborative social interactions, demonstrating that distinct compartments of these mushroom bodies were specifically activated depending on the valence of the interaction—in other words, whether the interaction was harmful or beneficial.

"We used genes that respond very quickly to new stimuli as markers to see which parts of the brain are activated for each type of stimulus," Robinson said.

According to the scientists, the latest study provides new insight into animal cognition.

"These findings can help us better understand 'biological embedding,' or how social information 'gets under the skin' to affect subsequent behavior," he said. "Biological embedding is an important issue in understanding health and well-being in humans."

Furthermore, because the type of memory that the researchers documented is well-established in the brains of vertebrates, the latest findings demonstrate a link between vertebrate and invertebrate cognition despite the two animal groups diverging in evolutionary terms around 600 million years ago.

Apis Mellifera on August 10, 2019 in Girona, Spain.MANUEL MEDIR/GETTY IMAGES

Apis Mellifera on August 10, 2019 in Girona, Spain.MANUEL MEDIR/GETTY IMAGES

LAST WEEKEND FOR THE LA COUNTY FAIR - FUN, FUN, FUN AT THE BEE BOOTH!

LA County Fair 2019 logo 320.jpg

LAST WEEKEND FOR THE LA COUNTY FAIR!

Pomona Fairgrounds
1101 West McKinley Avenue
Pomona, CA 91768
(The Bee Booth is located across from the “Big Red Barn”)
https://www.lacountyfair.com/

Fair Runs August 30 - September 22, 2019
(Closed Mondays & Tuesdays)
Fair Times & Schedule

Ann and Stacey and stickers.jpg
Bill and Stacey in booth.jpg
observation hive with mom and kids.jpg
Bill and Stacey in suit.jpg
tie die.jpg
honey stix.jpg

LA County Fair Bee Booth 2019 - Catch the Buzz About Bees!

Catch the Buzz About Bees at the Bee Booth at the LA County Fair. Honey bees are one of the most fascinating creatures on the planet. Step inside the bee booth and you'll hear the 'buzz of the bees'. Peer inside our live observation hive for an exciting look at what goes on inside a beehive. Our experienced beekeepers will explain how bees communicate through sent and the 'waggle dance,' how they travel for miles to gather nectar to make honey, learn about the different jobs worker bees do, the duties of the drones, and how a bee becomes a queen. See if YOU CAN FIND THE QUEEN!

The exquisite macro-photography of Kodua Galieti shows the amazing intricacies of bees.

Come, meet the bees!

[Many thanks to Lia @OlivewoodBees Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/olivewoodbees/ for this wonderful video peek inside the Los Angeles County Fair Bee Booth!]

THE BEE BOOTH’S-A-BUZZING!

a sweet welcome!

a sweet welcome!

CONGRATULATIONS! FIRST TO FIND THE QUEEN TODAY!

CONGRATULATIONS! FIRST TO FIND THE QUEEN TODAY!

EXCITEMENT IN THE BEE BOOTH!

EXCITEMENT IN THE BEE BOOTH!

SWEET HONEY IN THE COOL MIST!

SWEET HONEY IN THE COOL MIST!

2 WEEKENDS LEFT FOR THE LA COUNTY FAIR!

LA County Fair 2019 logo 480.jpg

Pomona Fairgrounds
1101 West McKinley Avenue
Pomona, CA 91768
(The Bee Booth is located across from the “Big Red Barn”)
https://www.lacountyfair.com/

Fair Runs August 30 - September 22, 2019
(Closed Mondays & Tuesdays)
Fair Times & Schedule for the General Public